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Will you get the Covid 19 Booster vaccine when it is available to you?

Will you get the booster?

  • 1. Yes

    Votes: 162 83.1%
  • 2. No

    Votes: 23 11.8%
  • 3. Undecided

    Votes: 10 5.1%

  • Total voters
    195

Matata

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Sep 10, 2003
Messages
8,141
Got my Moderna booster yesterday. Had no side effects with first 2 shots. My arm is slightly tender today and I'm tired and slightly nauseous.
 

nala

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Oct 23, 2011
Messages
5,792
Hubby and I, 2 sisters and their hubbies all for boosters last night at 6 pm. No side effects except for soreness in arms. Will update if anything changes. Would have enjoyed feeling fatigued or sleepy but no such luck. Ugh.
 

Bibbi*Jazzy*T

Rough_Rock
Joined
Nov 11, 2021
Messages
86
Definitely will get my booster vaccine when it becomes available.
Live in Canada.
Have had the Astra Zeneca for my first dose and the Pfizer for the second dose.
Am in my 60's.
Even though I don't look it.
The Covid-19 virus can change at any time.
The different variants for instance.
So in my honest opinion the booster shot is a great idea.
 

mommylawyer

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jan 27, 2020
Messages
448
I got my Pfizer booster yesterday morning, and so far my only side effect is a sore arm. I was surprised that the Pfizer burned a little when I got the injection. The AZ shots didn't hurt at all during the injection process, but I had a sore arm with those two doses as well.
 

MamaBee

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Mar 31, 2018
Messages
11,532
Hubby and I, 2 sisters and their hubbies all for boosters last night at 6 pm. No side effects except for soreness in arms. Will update if anything changes. Would have enjoyed feeling fatigued or sleepy but no such luck. Ugh.

Me too @nala..I was thinking it was because I’m older. I read it doesn’t matter if we get a reaction but I still wanted one. Did you take your temp today? I took mine the next afternoon. I was slightly warmer than usual..
Which vaccine did you get?
 

nala

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Oct 23, 2011
Messages
5,792
Me too @nala..I was thinking it was because I’m older. I read it doesn’t matter if we get a reaction but I still wanted one. Did you take your temp today? I took mine the next afternoon. I was slightly warmer than usual..
Which vaccine did you get?

I took mine and nothing. I just wanted to feel sleepy bc I love sleeping but lately I don’t sleep much—I think it’s my lovely perimeno stage in life. Reaction has nothing to do with effectiveness—I’ve been teaching 5 sets of 30 to 40 kids in a classroom since August—many unvaccinated—vaccine works, lol. Not to mention that I tested this vaccine in NOLA in June, Chi in July and Vegas and several casinos since. Countless parties and dining indoors. So you are good! Reaction or not! Consider yourself lucky for not experiencing serious reactions. I know that I do.
 
Last edited:

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
48,241
How long will the booster last?

Boosters are a hot topic now, and our inbox is full of questions about them, especially this one: How long will they last?

But before we answer that, we should clarify who in the U.S. is currently recommended to get boosters and why. As of Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said you are eligible for a booster if you:
  • Are 18 and older and received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine more than two months ago
  • Received either the Pfizer or Moderna mRNA vaccine and are 65 or older
  • Received either the Pfizer or Moderna shot and are 18 or older and have underlying medical conditions, live in a long-term care facility or work in high-risk settings
“Some of us need boosters for two reasons. The first is that the protection against mild and moderate illness provided by the initial vaccination appears to wane over time, especially among older individuals,” says Jessica Justman, an epidemiologist at Columbia University.
“The second reason is that the delta variant is more infectious. This means everyone, even vaccinated people, is more likely to get exposed to an infectious dose of the virus and have it challenge their immune system. The booster helps your immune system mount an effective response.”
mail

Joe Biden receives a third dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine at the White House in September.
Photographer: Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images
Some states, such as California and Colorado, have opened up booster shots to all adults who are at least six months past their second mRNA dose. It may turn out that the term “booster” is a bit of a misnomer, and that the correct number of shots for maximum efficacy isn’t yet known. Vaccination recommendations often change as more data becomes available over time.
“It’s a good idea to keep an eye on CDC guidance,” says Justman.

