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This ruby I purchased may be a garnet - What would you do?

MillieLou

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Feb 27, 2020
Messages
700
But this is precisely why it's disappointing to be met with the responses I got when I told them what the lab found. $70 may not be much to many customers and perhaps not even the vendor, but if I were the vendor, I would show a little more concern, if that's the right term. Unless they personally tested the stone themselves, they are assuming that their stock hasn't been compromised in some way.
I would see this incident as a red flag to dig deeper and find out if my suppliers/wholesalers may have been ripping me off my mixing cheaper stones in with parcels. It might uncover a hidden issue that is much, much bigger than just $70. Instead, I was told that it's a ruby that looks like a garnet - Duh. That's how it's supposed to look and they've sold thousands so that guarantees that I got what I paid for. I can't even tell if this is suspicious or just some "treat em mean, keep em keen" form of customer service.

This is exactly the point I was making @roxta . Your feelings are 100% valid here. I would not want to buy from this vendor again even if it comes back as a ruby. They have already shown themselves to have lacklustre customer service. There are many other great vendors - I wouldn't be wasting my time trying to work out if they're actively dishonest, careless or just a bit uninterested in me as a customer. I'd just be out.

FWIW I gave a family member a piece with a blue sapphire when they had a boy, as I wasn't keen on the birthstone of the month he was born (blue for a boy!). Lots of options. Pearl would be lovely too.
 

VividRed

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Dec 25, 2018
Messages
313
Even if the stone tests as corundum (possible), no reputable lab would call it a ruby. The simple fact that your vendor has an “approved” lab is ridiculous. You should chose the lab you want, pay for the test of course, and take it from there.

However, given the amounts of money at stake this makes no economic sense. If you want a ruby for your friend, there are plenty of pretty, heated rubies out there for a couple hundred dollars if you stay below
the carat mark (e.g from mozambique, afghanistan, etc. avoid Burmese rubies, there is an origin premium that makes no sense in these price ranges). At any rate, they will look significantly better than the one you posted. Stop torturing yourself over this stone, it’s not worth it ;-)

Heck, I will send you a 1ct unheated ruby from
afghanistan for free if you don’t find anything. It is quite included but still definitely a ruby ;-)
 

MissSarah

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Mar 13, 2014
Messages
274
@MissSarah did. I have ordered one today. Hopefully it will be delivered soon but if not, I figure it will come in handy in the future anyway.

You're going to love having one around! It's like a toy for playing with your jewelry and gems if you collect them. Also, helpful for cleaning if you have very little dogs who are resistant to potty training.
 

JewelledEscalators

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Mar 30, 2019
Messages
209
Even if the stone tests as corundum (possible), no reputable lab would call it a ruby. The simple fact that your vendor has an “approved” lab is ridiculous. You should chose the lab you want, pay for the test of course, and take it from there.

However, given the amounts of money at stake this makes no economic sense. If you want a ruby for your friend, there are plenty of pretty, heated rubies out there for a couple hundred dollars if you stay below
the carat mark (e.g from mozambique, afghanistan, etc. avoid Burmese rubies, there is an origin premium that makes no sense in these price ranges). At any rate, they will look significantly better than the one you posted. Stop torturing yourself over this stone, it’s not worth it ;-)

Heck, I will send you a 1ct unheated ruby from
afghanistan for free if you don’t find anything. It is quite included but still definitely a ruby ;-)

That's so generous of you :mrgreen2:
 

kah42

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Aug 17, 2018
Messages
103
I'm not knowledgeable about the differences between the stones, and I'm not sure what I'd do if I were in your shoes... but I'm very interested in seeing what you designed. I love custom pieces, and it's clear you care very much about your friend. Would you mind sharing some sketches?
 

roxta

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 23, 2019
Messages
188
I think I may know which seller it is - if so, I can understand the OP's dilemma. They have a really good selection of stones at very affordable prices. I have them in mind for future purchaeses too.

