shape
carat
color
clarity

College Tuition in 20 Years

nala

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Oct 23, 2011
Messages
5,619
For those who sacrificed so much, overcame hardships, and paid off a lot or all of their student loans, would you support the government forgiving student loan debt for others? Or for people whose parents sacrificed so much?

I am one of the parents who didn't saddle dd or myself with loans. She worked her ass off to help pay and she got some scholarships. And she got rewarded with a great career with the plus side that she learned to manage her money well. The rest was out of pocket. And I would celebrate loan forgiveness without being petty or envious for those who do get loans forgiven. It wouldn’t be the first time that the government modified loans or changed tax credits that resulted in more savings for some than others. Just like I’m not resentful of the child tax credit given now, when I never qualified for it as my DD was growing up due to income thresholds—I don’t resent that either. During Obama era, many got their home mortgage loans modified and no, I didn’t qualify either nor had the need to. That’s just the way the system works. You can let envy and resentment consume you or you can just be grateful that you are financially blessed and don’t need government handouts. The movie “The Platform” comes to mind. Without spoiling it, the theme it conveys is that the lower and middle classes are always fighting enviously with each other over the scraps those above throw in their direction. I refuse to be that petty.
 
Last edited:

voce

Ideal_Rock
Joined
May 13, 2018
Messages
4,695
I’m glad you had parents who could afford your tuition and that you had a great experience and were able to graduate debt free.

People who don’t qualify for subsidies and grants don’t necessarily have “rich parents”

Endowments for private schools vary widely

My mother raised us as a single mother and had a solidly middle class salary in an urban environment which was nowhere near enough to support both my sister and I in college and cover living expenses, but it was enough to disqualify us from need-based grants. She also was in the process of divorcing my stepfather and they wouldn’t look at her financial profile without including his, which was ludicrous. I was given huge merit scholarships from a school that had generous financial aid packages relative to competitors, and even with that, graduated with 100k+ of federal loan debt and many of my peers were in the same situation - it really is case by case

My husband as another example - this is grad school so quite different - didn’t qualify for any needbased grants and paid full tuition despite both parents being below the poverty line and living on disability

I agree this is a case by case thing, as every student is different as to what their background is and what they wish to study. It's also a case by case based on school thing. Since I did have to switch majors, and the sticker price on the school where I started at was quite high, of course I also applied to other schools, some of them public. The impression I have of private universities is they were a bit more flexible about what they could offer in terms of financial aid, if you had to negotiate. The public schools had to go by a pretty rigid formula unless there's a sports scholarship. I found the staff at public schools no less sympathetic and willing to help, but there were fewer levers they could pull to help people on an individual basis.

I'm sorry your family had to pay so much for education on a single-parent salary. That situation with the divorce is certainly something that would have gotten consideration, I feel, at the school that I went to. There's quite a variety of private universities out there, from the elite ones who have been around a long time and have large endowments to help students financially to the for-profit ones that are offering little while sucking money from the students and the government. On that end of the spectrum, that's just a trash school, period. No one intelligent would ever enroll there. The only type of private university worth going to would be the elite private institutions with more to offer than good public schools.

On the grad school side, I think it can vary by individual or school, but the big thing is the department. I can honestly say that I have been around, living and socializing with loads of grad students who were making money and graduating debt free with cash to spare even coming from a dirt-poor family. It all depends on what research projects they work on, what projects are getting big funding by private companies and/or government. Grad students involved in important research projects are effectively getting paid as they work through their degree. This is usually in tech and STEM with applications. If you're going for a liberal arts grad degree, the only way you come away debt free is if you're loaded by, say, publishing a best-selling book or getting a MacArthur Genius grant.
 

Cerulean

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Sep 13, 2019
Messages
2,474
I agree this is a case by case thing, as every student is different as to what their background is and what they wish to study. It's also a case by case based on school thing. Since I did have to switch majors, and the sticker price on the school where I started at was quite high, of course I also applied to other schools, some of them public. The impression I have of private universities is they were a bit more flexible about what they could offer in terms of financial aid, if you had to negotiate. The public schools had to go by a pretty rigid formula unless there's a sports scholarship. I found the staff at public schools no less sympathetic and willing to help, but there were fewer levers they could pull to help people on an individual basis.

