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Will you get the Covid 19 Booster vaccine when it is available to you?

Will you get the booster?

  • 1. Yes

    Votes: 162 83.1%
  • 2. No

    Votes: 23 11.8%
  • 3. Undecided

    Votes: 10 5.1%

  • Total voters
    195

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
48,258
The Moderna booster contains 50 mcg of the active ingredient as @dk168 wrote above.
Moderna vaccines one and two contain 100 mcg of the active ingredient.
The Pfizer vaccines (booster or injections one or two) contain 30 mcg of the active ingredient.

More is not necessarily better though, to date, evidence does suggest that Moderna protects a bit better than Pfizer against the Delta variant.




"

Moderna vs. Pfizer: Both Knockouts, but One Seems to Have the Edge​

A series of studies found that the Moderna vaccine seemed to be more protective as the months passed than the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. Here’s why.

It was a constant refrain from federal health officials after the coronavirus vaccines were authorized: These shots are all equally effective.
That has turned out not to be true.
Roughly 221 million doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine have been dispensed thus far in the United States, compared with about 150 million doses of Moderna’s vaccine. In a half-dozen studies published over the past few weeks, Moderna’s vaccine appeared to be more protective than the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine in the months after immunization.
The latest such study, published on Wednesday in The New England Journal of Medicine, evaluated the real-world effectiveness of the vaccines at preventing symptomatic illness in about 5,000 health care workers in 25 states. The study found that the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine had an effectiveness of 88.8 percent, compared with Moderna’s 96.3 percent.
Research published on Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that the efficacy of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine against hospitalization fell from 91 percent to 77 percentafter a four-month period following the second shot. The Moderna vaccine showed no decline over the same period.

If the efficacy gap continues to widen, it may have implications for the debate on booster shots. Federal agencies this week are evaluating the need for a third shot of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for some high-risk groups, including older adults.
Scientists who were initially skeptical of the reported differences between the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines have slowly become convinced that the disparity is small but real.
“Our baseline assumption is that the mRNA vaccines are functioning similarly, but then you start to see a separation,” said Natalie Dean, a biostatistician at Emory University in Atlanta. “It’s not a huge difference, but at least it’s consistent.”
But the discrepancy is small and the real-world consequences uncertain, because both vaccines are still highly effective at preventing severe illness and hospitalization, she and others cautioned.
“Yes, likely a real difference, probably reflecting what’s in the two vials,” said John Moore, a virologist at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York. “But truly, how much does this difference matter in the real world?”

“It’s not appropriate for people who took Pfizer to be freaking out that they got an inferior vaccine.”
Even in the original clinical trials of the three vaccines eventually authorized in the United States — made by Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson — it was clear that the J.&J. vaccine had a lower efficacy than the other two. Research since then has borne out that trend, although J.&J. announced this week that a second dose of its vaccine boosts its efficacy to levels comparable to the others.
The Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines rely on the same mRNA platform, and in the initial clinical trials, they had remarkably similar efficacy against symptomatic infection: 95 percent for Pfizer-BioNTech and 94 percent for Moderna. This was in part why they were described as more or less equivalent.
The subtleties emerged over time. The vaccines have never been directly compared in a carefully designed study, so the data indicating that effects vary are based mostly on observations.
Results from those studies can be skewed by any number of factors, including the location, the age of the population vaccinated, when they were immunized and the timing between the doses, Dr. Dean said.

The Coronavirus Pandemic: Latest Updates

Updated
Nov. 2, 2021, 7:33 p.m. ET

For example, the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was rolled out weeks before Moderna’s to priority groups — older adults and health care workers. Immunity wanes more quickly in older adults, so a decline observed in a group consisting mostly of older adults may give the false impression that the protection from the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine falls off quickly.
Given those caveats, “I’m not convinced that there truly is a difference,” said Dr. Bill Gruber, a senior vice president at Pfizer. “I don’t think there’s sufficient data out there to make that claim.”

But by now, the observational studies have delivered results from a number of locations — Qatar, the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, several other states in the United States — and in health care workers, hospitalized veterans or the general population.
Moderna’s efficacy against severe illness in those studies ranged from 92 to 100 percent. Pfizer-BioNTech’s numbers trailed by 10 to 15 percentage points.
The two vaccines have diverged more sharply in their efficacy against infection. Protection from both waned over time, particularly after the arrival of the Delta variant, but the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine’s values fell lower. In two of the recent studies, the Moderna vaccine did better at preventing illness by more than 30 percentage points.
A few studies found that the levels of antibodies produced by the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine were one-third to one-half those produced by the Moderna vaccine. Yet that decrease is trivial, Dr. Moore said: For comparison, there is a more than 100-fold difference in the antibody levels among healthy individuals.
Still, other experts said that the corpus of evidence pointed to a disparity that would be worth exploring, at least in people who respond weakly to vaccines, including older adults and immunocompromised people.