Who knows, maybe it is a ruby. A ruby that looks to the eye a lot like garnet - maybe the lab the jeweller used was going by the way it looked, and didn't necessarily carry out the whole set of tests you might get with a printed cert (I'm assuming it was just a verbal since the jeweller wasn't charged).

Completely and utterly speculating here, so I could be totally wrong :D

Like @Ionysis said, there's a number of us now invested in this story, so perhaps the cert to identify the stone should be crowd-funded...only joking ;)2

I'm sure you can understand even if you haven't guessed the vendor correctly. It's not so much about "building a relationship" as me preferring not to burn bridges where there are good deals to be had. I'm not saying let's be best buddies but I'd like to maintain a civil relationship with trust on both sides to facilitate (potential) future purchases rather than write-off every stone on my wishlist there. I'm really unimpressed with the vendor's responses though, but I'm willing to keep an open mind that there's a chance the stone is a ruby, or at least a sapphire. Looking forward to getting it back and doing some testing myself.
 

roxta

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 23, 2019
Messages
188
This is exactly the point I was making @roxta . Your feelings are 100% valid here. I would not want to buy from this vendor again even if it comes back as a ruby. They have already shown themselves to have lacklustre customer service. There are many other great vendors - I wouldn't be wasting my time trying to work out if they're actively dishonest, careless or just a bit uninterested in me as a customer. I'd just be out.

FWIW I gave a family member a piece with a blue sapphire when they had a boy, as I wasn't keen on the birthstone of the month he was born (blue for a boy!). Lots of options. Pearl would be lovely too.

Thanks for saying my feelings are valid. I think so! :clap:

This situation actually reminds me of this hawker stall my mother used to take me to in Singapore. The best prawn noodles ever but expect to get bossed around quite rudely by the proprietor. It's self-service, as many hawker stalls are. The noodles were so tasty and such great value for money that the queues were super long and everyone got yelled at indiscriminately, but they were OK with it. It was an accepted part of the process. And it wasn't the only venue it happened. I recall many including a scary old lady who ran the bakery.
Perhaps it's just the way I was brought up or a cultural thing but if I'm getting what I pay for then I may put up with some less than courteous service like water off a duck's back. Would I willingly interact with the stall owner in any circumstances other than to get those noodles? No. But when I had a craving, I would go there in the full knowledge that the price is for a great product, not customer service. Now that I've typed it out, I acknowledge that it's odd. But I'm sure others may have grown up with similar experiences that shaped their "tolerance".
 

roxta

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 23, 2019
Messages
188
Even if the stone tests as corundum (possible), no reputable lab would call it a ruby. The simple fact that your vendor has an “approved” lab is ridiculous. You should chose the lab you want, pay for the test of course, and take it from there.

However, given the amounts of money at stake this makes no economic sense. If you want a ruby for your friend, there are plenty of pretty, heated rubies out there for a couple hundred dollars if you stay below
the carat mark (e.g from mozambique, afghanistan, etc. avoid Burmese rubies, there is an origin premium that makes no sense in these price ranges). At any rate, they will look significantly better than the one you posted. Stop torturing yourself over this stone, it’s not worth it ;-)

Heck, I will send you a 1ct unheated ruby from
afghanistan for free if you don’t find anything. It is quite included but still definitely a ruby ;-)

That's very kind of you but I can't except. There aren't many labs in my city so I actually would have chosen this one if the vendor hadn't recommended it anyway. Of course I won't spend a cent unless my own testing gives me confidence it may not be corundum, and unless I have a very detailed agreement in writing from the vendor as to what will happen if it's not.

A couple of hundred dollars is certainly out of the question for me in this situation. I would spend that on BFF if it were other types of gems and other colours, but for a little red stone? No can do. Honestly, the redder the rubies I've looked at, the more they hurt my eyes. :lol: $70 will be fine if it's a ruby or "reddish" sapphire (both BFF's and my birthstone), otherwise I have other options that are based on zodiac sign or birth-day rather than birth-month.