I'm sorry your family had to pay so much for education on a single-parent salary. That situation with the divorce is certainly something that would have gotten consideration, I feel, at the school that I went to. There's quite a variety of private universities out there, from the elite ones who have been around a long time and have large endowments to help students financially to the for-profit ones that are offering little while sucking money from the students and the government. On that end of the spectrum, that's just a trash school, period. No one intelligent would ever enroll there. The only type of private university worth going to would be the elite private institutions with more to offer than good public schools.

On the grad school side, I think it can vary by individual or school, but the big thing is the department. I can honestly say that I have been around, living and socializing with loads of grad students who were making money and graduating debt free with cash to spare even coming from a dirt-poor family. It all depends on what research projects they work on, what projects are getting big funding by private companies and/or government. Grad students involved in important research projects are effectively getting paid as they work through their degree. This is usually in tech and STEM with applications. If you're going for a liberal arts grad degree, the only way you come away debt free is if you're loaded by, say, publishing a best-selling book or getting a MacArthur Genius grant.

I am glad your friends also experienced some amount of luck. Seriously, because I don’t know any who are in the “debt free” situation you are describing.

Some schools have been more generous than others, but none of them are the for profit money pits that are borderline criminal either - these are top ranking institutions I’m referring to including UChicago, Yale, etc.

And yes totally funding varies for grad schools substantially- his masters was liberal arts. It was a cash cow program no doubt. My masters is in STEM and they offered the first programs of their kind (or among the first) - but still don’t offer the kinds of scholarships you speak of. I haven’t met a single student on a full ride

Same goes for my undergrad - it’s a old institution and among the top 3 in the industry, it was a fine arts program. They gave generous financial packages but the only student I knew who got a full ride was exceptional and is now a famous artist.

Not sure what peers and I did wrong - but we all ended up in some amount of debt that was substantial
 

voce

Ideal_Rock
Joined
May 13, 2018
Messages
4,695
@Cerulean maybe my experiences are skewed then. My friends at school that got to make money instead of roll in debt were doing their Master's and PhD's in biotech and in computer science. Their research projects were of interest to companies with deep pockets, and being a grad student doesn't prevent them from taking side contractual work on projects just so long as their research was progressing. I think it has less to do with luck and more to do with the fact they were exceptional. The computer science PhD I'm thinking of garnered a lot of support from Google, who sponsored some portion of her expenses getting her degree (she had interned for them before) and also sponsored things like flying her to Switzerland to give talks at a conference.
 

123ducklings

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jun 10, 2020
Messages
894
For those who sacrificed so much, overcame hardships, and paid off a lot or all of their student loans, would you support the government forgiving student loan debt for others? Or for people whose parents sacrificed so much?

100% support, and I hope student loan forgiveness is the way of the future in America for SO MANY reasons.
 

LilAlex

Brilliant_Rock
Premium
Joined
Mar 3, 2018
Messages
1,226
100% support, and I hope student loan forgiveness is the way of the future in America for SO MANY reasons.

There is no way to do this fairly. And much of it is a gimme to the execrable "for-profit college" industry that produces nothing except debt.

It also helps the people who have chased their high-cost lower-middle-ranked private "dream school" with little regard to their or their family's finances. A motivated student can go to community college for two years and get into a top UC school -- CA reserves tons of slots for in-state CC grads. That's just one example of many.

Spouse worked summers in a factory to pay for her state school and then professional school. I realize that you can't really do that anymore but the in-state option -- or CC to in-state flagship -- is very good to excellent for much (most?) of the US.
 

123ducklings

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jun 10, 2020
Messages
894
There is no way to do this fairly. And much of it is a gimme to the execrable "for-profit college" industry that produces nothing except debt.

It also helps the people who have chased their high-cost lower-middle-ranked private "dream school" with little regard to their or their family's finances. A motivated student can go to community college for two years and get into a top UC school -- CA reserves tons of slots for in-state CC grads. That's just one example of many.

Spouse worked summers in a factory to pay for her state school and then professional school. I realize that you can't really do that anymore but the in-state option -- or CC to in-state flagship -- is very good to excellent for much (most?) of the US.