“At the end of the day, I do think there are subtle but real differences between Moderna and Pfizer,” Dr. Jeffrey Wilson, an immunologist and physician at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville who was a co-author of one such study, published in JAMA Network Open this month. “In high-risk populations, it might be relevant. It’d be good if people took a close look.”
“Pfizer is a big hammer,” Dr. Wilson added, but “Moderna is a sledgehammer.”
Several factors might underlie the divergence. The vaccines differ in their dosing and in the time between the first and second doses.

Vaccine manufacturers would typically have enough time to test a range of doses before choosing one — and they have done such testing for their trials of the coronavirus vaccine in children.
But in the midst of a pandemic last year, the companies had to guess at the optimal dose. Pfizer went with 30 micrograms, Moderna with 100.
Moderna’s vaccine relies on a lipid nanoparticle that can deliver the larger dose. And the first and second shots of that vaccine are staggered by four weeks, compared with three for the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.
The extra week may give immune cells more time to proliferate before the second dose, said Dr. Paul Burton, Moderna’s chief medical officer. “We need to keep studying this and to do more research, but I think it’s plausible.”
Moderna’s team recently showed that a half dose of the vaccine still sent antibody levels soaring. Based on those data, the company asked the F.D.A. this month to authorize 50 micrograms, the half dose, as a booster shot.
There is limited evidence showing the effect of that dose, and none on how long the higher antibody levels might last. Federal regulators are reviewing Moderna’s data to determine whether the available data are sufficient to authorize a booster shot of the half dose.
Ultimately, both vaccines are still holding steady against severe illness and hospitalization, especially in people under 65, Dr. Moore said.

Scientists had initially hoped that the vaccines would have an efficacy of 50 or 60 percent. “We would have all seen that as great result and been happy with it,” he said. “Fast forward to now, and we’re debating whether 96.3 percent vaccine efficacy for Moderna versus 88.8 percent for Pfizer is a big deal.”
"
 

dk168

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jul 7, 2013
Messages
9,226
The latest information I have is that, Pfizer would be the booster of choice for those who have had AZ for the first 2 doses, however, this has yet to be confirmed.

DK :))
 

Bonfire

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Messages
3,771
This is the Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC) of the Moderna vaccine as published in UK:

1635930099574.png

Therefore, 0.25ml would be a half dose containing 50mcg of the active ingredient.

DK :))

Thank you DK
 

diamondringlover

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Dec 12, 2006
Messages
4,137
on Monday I had moderna booster in one arm and flu shot in the other...the flu shot arm started hurting first, then both of my arms hurt, booster shot arm hurt more...I had no fever and I felt fine...on Tuesday I noticed that I would just run out of energy, I would rest for a couple of hours and then be ok and that happened several times during the day, I did not run a fever I was checking...so far today I feel ok my arms still hurt but much more tolerable
 

Dee*Jay

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Mar 26, 2006
Messages
14,082
My first vax was J&J in early April and I just signed up for Moderna (plus a flu shot) next Thursday. Super excited -- ha!

TR has declared he will not take an mRNA vaccine. Claims something to do with the inventor of that type of vax saying he wouldn't take one. Misinformation widely debunked, but it is what it is. I can only manage one person at a time and in this pandemic I choose ME. :cheeky:
 

DAF

Shiny_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jan 7, 2012
Messages
495
Received my Moderna shots in January and February, and my Moderna booster this past Sunday. My arm hurt alot on Monday and Tuesday, and I got the chills and a migraine Monday night, and experienced exhaustion Monday afternoon into Tuesday. Arm is still a bit sore.
 

Matata

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Sep 10, 2003
Messages
8,149
I signed up a few weeks ago and was told when I showed up for my appointment that Oregon hadn't approved the Moderna booster yet with no explanation why they let people sign up for something they couldn't get.