But thank you again for your very kind offer!
 

icy_jade

Ideal_Rock
Joined
May 1, 2009
Messages
4,883
This situation actually reminds me of this hawker stall my mother used to take me to in Singapore. The best prawn noodles ever but expect to get bossed around quite rudely by the proprietor. It's self-service, as many hawker stalls are. The noodles were so tasty and such great value for money that the queues were super long and everyone got yelled at indiscriminately, but they were OK with it. It was an accepted part of the process. And it wasn't the only venue it happened. I recall many including a scary old lady who ran the bakery.
Perhaps it's just the way I was brought up or a cultural thing but if I'm getting what I pay for then I may put up with some less than courteous service like water off a duck's back. Would I willingly interact with the stall owner in any circumstances other than to get those noodles? No. But when I had a craving, I would go there in the full knowledge that the price is for a great product, not customer service. Now that I've typed it out, I acknowledge that it's odd. But I'm sure others may have grown up with similar experiences that shaped their "tolerance".

Omg it sounds familiar! For me honestly I don’t put up with such nonsense. There are enough other yummy hawker stalls around that I can go to, or just don’t eat!

Ok so are you in Singapore? If so the only local lab I trust is Nanyang. You can opt for a verbal assessment, and only cert after hearing if it’s a ruby or not. In this case it’s weird but I guess you need the cert more if it’s not a ruby? I usually choose verbal, and ask them to call if I have any doubts. Same for origin. Like just put origin if Burmese or Sri Lanka else nevermind right. Save a bit also ok. Heh.

Not sure which seller but I’m so curious!
 

roxta

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 23, 2019
Messages
188
I'm not knowledgeable about the differences between the stones, and I'm not sure what I'd do if I were in your shoes... but I'm very interested in seeing what you designed. I love custom pieces, and it's clear you care very much about your friend. Would you mind sharing some sketches?

It's just a simple, dainty design with the princess cut stone kite-set (diagonal set) in the middle of the gold pendant. Bezel/gypsy setting. The pendant can slide on the chain so it has that "floating" look to it. Baby's name engraved on one side. My (rough) sketches are with the jeweller but if I proceed with the project, I'll try to post some CAD pics here.
 

roxta

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 23, 2019
Messages
188
Omg it sounds familiar! For me honestly I don’t put up with such nonsense. There are enough other yummy hawker stalls around that I can go to, or just don’t eat!

Ok so are you in Singapore? If so the only local lab I trust is Nanyang. You can opt for a verbal assessment, and only cert after hearing if it’s a ruby or not. In this case it’s weird but I guess you need the cert more if it’s not a ruby? I usually choose verbal, and ask them to call if I have any doubts. Same for origin. Like just put origin if Burmese or Sri Lanka else nevermind right. Save a bit also ok. Heh.

Not sure which seller but I’m so curious!

I'm not in Singapore but my mother is Singaporean so I've spent my life visiting there often (pre-COVID). HAHAH I think I'm just super "chill" with that kind of treatment in markets, restaurants, hawker centres, etc having been exposed to it all my life. As long as you don't cheat me on money, a little rudeness goes in one ear, out the other. Once I take my tray and sit down, the tummy is happy and I won't hear you anymore! :lol: Maybe it's more common and acceptable in certain cultures and so it's hard to begrudge the proprietors who were brought up to think it's fine to speak to customers that way.

This vendor hasn't been rude but perhaps not as empathetic as one would hope. I run a business too and I wouldn't have responded the way they did. It was very much a "It is what I say it is, so take it or leave it" approach. This is not a bowl of noodles, this is supposed to be a precious gemstone....
 