I went to a top-ranked UC and then worked full time as a professional to put myself through grad school at another prestigious university. I have no student loan debt. I strongly support loan forgiveness.
 

elizat

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Mar 23, 2013
Messages
3,137
There is no way to do this fairly. And much of it is a gimme to the execrable "for-profit college" industry that produces nothing except debt.

It also helps the people who have chased their high-cost lower-middle-ranked private "dream school" with little regard to their or their family's finances. A motivated student can go to community college for two years and get into a top UC school -- CA reserves tons of slots for in-state CC grads. That's just one example of many.

Spouse worked summers in a factory to pay for her state school and then professional school. I realize that you can't really do that anymore but the in-state option -- or CC to in-state flagship -- is very good to excellent for much (most?) of the US.

I don't think there is a way to do it fairly either. Plus, what do you do in the future? I think the Australian system sounds equitable. No interest loans. Reasonable repayment. I despise the for profit education schools as well. I think they should not be permitted.

I support income driven repayment and forgiveness after a certain time. I don't support everyone in society going to college for free though. I strongly support job retraining for those that want to get into a trade or learn tech skills though, rather than work so hard for hospitality wages, for example.

Income driven repayment being fixed, government paid retraining for in demand trades at a community college or trade school, for example, and no interest loans would help so many.

I do think people dedicate themselves more to something when they have skin in the game, so to speak. I don't think making everything just free for everyone accomplishes that. The GI bill works that way. You receive a benefit for service, but it requires the member contribute something (it's service based plus a financial contribution. Not a huge one, but it's there). It's the GI buy up program. Military service for college benefits should not be overlooked either. Service changed my other half's life for the better.
 
Last edited:

AllAboardTheBlingTrain

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Apr 22, 2020
Messages
1,595
I feel a bit differently but I’m not American so no skin in the game as it were.

To me, education is a right, not a privilege. I believe this is also the thinking in many European countries from my understanding (not the UK though) where college is either cheap or free. For those who can’t afford the lower fees, there are scholarships, or low/no interest loans, and it is possible to work part time while studying and pay off a vast chunk of your education. I have a friend who paid for her entire masters through internships she undertook during her studies (summer, winter, part time etc). These universities are still world class, education beyond reproach, but no need to refinance a kidney in order to get your education. These are obviously public universities, since private ones are super expensive all around the world, but these public universities are cheap as hell compared to the US public schools.
 

Dancing Fire

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 3, 2004
Messages
33,383
100% support, and I hope student loan forgiveness is the way of the future in America for SO MANY reasons.
And I hope the bank would forgive our daughter's mortgages for SO MANY good reasons. Yup, borrow the money then beg forgiveness. :rolleyes:
 
Last edited:

kenny

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 30, 2005
Messages
30,502
IMO any "loan forgiveness" is unethical because it discriminates against students who couldn't qualify for a loan - especially to get into a very expensive University.
... for instance students who had to work multiple jobs while carrying a full load at a State Uni.

Better to make all upper education "free" like K through high school is (aka paid by tax dollars) and like police and fire protection and infrastructure.

Improve America.
Raise taxes! ... especially on the rich!
 
Last edited:

Dancing Fire

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 3, 2004
Messages
33,383
Better to make all upper education "free" like K through high school is (aka paid by tax dollars) and like police and fire protection and infrastructure.
I'd agree up to CC but not universities. Heck, if everything is FREE we can all retire at the age of 30.
 

nala

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Oct 23, 2011
Messages
5,619
And I hope the bank would forgive our daughter's mortgages for SO MANY good reasons. Yup, borrow the money then beg forgiveness. :rolleyes:
Why not. They did it for businesses under the PPP program. Big and small. 669 billion, I believe. They got to borrow and never have to pay back. Why not help the little guy also?
 
Last edited:

Dancing Fire

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 3, 2004
Messages
33,383
Why not. They did it for businesses under the PPP program. Big abc small. 669 billion, I believe. They got to borrow and never have to pay back. Why not help the little guy also?
People must learn to be responsible you borrowed the $$$ you are responsible for paying it back.
 

ItsMainelyYou

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jun 27, 2014
Messages
1,761
People must learn to be responsible you borrowed the $$$ you are responsible for paying it back.