Moderna booster was finally approved at October's end and I have an appointment next Wed. for the booster.
 

lala646

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Nov 4, 2018
Messages
747
I'm with @kenny . Got the Moderna booster mid-day on Saturday. Like the first 2 shots, I had body aches, low grade fever, and exhaustion that started in the evening and lasted about 24 hours. By Monday morning I was right as rain, aside from the achy arm which has only stopped hurting as of today.
 

DiaLuv

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Feb 9, 2011
Messages
157
The Moderna booster contains 50 mcg of the active ingredient as @dk168 wrote above.
Moderna vaccines one and two contain 100 mcg of the active ingredient.
The Pfizer vaccines (booster or injections one or two) contain 30 mcg of the active ingredient.

More is not necessarily better though, to date, evidence does suggest that Moderna protects a bit better than Pfizer against the Delta variant.




"

Moderna vs. Pfizer: Both Knockouts, but One Seems to Have the Edge​

A series of studies found that the Moderna vaccine seemed to be more protective as the months passed than the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. Here’s why.

It was a constant refrain from federal health officials after the coronavirus vaccines were authorized: These shots are all equally effective.
That has turned out not to be true.
Roughly 221 million doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine have been dispensed thus far in the United States, compared with about 150 million doses of Moderna’s vaccine. In a half-dozen studies published over the past few weeks, Moderna’s vaccine appeared to be more protective than the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine in the months after immunization.
The latest such study, published on Wednesday in The New England Journal of Medicine, evaluated the real-world effectiveness of the vaccines at preventing symptomatic illness in about 5,000 health care workers in 25 states. The study found that the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine had an effectiveness of 88.8 percent, compared with Moderna’s 96.3 percent.
Research published on Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that the efficacy of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine against hospitalization fell from 91 percent to 77 percentafter a four-month period following the second shot. The Moderna vaccine showed no decline over the same period.

If the efficacy gap continues to widen, it may have implications for the debate on booster shots. Federal agencies this week are evaluating the need for a third shot of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for some high-risk groups, including older adults.
Scientists who were initially skeptical of the reported differences between the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines have slowly become convinced that the disparity is small but real.
“Our baseline assumption is that the mRNA vaccines are functioning similarly, but then you start to see a separation,” said Natalie Dean, a biostatistician at Emory University in Atlanta. “It’s not a huge difference, but at least it’s consistent.”
But the discrepancy is small and the real-world consequences uncertain, because both vaccines are still highly effective at preventing severe illness and hospitalization, she and others cautioned.
“Yes, likely a real difference, probably reflecting what’s in the two vials,” said John Moore, a virologist at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York. “But truly, how much does this difference matter in the real world?”

“It’s not appropriate for people who took Pfizer to be freaking out that they got an inferior vaccine.”
Even in the original clinical trials of the three vaccines eventually authorized in the United States — made by Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson — it was clear that the J.&J. vaccine had a lower efficacy than the other two. Research since then has borne out that trend, although J.&J. announced this week that a second dose of its vaccine boosts its efficacy to levels comparable to the others.
The Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines rely on the same mRNA platform, and in the initial clinical trials, they had remarkably similar efficacy against symptomatic infection: 95 percent for Pfizer-BioNTech and 94 percent for Moderna. This was in part why they were described as more or less equivalent.
The subtleties emerged over time. The vaccines have never been directly compared in a carefully designed study, so the data indicating that effects vary are based mostly on observations.
Results from those studies can be skewed by any number of factors, including the location, the age of the population vaccinated, when they were immunized and the timing between the doses, Dr. Dean said.

The Coronavirus Pandemic: Latest Updates

Updated
Nov. 2, 2021, 7:33 p.m. ET

For example, the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was rolled out weeks before Moderna’s to priority groups — older adults and health care workers. Immunity wanes more quickly in older adults, so a decline observed in a group consisting mostly of older adults may give the false impression that the protection from the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine falls off quickly.
Given those caveats, “I’m not convinced that there truly is a difference,” said Dr. Bill Gruber, a senior vice president at Pfizer. “I don’t think there’s sufficient data out there to make that claim.”

But by now, the observational studies have delivered results from a number of locations — Qatar, the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, several other states in the United States — and in health care workers, hospitalized veterans or the general population.
Moderna’s efficacy against severe illness in those studies ranged from 92 to 100 percent. Pfizer-BioNTech’s numbers trailed by 10 to 15 percentage points.
The two vaccines have diverged more sharply in their efficacy against infection. Protection from both waned over time, particularly after the arrival of the Delta variant, but the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine’s values fell lower. In two of the recent studies, the Moderna vaccine did better at preventing illness by more than 30 percentage points.
A few studies found that the levels of antibodies produced by the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine were one-third to one-half those produced by the Moderna vaccine. Yet that decrease is trivial, Dr. Moore said: For comparison, there is a more than 100-fold difference in the antibody levels among healthy individuals.
Still, other experts said that the corpus of evidence pointed to a disparity that would be worth exploring, at least in people who respond weakly to vaccines, including older adults and immunocompromised people.