MagpieMama

Rough_Rock
Joined
Nov 4, 2020
Messages
23
It's just a simple, dainty design with the princess cut stone kite-set (diagonal set) in the middle of the gold pendant. Bezel/gypsy setting. The pendant can slide on the chain so it has that "floating" look to it. Baby's name engraved on one side. My (rough) sketches are with the jeweller but if I proceed with the project, I'll try to post some CAD pics here.

Your design sounds really beautiful, and even more beautiful is the desire to do something so personal and special for your friend. I love giving and receiving unique/sentimental gifts as well. I’m sure whatever the outcome your BFF will be utterly touched by your thoughtfulness. She and her little boy are both very lucky to have you in their lives!
 

PrecisionGem

Brilliant_Rock
Trade
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Messages
1,815
This should be a simple matter to separate a garnet from ruby. If you can't get a good reading on your refractometer, than buy a cheap pair of polarizing sun glasses, pop out the lenses and make a simple polariscope. Place the stone between the lenses with a light source below the bottom lens. Rotate the stone as you view it through the top lens. If it goes from bright to dark, it's not a garnet. If it stays the same, it's not a ruby.
 

roxta

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 23, 2019
Messages
188
Your design sounds really beautiful, and even more beautiful is the desire to do something so personal and special for your friend. I love giving and receiving unique/sentimental gifts as well. I’m sure whatever the outcome your BFF will be utterly touched by your thoughtfulness. She and her little boy are both very lucky to have you in their lives!

Thank you. We've been friends for 17 years, since our school days. And for the past 15 years we have not lived in the same city but still tried our best to keep in touch regularly. We see each other in person every couple of years and I should have been able to visit her after the baby, if not for COVID ruining everything. I have no doubt she will cherish anything I give her, whether it has high commercial value or not. And it's fine if she doesn't wear it, but I think it will be cool if when we're 90, she can pull out this pendant from her jewellery box and say "remember this from 2021?". :razz:
 

roxta

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 23, 2019
Messages
188
This should be a simple matter to separate a garnet from ruby. If you can't get a good reading on your refractometer, than buy a cheap pair of polarizing sun glasses, pop out the lenses and make a simple polariscope. Place the stone between the lenses with a light source below the bottom lens. Rotate the stone as you view it through the top lens. If it goes from bright to dark, it's not a garnet. If it stays the same, it's not a ruby.

Thanks for this tip. I'll go get a pair of cheap sunglasses from the chemist. Would something like this give reliable results? http://www.yourgemologist.com/Sunglass Polariscope/sunpolariscope.html
 

Starstruck8

Rough_Rock
Joined
May 13, 2021
Messages
87
You may not even need to wreck the sunglasses. Many (not all) computer/phone/camera screens are polarized. To check yours, display a mostly white image, then rotate the screen while looking at it through polaroid glasses. If you can get it to black out, you are in business. Proceed as above.
 

roxta

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 23, 2019
Messages
188
I got the stone back from the jeweller today.

First, I used a DIY polariscope. The stone did lighten and darken as it was rotated, but from my research, this is quite expected for red garnets with high RI (>1.7), which is what I'm dealing with: Isotropic - most garnets will remain black in all orientations under a polariscope but some will not. These garnets possess an anomalous double refraction (A.D.R.) due to straining of the crystal lattice. Ugrandites are commonly A.D.R., as are some rhodolites and some almandines.

So polariscope results weren't conclusive. I also tried seeing if the brightest point got even brighter when the lenses were aligned, but it wasn't as obvious as when I did it with a loose diamond (to compare to something singly refractive).

Next, I took MANY readings with my refractometer, rotating it round and round for what seemed like an eternity. I learned two things:

1) I was able to get a single, clear distinct line when the stone was roughly 0 degrees and 180 degrees. In between these positions, I would get a less clear reading, like I did when I measured the stone earlier. It looks like two or three blurry lines when I look through my phone camera, and by eye, I can just about pinpoint the sharpest of the lines. I did so many rotations that eventually I could anticipate what I would see even before looking through the eyepiece - first 90 degrees is blurry, second is sharp, third is blurry, fourth is sharp. All the 45 degrees in between are blurry.