But not big business? They are a big beneficiary of American taxpayer largess.
The oil/agricultural/financial industries are the most heavily subsidized programs the US has. It's our only form of true 'socialism'. They are often irresponsible. They get bailed out continually. They use that money not as intended for employee benefit but instead goes to stock buybacks etc. They receive hundreds of millions in loans, sometimes billions, and have them forgiven all the time. It benefits no one but their bottom line.
Our Gov't shovels money at them and has for decades. It has demonstrably hurt us and drained our resources.
I'd rather some of those many billions go to education. It shouldn't be for the rich and it shouldn't be a at the risk of death in war. It shouldn't be potentially ruinous for our youth/families and it shouldn't be at the expense of the arts and humanities by which civilization's metrics are based. Education isn't a zero sum game. It benefits us all.
 

Dancing Fire

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 3, 2004
Messages
33,383
Why not. They did it for businesses under the PPP program. Big and small. 669 billion, I believe. They got to borrow and never have to pay back. Why not help the little guy also?
I'm not too crazy about that idea either.
 

voce

Ideal_Rock
Joined
May 13, 2018
Messages
4,695
@nala the PPP was for the little guy, too. But a lot of little guys decided it wasn't worth the trouble to apply. Including my dad.

Also, just because you do something once or twice, you can always do it again? That is a logical fallacy known as slippery slope. America and the world have yet to come to terms with the consequences of COVID relief bills, including PPP, (there is always a time delay before the consequences of policy is felt in the economic system), and you're looking for the American government to pile on more debt?

Nothing is truly free, and if the government decides to forgive debt, it can only do so by printing more money, and someone somewhere will feel the effect. There will be actual harm done domestically and globally if you understand the importance of the US dollar in global trade.

If you were a middle class retiree with your money in bonds, which is what all financial advisors generally advise, you'd already be hurting with what's happened in the past year. Forgive more loans, and the middle class retirees who worked hard all their life to save up this money would be hurting more.

Student debt forgiveness, and the PPP and stimulus payments already issued is coming out of everyone's pocketbooks in the form of taxes in the future. Government decisions are not magic. There's a price to be paid, and to rush into a decision or judgment thinking there's only pro, no cons, is thoughtless.

I consider myself a moderate, and I haven't made up my mind regarding student debt forgiveness. But, I am a naturally cautious person who thinks it would be unwise for the government to go all in and do too much that may wreck other things. I support spending on infrastructure to convert us to clean energy as higher priority than child support or forgiving student loan debt. There's only so much you can do well, and doing too much at once indicates to me a lack of understanding of how the world really works.
 
Last edited:

nala

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Oct 23, 2011
Messages
5,619
@voce—Im not looking for the government to do anything. OP asked if we would be in favor of loan forgiveness given that some of us will not benefit and that we in fact sacrificed for what others will get free—that is all I responded to. I mentioned all the other instances bc like loan forgiveness, they did not benefit me and yet—I refuse to be bitter about them. And you can sit here and provide reasons against any legislation but I’m really the wrong audience as I have no say. Lol.
 
Last edited:

Dancing Fire

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 3, 2004
Messages
33,383
Also, just because you do something once or twice, you can always do it again? That is a logical fallacy known as slippery slope. America and the world have yet to come to terms with the consequences of COVID relief bills, including PPP, (there is always a time delay before the consequences of policy is felt in the economic system), and you're looking for the American government to pile on more debt?
Yup, The chickens will come home to roost, and it'll be sooner than you think. No such thing as FREE $$$!
 

winnietucker

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 4, 2019
Messages
2,008
For those who sacrificed so much, overcame hardships, and paid off a lot or all of their student loans, would you support the government forgiving student loan debt for others? Or for people whose parents sacrificed so much?

As someone who worked multiple jobs while going to school, started in community college because I knew I wasn’t getting help, gave up the opportunity to do internships (because I couldn’t risk my jobs for something that might be temporary), and then had to move thousands of miles away from my home state to be able to afford life - yes. But it has to also address the underlying issue of the ridiculous cost of college.