Now on to the question of how long boosters will last. That’s a tough one.
It’s possible, says Justman, that the months-long gap between initial doses of the vaccine and boosters will help the immune system maintain a strong response for a much longer period than the initial regimen did. But we need more data to have any sort of definitive answer on that, she says.
Monica Gandhi, an infectious disease expert at the University of California, San Francisco, says it’s important to keep in mind that even without a booster shot, the vaccines are still providing strong protection.
“The vaccines are doing an amazing job in preventing severe disease, even through the delta variant,” she says.
Thanks to all of you for writing in this week! Next Sunday, we'll be answering the best question we receive again. So if you have any, we want to hear from you. Write to us at [email protected]—Kristen V. Brown

Track the virus​

Economies Need More Than Vaccines to Recover

The path out of the pandemic continues to defy straight-line forecasts. The hope was that getting the virus under control by vaccinating a large percentage of the population would turbocharge an economic recovery. Now we know it’s not that simple. As the chart below shows, countries with pre-pandemic challenges haven’t escaped them, Bloomberg Businessweek reports.
mail
 

Karl_K

Super_Ideal_Rock
Trade
Joined
Aug 4, 2008
Messages
12,057
at long last scheduled for Thursday for the pfizer booster and the flu shot.
Decided to stick with pfizer because of the mild side effects I had with the first 2 and its a full dose.
 

jaysonsmom

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Mar 13, 2004
Messages
4,323
I got my booster last night, and got the flu shot along with it. No reactions from either except for sore arm.
 

Lula

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Messages
4,606
6 months after your second dose

We are rolling out boosters happily too but we're going to wait and see how overseas kids fare before we jab ours.

Unvaccinated kids are a major cause of spread within households. In the US, 900 children have died from Covid and countless others have lingering after effects from the disease. In the UK, unvaccinated adolescents are believed to be the cause of the most recent Delta surge. The vaccine poses far less risk than contracting the disease. Why would anyone risk their child contracting and spreading a novel virus over a safe vaccine. I just don’t get it.
 

seaurchin

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Nov 2, 2012
Messages
2,374
Unvaccinated kids are a major cause of spread within households. In the US, 900 children have died from Covid and countless others have lingering after effects from the disease. In the UK, unvaccinated adolescents are believed to be the cause of the most recent Delta surge. The vaccine poses far less risk than contracting the disease. Why would anyone risk their child contracting and spreading a novel virus over a safe vaccine. I just don’t get it.

I think one main reason is that there's been so much deliberate misinformation put out there by certain leaders that a lot of people are just genuinely misguided about it.
 

mellowyellowgirl

Ideal_Rock
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Joined
May 17, 2014
Messages
4,826
Unvaccinated kids are a major cause of spread within households. In the US, 900 children have died from Covid and countless others have lingering after effects from the disease. In the UK, unvaccinated adolescents are believed to be the cause of the most recent Delta surge. The vaccine poses far less risk than contracting the disease. Why would anyone risk their child contracting and spreading a novel virus over a safe vaccine. I just don’t get it.

Err the wait and see is actually from our government not my family personally! There are no vaccines available for Aussie 5-11 yr olds right now. Our government wants to see if any overseas kids drop off from the vaccine because the study sample in kids is very small.
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Jun 8, 2008
Messages
48,241
The only way to end this pandemic (and just let it become endemic) is to vaccinate everyone who can get vaccinated. Period. So tired of all the myths and falsehoods spreading all over this country and world.
Spin it however you want but that's what it comes down to.
Like it or not.
Agree or not.
It's a fact.



"
Epidemics do not require the total eradication of the disease to end. More important than the existence of the disease, is the harm it is causing the population. But will the harms of COVID-19 ever be low enough? Will the epidemic ever end?

In short: Yes, it will - so long as enough people get vaccinated and vaccine efficacy continues to protect people from severe illness with new variants.

The pandemic’s end

This won’t happen with a bang. What we can expect to see is a fading-away. Waves might well still continue, and even increase in magnitude. But fatalities will reduce and severe illness become less common as vaccination rates improve.

Whereas diseases become epidemics and pandemics through purely biostatistical means – a matter of how many people are infected and where those people are – they end once the biomedical harms they cause are sufficiently reduced. In other words, when relatively few people are getting seriously ill.

There are currently multiple vaccines that are extremely effective in reducing the effects of the virus from a life-threatening disease, to (for the vast majority of people) nothing more than a mild cold.

Even in the face of further waves of infection, were the entire population fully vaccinated, the biomedical harm the disease would cause would be (relative to many diseases we are already dealing with) sufficiently low to call an end to the epidemic.

This would mark the point at which governments could stop implementing many of the economically and socially devastating non-pharmaceutical interventions.

How far down the road are we?

The answer to this question depends on which country you’re living in.

If you are in Europe, you’re closer than those of us living in an African country.

Despite the initial shortages, South Africa currently has more than enough vaccines to satisfy demand. Initially, the slow roll out might have been blamed on supply issues, but now the country faces one big problem: not enough people are choosing to vaccinate.

The scourge of disinformation and anti-vax propaganda has people afraid to accept these life-saving vaccines. All too often, this ends in tragedy.

A call to arms

Unfortunately, it is quite natural to listen to anecdotal evidence and take it seriously – to think that because “Uncle Richard” took the vaccine and then had a heart attack, the vaccine caused the heart attack. But this is not good evidence of a causal relationship.

Evidence-based medicine is routed in large-scale randomized trials, with many thousands of people participating (and now, many millions have taken the vaccine).