2) The sharp line is around 1.762 or 1.763. The blurry line (by eye) is around 1.767 or 1.768. I tested 6 different sapphires that I have, ranging from medium pink to seafoam to very dark teal (almost black). They all showed distinct sharp lines ranging from 1.754 to 1.764. So far I haven't seen any of the sapphires go higher than the mystery stone. The seafoam sapphire (pear shaped) had a little blurriness between 0 and 180 degrees too.

I'm going to give my eyes some much needed rest and look at the stone and other sapphires again tomorrow. Hoping the UV torch I ordered arrives soon too. Dang, at-home gemmology is hard!
 

roxta

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 23, 2019
Messages
188
Here are more pics. I'm going to say this again - I am fine with this colour. In fact, if I had to wear a red stone, I would probably choose this colour... or something even darker.... And yes, I know you all hate it. :eek-2:

So my focus remains on whether the stone is a ruby/sapphire or garnet.

This is in the shade. Sky was a little overcast.
20210914_161341.png

This is out in the open. Sky still a little overcast.
20210914_161813.png

This is out in the open next to the reddest thing I could possibly find - the plastic lid of the rubbish bin :lol:. I would 500% rather rock a stone/lipstick/outfit/handbag/car this colour than the bright red colour of the bin lid. Just saying....
20210914_162058.png
 

PrecisionGem

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Messages
1,815
Corundum should have a low RI of 1.762 (-.003,+.007) and a high reading of 1.770 (-.003, +.008) Do you have a polarizing filter on your refractometer? You should get 2 readings at the same orientation of the stone by rotating the filter.
You paid only $70 for the stone, so it certainly doesn't make sense to mail to a lab and pay more than you paid for the stone. It was sold to you as corundum, so far the home test show it very well could be corundum, you like the stone, so why not be happy with it?
 

MagpieMama

Rough_Rock
Joined
Nov 4, 2020
Messages
23
This is all so fascinating - Thank you for sharing this investigation with us!
I think sending to the lab is still worth while as a way to vet the vendor before making a larger purchase from them, to satisfy your curiosity, and for the “mind clean” aspect. Particularly since this is a gift and will be given/worn as a birth stone, I would want to KNOW for sure what it is. It sounds like you feel the same.
I know you didn’t ask about color, but I think it is quite pretty in the latest pictures; the seem to give a clearer representation. Might be better suited to your BFF anyway if she (like you) is not really a “red person.”
Whatever happens, I admire your investigative determination, and I am 100% living vicariously through you :)
 

Starstruck8

Rough_Rock
Joined
May 13, 2021
Messages
87
I got the stone back from the jeweller today.

First, I used a DIY polariscope. The stone did lighten and darken as it was rotated, but from my research, this is quite expected for red garnets with high RI (>1.7), which is what I'm dealing with: Isotropic - most garnets will remain black in all orientations under a polariscope but some will not. These garnets possess an anomalous double refraction (A.D.R.) due to straining of the crystal lattice. Ugrandites are commonly A.D.R., as are some rhodolites and some almandines.

So polariscope results weren't conclusive. I also tried seeing if the brightest point got even brighter when the lenses were aligned, but it wasn't as obvious as when I did it with a loose diamond (to compare to something singly refractive).

Next, I took MANY readings with my refractometer, rotating it round and round for what seemed like an eternity. I learned two things:

1) I was able to get a single, clear distinct line when the stone was roughly 0 degrees and 180 degrees. In between these positions, I would get a less clear reading, like I did when I measured the stone earlier. It looks like two or three blurry lines when I look through my phone camera, and by eye, I can just about pinpoint the sharpest of the lines. I did so many rotations that eventually I could anticipate what I would see even before looking through the eyepiece - first 90 degrees is blurry, second is sharp, third is blurry, fourth is sharp. All the 45 degrees in between are blurry.