Also textbooks with access codes should not be a thing. I once had to pay $300 for a loose leaf textbook with an access code that was worthless after the semester was done. It was for an accounting class I needed and I was not an accounting major. Still salty it cost that much...
 

winnietucker

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 4, 2019
Messages
2,008
Another rant. We need to be realistic about college degrees when telling kids they need to go to college. My mom told me that I absolutely had to get a degree and sure it’s opened doors, but not the doors people said it would. She insisted I get a degree in business so I got a degree in finance. No one has ever been interested in my degree. I remember applying for finance jobs and bend so disappointed with the pay. I ended up working in a different industry. My husband’s got a degree in electrical engineering and his first two job offers out of college were for $12/ hour and $15/ hour. Granted, the job market in our very expensive home state is a joke, but still!
 

qubitasaurus

Brilliant_Rock
Premium
Joined
Dec 18, 2014
Messages
1,397
I agree this is a case by case thing, as every student is different as to what their background is and what they wish to study. It's also a case by case based on school thing. Since I did have to switch majors, and the sticker price on the school where I started at was quite high, of course I also applied to other schools, some of them public. The impression I have of private universities is they were a bit more flexible about what they could offer in terms of financial aid, if you had to negotiate. The public schools had to go by a pretty rigid formula unless there's a sports scholarship. I found the staff at public schools no less sympathetic and willing to help, but there were fewer levers they could pull to help people on an individual basis.

I'm sorry your family had to pay so much for education on a single-parent salary. That situation with the divorce is certainly something that would have gotten consideration, I feel, at the school that I went to. There's quite a variety of private universities out there, from the elite ones who have been around a long time and have large endowments to help students financially to the for-profit ones that are offering little while sucking money from the students and the government. On that end of the spectrum, that's just a trash school, period. No one intelligent would ever enroll there. The only type of private university worth going to would be the elite private institutions with more to offer than good public schools.

On the grad school side, I think it can vary by individual or school, but the big thing is the department. I can honestly say that I have been around, living and socializing with loads of grad students who were making money and graduating debt free with cash to spare even coming from a dirt-poor family. It all depends on what research projects they work on, what projects are getting big funding by private companies and/or government. Grad students involved in important research projects are effectively getting paid as they work through their degree. This is usually in tech and STEM with applications. If you're going for a liberal arts grad degree, the only way you come away debt free is if you're loaded by, say, publishing a best-selling book or getting a MacArthur Genius grant.

Life is always what you make of it, and its always nice when it works out well. I dont think STEM postgrads usually work like this though. From having a pretty strong cross section through this community, Im much more used to the version of events where theyre actually living in a small attic and living off as little (lol as much ramen) as they can. Its even a bit of a pop culture mean on big culture hubs for this community -- like phd commics. When you first read these comics its quite funny. But 15 years later the same commics have a lot of pathos for me. These days (well pre-covid) we'd visit several of these (ivy leagues/oxford/cambridge/tsinghua/big leading insitutes) a year and we would litterally go arround buying people meals -- both postdocs and phd students alike. We did this for a really good reason. The unis were in very expensive areas and quite a few were struggling more than it was immediately apparent they were. They werent eligble for the same conncesions and support as undergrads but the off campus living costs were very high. We would lend people money to cover situtations where their conference registration fees were (almost always) due several months before the conference, but the uni would only reimburse them after they returned; causing them not to have enough to continue to pay rent. In other cases the university would have a contract for 6 months with a postdoc and the money would only begin to arrive on month 5; no international relocation expenses would be subsidized at all and people would begin to lose money for the privledge of working for the ivy league for a few months. We have lost quite a bit of money over the years, trying to just forgive loans we gave people as it was clear we would cause too much hardship by asking to have the money paid back.

They have incredible energy as a group, and I love the enthusiasm, general optimism and inspirarional way in which they tackle things. I hope I get to spend the rest of my life like this/with these people. But their lives arent a cake walk.

Ofcourse most left uni and were immensely successful, this is a very high profile stem field and people generally went into high paying jobs. So it worked out. But most of them will laugh about shit they did to survive their phds with you if you know them well enough and come from that community.
 

seaurchin

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Nov 2, 2012
Messages
2,035
Been there, done that, got the t-shirt, with myself and my kids. And as when our kids were little, no one knows what college will look like in twenty years. It could be mostly online, tax-funded, more students opting for trade schools instead, just about how it is now, or something else.

But what parents or even future parents CAN do right now is just start a regular savings program for it, even if it's just a little bit. I think too often parents get overwhelmed with all the variables, so they don't do anything.