“At the end of the day, I do think there are subtle but real differences between Moderna and Pfizer,” Dr. Jeffrey Wilson, an immunologist and physician at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville who was a co-author of one such study, published in JAMA Network Open this month. “In high-risk populations, it might be relevant. It’d be good if people took a close look.”
“Pfizer is a big hammer,” Dr. Wilson added, but “Moderna is a sledgehammer.”
Several factors might underlie the divergence. The vaccines differ in their dosing and in the time between the first and second doses.

Vaccine manufacturers would typically have enough time to test a range of doses before choosing one — and they have done such testing for their trials of the coronavirus vaccine in children.
But in the midst of a pandemic last year, the companies had to guess at the optimal dose. Pfizer went with 30 micrograms, Moderna with 100.
Moderna’s vaccine relies on a lipid nanoparticle that can deliver the larger dose. And the first and second shots of that vaccine are staggered by four weeks, compared with three for the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine.
The extra week may give immune cells more time to proliferate before the second dose, said Dr. Paul Burton, Moderna’s chief medical officer. “We need to keep studying this and to do more research, but I think it’s plausible.”
Moderna’s team recently showed that a half dose of the vaccine still sent antibody levels soaring. Based on those data, the company asked the F.D.A. this month to authorize 50 micrograms, the half dose, as a booster shot.
There is limited evidence showing the effect of that dose, and none on how long the higher antibody levels might last. Federal regulators are reviewing Moderna’s data to determine whether the available data are sufficient to authorize a booster shot of the half dose.
Ultimately, both vaccines are still holding steady against severe illness and hospitalization, especially in people under 65, Dr. Moore said.

Scientists had initially hoped that the vaccines would have an efficacy of 50 or 60 percent. “We would have all seen that as great result and been happy with it,” he said. “Fast forward to now, and we’re debating whether 96.3 percent vaccine efficacy for Moderna versus 88.8 percent for Pfizer is a big deal.”
"

Missy, thank you for the informative vaccination post. You are a very level headed person and reports only the facts.
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
48,258
Missy, thank you for the informative vaccination post. You are a very level headed person and reports only the facts.

Thank you @DiaLuv I very much appreciate your kind comments.
My goal is to present the facts as accurately as possible and hopefully others can take the facts and make good decisions.
 

ForteKitty

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Oct 7, 2004
Messages
5,220
Got my booster in early Oct (Pfizer x3- no reaction but had bursts of energy and increased senses) My husband got his booster last night (Pfizer1&2- mild & medium reaction, Moderna 3-so far mild reaction). My son is scheduled for his first shot this sunday! We have a ton of trips with long plane rides planned for 2022 so we're very excited he's finally eligible.
 

Petalouda

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Mar 27, 2016
Messages
362
My experience here is anecdotal. I received my second Pfizer shot in April. 3 weeks ago I got a case of break-through Covid. My little brother had gone out with friends ( he was recently vaccinated with J&J) and got it. But while he was still asymptomatic we had a small birthday celebration for him. It was my little brother, me and my husband and our two kids, and my older brother, his wife and two kids. My little brother gave it to me and my older brother ( vaccinated with Moderna) ( I guess he kept it in the blood family!).

Thankfully nobody else got Covid but it was NOT a fun experience. I felt crummy and still don’t really have my smell back. My brothers felt pretty bad too. The vaccine did its job however in protecting our lungs. None of us had bad coughing spells and I hardly coughed at all. Also the emotional part of getting Covid was the worst. I called everyone I was in contact with and let them know and I was worried sick I may of passed it on to them. Thankfully everyone was fine and nobody got it but the feeling I may of infected someone else really weighed on me.

I will absolutely get my booster when I'm eligible to. My husband too. This is not a fun virus and though the vaccine may not always be 100%, it does do it’s job most of the time in preventing severe Covid. I can’t imagine what it would of been like without some sort of protection.
 

Austina

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Feb 24, 2017
Messages
5,958
I had my 2 doses of Pfizer in February and April, and although the booster here (Tx) was 65 and overs a couple of weeks ago, when I checked this week and put in my details, they accepted me for the booster.