2) The sharp line is around 1.762 or 1.763. The blurry line (by eye) is around 1.767 or 1.768. I tested 6 different sapphires that I have, ranging from medium pink to seafoam to very dark teal (almost black). They all showed distinct sharp lines ranging from 1.754 to 1.764. So far I haven't seen any of the sapphires go higher than the mystery stone. The seafoam sapphire (pear shaped) had a little blurriness between 0 and 180 degrees too.

I'm going to give my eyes some much needed rest and look at the stone and other sapphires again tomorrow. Hoping the UV torch I ordered arrives soon too. Dang, at-home gemmology is hard!

Here is another home gemmology test, to confuse you even more…

You can view double refraction directly, if you know how to look.

This works for me: Find a device with a small red LED indicator light. Position yourself so that the LED is in front of you, at about 45° below eye level, at a reasonable distance (not critical, as long as it looks small and bright). Hold the stone close to your eye, with the table facing your eye. You should see some red spots. (These are images of the LED, refracted through a pavilion facet and the table). Tilt the stone and change your viewing angle so that you can see a spot vertically above the LED, at a fairly wide angle from it. (This can take some fiddling.) If the spot is doubled (two spots close together), the stone is doubly refractive, so not garnet. Spin the stone 90° and try again. And again, and again. If you see no doubled spots in any of the four orientations, the stone is not doubly refractive, so not ruby.

This is easier to do than it is to describe. But it is a bit fiddly, so you will want to practice with stones you know. You can use set stones if the setting is open enough. Your sapphires should show doubled images - this will show you what to look for in your stone. Singly refractive stones include garnet, spinel, diamond, CZ, glass. Don’t try this with diamond, as the multiple internal reflections will be confusing. Any other singly refractive stone would be better.

DR.jpg
 

roxta

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 23, 2019
Messages
188
Corundum should have a low RI of 1.762 (-.003,+.007) and a high reading of 1.770 (-.003, +.008) Do you have a polarizing filter on your refractometer? You should get 2 readings at the same orientation of the stone by rotating the filter.
You paid only $70 for the stone, so it certainly doesn't make sense to mail to a lab and pay more than you paid for the stone. It was sold to you as corundum, so far the home test show it very well could be corundum, you like the stone, so why not be happy with it?

Thank you so much for your help. My refractometer doesn't have a polarizing filter. Is it possible to use one of the sunglass lenses to help? I've always taken multiple readings while rotating the stones I'm testing - but I've never been able to get two totally distinct readings with any of my stones though.

I can't give my friend a piece of jewellery when I have doubts about what it is, not to mention it costs a lot more than $70 to set in 18k gold. It will keep me up at night wondering if I misled her by telling her it's a ruby. This is why I need to be sure what it is, otherwise I would rather not keep it at all. Additionally, without knowing for sure, even if I return it, I will never be able to shop with the vendor again because of this doubt. This is not ideal especially if the stone is a ruby, as the vendor claims - and there are other items I'm interested in purchasing in the future.

If I test it at a lab and it is found to be a ruby, the test will cost me around $30 more than if I had returned it at my own expense. In this case I would have paid $120 ($70 + $50) on a dark coloured ruby, but saved $20 not having to return it (as the colour is acceptable). If it is not a ruby, the vendor has offered to cover the test, and I would expect not to pay for return shipping either if they have sent me the wrong stone.
 

Rfisher

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Oct 19, 2013
Messages
4,021
Here are more pics. I'm going to say this again - I am fine with this colour. In fact, if I had to wear a red stone, I would probably choose this colour... or something even darker.... And yes, I know you all hate it. :eek-2:

So my focus remains on whether the stone is a ruby/sapphire or garnet.