Even if all you can put aside right now is $25 a month in a special savings account for it or US savings bond every month, that's a good start. You can add to or refine your plan next year or beyond. Having something to start with when the time comes is always better than nothing and much more useful than worries.
 

Cerulean

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Sep 13, 2019
Messages
2,474
@Cerulean maybe my experiences are skewed then. My friends at school that got to make money instead of roll in debt were doing their Master's and PhD's in biotech and in computer science. Their research projects were of interest to companies with deep pockets, and being a grad student doesn't prevent them from taking side contractual work on projects just so long as their research was progressing. I think it has less to do with luck and more to do with the fact they were exceptional. The computer science PhD I'm thinking of garnered a lot of support from Google, who sponsored some portion of her expenses getting her degree (she had interned for them before) and also sponsored things like flying her to Switzerland to give talks at a conference.

Oh that makes tons of sense to me given the field and also that they were cream of the crop! Very very cool that Google sponsored your friend's research! Can't get much better than that!

I am also biased given my "sampling" of peers - many of them are in the humanities and fine arts, (DUH - no funded research), and emerging fields in STEM (e.g. data science, human-computer interaction and other computer sciences).

Funny aside...in my corner of STEM, master's degrees are a hug plus, but phds are actually sort of frowned upon in industry...namely because their salary expectations and lack of "real world" experience combined are such a downside. Academic frameworks often don't work very well at many companies even if they are excellent in academia.
 

Cerulean

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Sep 13, 2019
Messages
2,474
But not big business? They are a big beneficiary of American taxpayer largess.
The oil/agricultural/financial industries are the most heavily subsidized programs the US has. It's our only form of true 'socialism'. They are often irresponsible. They get bailed out continually. They use that money not as intended for employee benefit but instead goes to stock buybacks etc. They receive hundreds of millions in loans, sometimes billions, and have them forgiven all the time. It benefits no one but their bottom line.
Our Gov't shovels money at them and has for decades. It has demonstrably hurt us and drained our resources.
I'd rather some of those many billions go to education. It shouldn't be for the rich and it shouldn't be a at the risk of death in war. It shouldn't be potentially ruinous for our youth/families and it shouldn't be at the expense of the arts and humanities by which civilization's metrics are based. Education isn't a zero sum game. It benefits us all.

AMEN!

It just isn't an act of service to mitigate costs of education.

Why would we, as a nation, turn a blind eye as we cripple a large percentage of an entire generation financially? What happens when they can't consume goods as much, or buy real estate, or cars? Or can't afford education for their kids? People will only start to care once it impacts their bottom line...

I can't even wrap my head around people who resent loan forgiveness programs just because they paid off their loans. "Because I suffered, so should you." Why should they other than to satiate your own resentment? Isn't progress a mark of a successful society?
 

Dancing Fire

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 3, 2004
Messages
33,383
I can't even wrap my head around people who resent loan forgiveness programs just because they paid off their loans. "Because I suffered, so should you." Why should they other than to satiate your own resentment? Isn't progress a mark of a successful society?
Progress is not to payoff your debts? :confused: Sorry, but I have a different philosophy when it comes to paying back your debts. You borrowed the money you are the one responsible for paying it back.
 

Asscherhalo_lover

Ideal_Rock
Trade
Joined
Aug 16, 2007
Messages
5,104
Progress is not to payoff your debts? :confused: Sorry, but I have a different philosophy when it comes to paying back your debts. You borrowed the money you are the one responsible for paying it back.

I could be game for this without the EXORBITANT and predatory interest rates. To finish college I was forced to take out loans over 8%. THAT should not be allowed. It should all be at a FIXED low interest rate for as long as it takes you to finish that degree, with no interest accruing until you're out of school and have a job (or a reasonable time frame, a year for instance). Those rates are why I took out maybe 65k and owed over 80 before I even graduated, that amount then got added to my loans before I even had a job in my field. Nightmare fuel. Rates were much lower when I started than when I stopped, I had no control over this and no way to know it was going to happen.
 
Be a part of the community It's free, join today!
    Jewels of the Week: July 2021
    Jewels of the Week: July 2021
    Throwback Thursdays: July 2021
    Throwback Thursdays: July 2021
    August Birthstone 2021 - Peridot
    August Birthstone 2021 - Peridot

Holloway Cut Advisor



Top