I’ve got my appt on Tuesday afternoon for a 3rd shot of Pfizer.
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
48,258
I had my 2 doses of Pfizer in February and April, and although the booster here (Tx) was 65 and overs a couple of weeks ago, when I checked this week and put in my details, they accepted me for the booster.

I’ve got my appt on Tuesday afternoon for a 3rd shot of Pfizer.

YAY! Happy for you @Austina. :appl:
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
48,258
The importance of Boosters especially in the immunocompromised.

mRNA Vaccine Protection Varies Among Immunocompromised Patients​

By Reuters Staff
November 04, 2021




(Reuters) - Among people with impaired immune systems, some get less benefit than others from the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines, and new data help clarify the differences and supports the need for extra shots.
Researchers studied roughly 20,000 immunocompromised adults - 53% of whom were fully vaccinated - and nearly 70,000 with normal immune systems (immunocompetent), 43% of whom were fully vaccinated. Overall, the vaccines' efficacy against hospitalization for COVID-19 was 90% in the immunocompetent group. That dropped to 77% in those with conditions that weaken their immune system, regardless of age.
But efficacy ranged from 59% among transplant recipients, who take anti-rejection medicines, and 74% among blood cancer patients to 81% among people with rheumatologic or inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, the researchers reported in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
Statistically, the vaccines from Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna were similarly effective, said Peter Embi, Chief Executive of Regenstrief Institute in Indianapolis.

"Our study supports the CDC recommendations that two-doses of the mRNA vaccines aren't enough," he told Reuters. "People with suppressed immune systems who are getting either mRNA COVID-19 vaccine should get three doses of either one, and then a booster six months later."
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
48,258
My experience here is anecdotal. I received my second Pfizer shot in April. 3 weeks ago I got a case of break-through Covid. My little brother had gone out with friends ( he was recently vaccinated with J&J) and got it. But while he was still asymptomatic we had a small birthday celebration for him. It was my little brother, me and my husband and our two kids, and my older brother, his wife and two kids. My little brother gave it to me and my older brother ( vaccinated with Moderna) ( I guess he kept it in the blood family!).

Thankfully nobody else got Covid but it was NOT a fun experience. I felt crummy and still don’t really have my smell back. My brothers felt pretty bad too. The vaccine did its job however in protecting our lungs. None of us had bad coughing spells and I hardly coughed at all. Also the emotional part of getting Covid was the worst. I called everyone I was in contact with and let them know and I was worried sick I may of passed it on to them. Thankfully everyone was fine and nobody got it but the feeling I may of infected someone else really weighed on me.

I will absolutely get my booster when I'm eligible to. My husband too. This is not a fun virus and though the vaccine may not always be 100%, it does do it’s job most of the time in preventing severe Covid. I can’t imagine what it would of been like without some sort of protection.

I am glad you had the first two doses because as you wrote that very likely helped you greatly. Thank goodness you are OK and may the rest of your recovery go smoothly.
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
48,258
FYI. I found this very interesting.

"The mix-and-match study also suggested some modest benefits with mixed boosters among those who had received mRNA vaccines. For instance, for people fully vaccinated with Moderna, a Pfizer booster increased antibody titers about 10-fold compared to 8-fold with Moderna (the increase was only 5-fold with J&J). Similarly, for people fully vaccinated with Pfizer, a Moderna booster increased antibody titers about 17-fold compared to 15-fold with Pfizer (the increase was only 6-fold with J&J). Keep in mind that the Moderna booster dose used in this study was the regular Moderna vaccine (100 mcg), which is twice the dose of the booster (50 mcg) authorized for use by the FDA, while the Pfizer dose remains the same (30 mcg) for its booster. There is ongoing research on the effectiveness of 50-mcg Moderna booster (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04889209). Side effects of the boosters were similar to those reported with the primary series of the respective vaccine, although the study was too small and short-term to evaluate rare side effects (Latmar, medRxiv 2021 — preprint)."


Who is eligible for the booster dose?