This is in the shade. Sky was a little overcast.
20210914_161341.png

This is out in the open. Sky still a little overcast.
20210914_161813.png

This is out in the open next to the reddest thing I could possibly find - the plastic lid of the rubbish bin :lol:. I would 500% rather rock a stone/lipstick/outfit/handbag/car this colour than the bright red colour of the bin lid. Just saying....
20210914_162058.png

these look to me to be very similar to what’s also sold as Tanzanian /Songea red sapphire. Not all of it is blazing red/orange- some is this same color as you’ve pictured.
I can easily google close matches from two vendors that are not on the ”vendors for reference list”.

edited to add
infact it also kinda looks like a Winza I had for a short bit - from a vendor who is on that list :)
 
Last edited:

roxta

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 23, 2019
Messages
188
This is all so fascinating - Thank you for sharing this investigation with us!
I think sending to the lab is still worth while as a way to vet the vendor before making a larger purchase from them, to satisfy your curiosity, and for the “mind clean” aspect. Particularly since this is a gift and will be given/worn as a birth stone, I would want to KNOW for sure what it is. It sounds like you feel the same.
I know you didn’t ask about color, but I think it is quite pretty in the latest pictures; the seem to give a clearer representation. Might be better suited to your BFF anyway if she (like you) is not really a “red person.”
Whatever happens, I admire your investigative determination, and I am 100% living vicariously through you :)

Hahaha, I'm a science grad and I make bath products for a living. Lots of precise measuring and weighing involved every day. I'm probably getting more enjoyment out of investigating than others might, but also, I don't like the prospect of being ripped off, even for a small sum. Thanks for joining me on my "journey". Would have been great for the vendor to say "I'm sorry for the confusion, let me organize for it to be returned so I can investigate further" on Day 1, but what can you do...
 

roxta

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 23, 2019
Messages
188
Here is another home gemmology test, to confuse you even more…

You can view double refraction directly, if you know how to look.

This works for me: Find a device with a small red LED indicator light. Position yourself so that the LED is in front of you, at about 45° below eye level, at a reasonable distance (not critical, as long as it looks small and bright). Hold the stone close to your eye, with the table facing your eye. You should see some red spots. (These are images of the LED, refracted through a pavilion facet and the table). Tilt the stone and change your viewing angle so that you can see a spot vertically above the LED, at a fairly wide angle from it. (This can take some fiddling.) If the spot is doubled (two spots close together), the stone is doubly refractive, so not garnet. Spin the stone 90° and try again. And again, and again. If you see no doubled spots in any of the four orientations, the stone is not doubly refractive, so not ruby.

This is easier to do than it is to describe. But it is a bit fiddly, so you will want to practice with stones you know. You can use set stones if the setting is open enough. Your sapphires should show doubled images - this will show you what to look for in your stone. Singly refractive stones include garnet, spinel, diamond, CZ, glass. Don’t try this with diamond, as the multiple internal reflections will be confusing. Any other singly refractive stone would be better.

DR.jpg

I'm going to have to read this a few times before I can attempt it, but thank you. Unfortunately I don't have any loose SR stones other than a diamond. OR maybe I have CZ stashed somewhere, I'll have to go look. Does this work if the stone itself is a very dark red?
 

Daisys and Diamonds

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Apr 30, 2019
Messages
12,993
Here are more pics. I'm going to say this again - I am fine with this colour. In fact, if I had to wear a red stone, I would probably choose this colour... or something even darker.... And yes, I know you all hate it. :eek-2:

So my focus remains on whether the stone is a ruby/sapphire or garnet.

This is in the shade. Sky was a little overcast.
20210914_161341.png

This is out in the open. Sky still a little overcast.
20210914_161813.png

This is out in the open next to the reddest thing I could possibly find - the plastic lid of the rubbish bin :lol:. I would 500% rather rock a stone/lipstick/outfit/handbag/car this colour than the bright red colour of the bin lid. Just saying....
20210914_162058.png

the colour looks really pretty in your hand
 
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