Both the trials and now large-scale roll-outs have conclusively shown that vaccines massively reduce people’s chances of hospitalization and death, and further, that by all standard measures of pharmaceutical safety, that they are not harmful.

The only way to prevent healthcare systems being periodically clogged up with suffering COVID-19 patients, and to end this epidemic, is to ensure that as many people as possible are vaccinated, and as soon as possible.

"
 

Lula

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Messages
4,606
Err the wait and see is actually from our government not my family personally! There are no vaccines available for Aussie 5-11 yr olds right now. Our government wants to see if any overseas kids drop off from the vaccine because the study sample in kids is very small.

My apologies, @mellowyellowgirl. One of the things I like best about PS is the large number of non-US members. When replying to your post, I should have remembered that you're in Australia.

The response to the pandemic has indeed varied widely due to the choices each country (and in the case of the US -- each state) has made. This splintered response has prolonged the pandemic and delayed distribution of the vaccine globally. I'm furious that the US sits on an enormous amount of vaccines yet so many of our citizens continue to engage in magical thinking and succumb to conspiracy theories related to Covid and the vaccine. All while much of the rest of the world continues to wait to receive their first dose. It's immoral.

My DH and I have both received our boosters. Side effects were sore arm and fatigue, similar to the first and second doses.
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
48,241

Track the vaccines​

More Than 7.52 Billion Shots Given

In total, 98 doses have been given for every 100 people around the world—but the distribution has been lopsided. Countries and regions with the highest incomes are getting vaccinated more than 10 times faster than those with the lowest. We’ve updated our vaccine tracker to allow you to explore vaccine rates vs Covid cases in a number of countries. See the latest here.
 

wildcat03

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Apr 11, 2011
Messages
808
I'm 23 hours from my Moderna booster (original vaccine was Moderna as well). So far I feel ok. Hoping that if I do feel crummy it will be overnight.
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
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Jun 8, 2008
Messages
48,241
NY opened up boosters to pretty much everyone so DH will get his soon! He had Pfizer so he's going to try and get Moderna for the booster.

CVS is the one holdout. They refuse to waver from federal guidelines so if anyone plans on getting the booster who isn't eligible re federal guidelines do not go to CVS.
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Jun 8, 2008
Messages
48,241
I'm 23 hours from my Moderna booster (original vaccine was Moderna as well). So far I feel ok. Hoping that if I do feel crummy it will be overnight.

Hope you are feeling A OK today @wildcat03!
 

Asscherhalo_lover

Ideal_Rock
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CVS is the one holdout. They refuse to waver from federal guidelines so if anyone plans on getting the booster who isn't eligible re federal guidelines do not go to CVS.

Interesting! We scheduled at CVS online with no issues. And that's where I got my full Moderna in August. I guess we'll see when he goes on Saturday.
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Jun 8, 2008
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48,241
Interesting! We scheduled at CVS online with no issues. And that's where I got my full Moderna in August. I guess we'll see when he goes on Saturday.

I just saw this update on ABC news this morning. Maybe they’ll just give it to him if they don’t ask too many questions. But if he’s not eligible according to federal guidelines CVS’s official stance is they won’t be giving the booster to anyone not eligible under the federal guidelines and aren’t following NY and NJ protocols.








The conflicting state-level and federal policies put pharmacies in a tricky spot. Even as some states encourage all adults to get booster shots, large national pharmacy chains like CVS and Walmart say they have to abide by the federal rules.
“We understand that some states may expand the criteria for COVID-19 boosters, but our participation in the Federal Pharmacy Program requires us to follow recommendations from the CDC,” Joe Goode, a spokesman for CVS Health said in an email. “In line with that guidance, we are relying on self-attestation from patients with regards to their qualifying conditions as outlined in the agency’s recommendation and guidance.”
 

Asscherhalo_lover

Ideal_Rock
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missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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lilmosun

Ideal_Rock
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CVS is the one holdout. They refuse to waver from federal guidelines so if anyone plans on getting the booster who isn't eligible re federal guidelines do not go to CVS.

They are relying on self-attestation (you checking the box saying you meet the criteria when you sign up). No one is going to ask you to prove what qualification you have to meet the criteria.
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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48,241
They are relying on self-attestation (you checking the box saying you meet the criteria when you sign up). No one is going to ask you to prove what qualification you have to meet the criteria.

Yes I know that. But some of us don’t want to purposefully mislead. YMMV. There are many pharmacies who will give the booster to any adult so no need to go to CVS or Walmart. JMO.
 

Asscherhalo_lover

Ideal_Rock
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Yes I know that. But some of us don’t want to purposefully mislead. YMMV. There are many pharmacies who will give the booster to any adult so no need to go to CVS or Walmart. JMO.

Do you know which ones? Walgreens seems to have the same question on their site. CVS is the main pharmacy chain by me.
 
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