"
For people who received Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, the following groups of people are eligible to be administered a booster shot at least six months after the two-dose series (CDC Expands Eligibility for COVID-19 Booster Shots, 10-21-21):

  • People 65 and older
  • People 18 or older with medical conditions that make them more likely to get severely ill from COVID-19, such as obesity, smoking (current or former use), heart conditions, diabetes, chronic liver diseases, and others (full list here). Schizophrenia and mood disorders have been added to this list by the CDC based studies that showing that among people with COVID-19, those with schizophrenia had 2.7 times the chance of dying as those without schizophrenia (Nemani, JAMA Psychiatry 2021), and those with mood disorders (e.g. depression or bipolar disorder) had a 31% higher chance of being hospitalized and a 51% higher chance of dying compared to those without (Ceban, JAMA Psychiatry 2021).
  • People 18 and older living in long-term care settings (e.g., skilled nursing facilities, inpatient psychiatric or substance abuse settings, assisted living facilities, etc.)
  • People 18 and older who work in high-risk settings. Occupations at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure include:

    • First responders (healthcare workers, firefighters, police, congregate care staff)
    • Education staff (teachers, support staff, daycare workers)
    • Food and agriculture workers
    • Manufacturing workers
    • Corrections workers
    • U.S. Postal Service workers
    • Public transit workers
    • Grocery store workers"
 

rainydaze

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
May 1, 2007
Messages
3,150
I got my booster last week - Pfizer x3. I might have liked to get Moderna for this one, however I was happy to just get the booster and Pfizer was the easiest presentation.

I got the flu vax at the same time, in the other arm. The flu vax arm was a ton more sore and it lasted longer than the soreness in the Covid arm. Other than sore arms, I had a pretty bad headache that night and a bit more (slight) fatigue the next couple of days. My son had a booster too and he was out for a two days with fever, chills, and heavy fatigue.
 

dk168

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jul 7, 2013
Messages
9,226
Booster booked for Wednesday 17 November 2021, not locally in my town, but another town 17 miles away that I frequent.

I shall go for a meal and do some shopping while I am up that way to make it worth my while.

According to the information provided, I shall get a booster dose with another brand different to the AZ that I had.

DK :))
 

SparklieBug

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Feb 23, 2013
Messages
451
DH recently had his booster. First shot was AstraZenca; second was Moderna. The clinic had Pfizer vaccines, then the (retired) doc that administered the booster suggested having Moderna for the third one, rather than have three different vaccines. DH is on ongoing immune-suppressing meds.

His flu shot bothered him more than the COVID booster vaccine.
 

Lookinagain

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
May 15, 2014
Messages
2,066
DH recently had his booster. First shot was AstraZenca; second was Moderna. The clinic had Pfizer vaccines, then the (retired) doc that administered the booster suggested having Moderna for the third one, rather than have three different vaccines. DH is on ongoing immune-suppressing meds.

His flu shot bothered him more than the COVID booster vaccine.

Not mixing three different Covid vaccines, kind of makes sense to me. I don't think I've seen any articles on it but could have missed them.

Funny about the flu shot this year. Seems it is bothering people more than normal. It definitely bothered me and it never has in the past.
 

Calliecake

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jun 7, 2014
Messages
8,012
I received the Moderna booster. All the shots I had were Moderna. The pharmacist said the booster was half the dose of the regular Moderna vaccines. I felt really bad during the night and the next day after the booster. It was worse than the second shot. DH only had a sore arm from the booster.

I felt fine after the flu shot.

It’s so weird how these vaccines affect everyone differently.
 

cvalier26

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jun 14, 2020
Messages
255
I got the first two Pfizer shots and I'm definitely getting the booster. I'm relatively young and not at risk for covid but I see it as a public health responsibility. As far as I know there is no risk (except exceptions) and only benefits from a third shot, but I may be wrong
 

Austina

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Feb 24, 2017
Messages
5,958
Had my booster shot of Pfizer a couple of hours ago, and so far, no ill effects.

The pharmacist said there hasn’t been a great take up of the booster here in Tx, so DS & DDIL are booking their boosters now too.
 

Dee*Jay

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Mar 26, 2006
Messages
14,082
I was boosted about five hours ago! My original appointment was tomorrow but I ended up going today. So far so good! I go the flu shot at the same time and my arm is slightly sore if I move it a lot, but that's about it. Fingers crossed!!!
 

Austina

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Feb 24, 2017
Messages
5,958
Injection site is a bit tender, but otherwise still all good.
 

JulieN

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jul 25, 2005
Messages
13,351
I'm going to make a booster appointment now that mood disorders got added to underlying conditions.

An co-workers wife got a bad breakthrough case. I'm concerned that this Delta wave we've been in since summer hasn't abated as strongly as I expected it to, and I was planning on doing holiday traveling.
 
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