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Will you get the Covid 19 Booster vaccine when it is available to you?

Will you get the booster?

  • 1. Yes

    Votes: 178 84.0%
  • 2. No

    Votes: 23 10.8%
  • 3. Undecided

    Votes: 11 5.2%

  • Total voters
    212

Gloria27

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Nice try but you started this by ignorantly stating that children wanting Covid vaccines meant they were "brainwashed."

Trying to label responding to that nonsense with facts "alarmist" or "spreading anxiety" is just more nonsense.

Hopefully you will smarten up rather than learn the hard way. But the only way to try to correct the terrible, rampant disinformation campaign that has caused millions more Covid deaths than necessary and counting, is for people to keep answering to those falsehoods with accurate information, even though the one stating the falsehoods will usually not like being called out, at the time at least. Have a nice day, Gloria.
To smarten up would actually mean to get my PhD ;-) which I might.
Wonder if you have one or/and you just assume things and throw insults around.
 

missy

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This is more a vent, but I do expect to get a booster when I can, and I'm vaccinated.

I just came back from a work trip to Phoenix, AZ.

I hail from Chicago so had a rude awakening about how cavalier everyone was even in a big city...so much so that 99% of people I saw did not bother to wear masks anywhere. The only mask wearers were not white, go figure.

I was expected to go to the office and do work-related outings with colleagues. I foolishly assumed they were taking reasonable precautions at the workplace. No proof of vaccines, no survey, no masks, nothing.

Multiple people on my team flew in from other cities across the country and were extremely uncomfortable. I was really upset that my manager didn't mention it to us. The whole trip was illuminating about the company's culture.

I have since gotten quite sick and was obviously worried about COVID-19. Home tests were negative but I am so frustrated with my company for putting me and other colleagues at risk.

It won't be the only reason, but I intend to look for a new job.

I am so sorry @Cerulean
It is truly mind boggling how selfish, ignorant and otherwise disappointing some people are behaving. I’m looking at many differently now. Not in a good way. So freaking SELFISH and ignorant. :(


I will add that my DH’s company wants people back in the office in January. Heck no. Given how people cannot be trusted I’m happy for him to just quit/retire. If he can’t work from home that’s that. Nothing is more precious than our health and the health of our loved ones. PERIOD.
 

Cerulean

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I am so sorry @Cerulean
It is truly mind boggling how selfish, ignorant and otherwise disappointing some people are behaving. I’m looking at many differently now. Not in a good way. So freaking SELFISH and ignorant. :(


I will add that my DH’s company wants people back in the office in January. Heck no. Given how people cannot be trusted I’m happy for him to just quit/retire. If he can’t work from home that’s that. Nothing is more precious than our health and the health of our loved ones. PERIOD.

Thank you for your kind words. It’s baffling

My husband is already back in the office one day a week. My mom is dealing with requirements too. They started asking people to start back months ago. Her job actually let her go because they she moved to a smaller town during the pandemic as she expected not to be in the office again. Luckily she found a new job - I think it’s better or worse depending on the industry :(
 

Gloria27

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No, it is selfish asking the young to risk side effects and their long term health in order to "protect" those who have lived most of their lives or/and didn't care about their health until now. That is the definition of selfishness and ignorance!
 

missy

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No, it is selfish asking the young to risk side effects and their long term health in order to "protect" those who have lived most of their lives or/and didn't care about their health until now. That is the definition of selfishness and ignorance!

Wow.
I will let your post speak for itself. Which it does in volume. ::)
 

Lookinagain

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No, it is selfish asking the young to risk side effects and their long term health in order to "protect" those who have lived most of their lives or/and didn't care about their health until now. That is the definition of selfishness and ignorance!

You do know that many children and young adults who get Covid (even if asymptomatic) end up with long haul syndrome, right? So Covid often impacts their long term health. Avoiding Covid is the the goal, even for young people, and being vaccinated is the best known defense. I don't know why you don't understand that.
Ignorance is a lack of knowledge or information. If the shoe fits, wear it.

 

missy

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You do know that many children and young adults who get Covid (even if asymptomatic) end up with long haul syndrome, right? So Covid often impacts their long term health. Avoiding Covid is the the goal, even for young people, and being vaccinated is the best known defense. I don't know why you don't understand that.
Ignorance is a lack of knowledge or information. If the shoe fits, wear it.


You can’t fix someone’s thinking…someone who is determined to be ignorant and argumentative. @Gloria27 isn’t interested in the facts. She’s made that painfully clear.
 

Gloria27

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You can’t fix someone’s thinking…someone who is determined to be ignorant and argumentative. @Gloria27 isn’t interested in the facts. She’s made that painfully clear.
If only I lived for your approval!
not worth my time, bye!
 
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missy

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byeemoji.png
 

Ella

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Folks, no name calling please.
 

missy

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Missy, thanks for starting these threads and posting updates on Covid information. There will always be a few who don't get it but I know there are far more people reading these threads than posting on them so you never know how much positive impact they really have. :)

Thank you @seaurchin. It really is the main reason I keep posting info about Covid. I know there are many who read and don't post and I know many do care about facts. I appreciate all your posts too. You add so much to pricescope. <3
 

missy

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For those who are interested in the topic of children and Covid.

www.medscape.com

More Children Contracted COVID-19 and Died in September

More than 6 million children have tested positive for COVID-19 since the beginning of the pandemic, with more than 1.1 million new cases recorded in September alone.
www.medscape.com

"

More Children Contracted COVID-19 and Died in September, Data Shows​

Carolyn Crist
October 18, 2021


"
Editor's note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape's Coronavirus Resource Center.
September was the worst month for new COVID-19 cases and deaths among children in the U.S., according to new data from the American Academy of Pediatrics.
Cases peaked in early September, the data shows, as many schools reopened for in-person classes while the contagious Delta variant surged across the country.
More than 6 million children have tested positive for COVID-19 since the beginning of the pandemic, with more than 1.1 million new cases recorded in September alone.

Last week, there were more than 148,000 new cases, and children made up about a quarter of all new COVID-19 cases in the country.

Only a small number of young children contract severe COVID-19 or die. Weekly data shows that COVID-19 deaths for ages 15 and under reached its highest level in September, with 41 deaths.
Vaccinations for young children could begin in the coming weeks, according to NBC News. Last week, Pfizer requested FDA emergency use authorization for its COVID-19 vaccine for ages 5-11. An FDA advisory committee will discuss the authorization on Oct. 26, and the CDC's vaccine advisory committee is scheduled to meet on Nov. 2.
The White House has told governors to prepare for child vaccinations to begin as early as November, NBC News reported.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has also said that pediatricians should start preparing to vaccinate children, according to a new article released Thursday. Doctors will need to use new vials to administer the 10-microgram dose to kids, which is one-third of the dose given to adults. Pediatricians and pharmacies will soon be able to order the pediatric vaccine through their jurisdictions, the AAP said.
Jurisdictions should know by next week how many doses of the Pfizer pediatric vaccine they will be receive so they can start planning the distribution, the AAP said. Federal authorities have indicated that there will be enough vaccines for all children in the 5-11 age group to receive a shot.
About 46% of 12- to 17-year-olds in the U.S. are fully vaccinated, the AAP said.
SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Children and COVID-19: State-Level Data Report." "Pediatricians can start preparing to vaccinated children against COVID-19."

NBC News: "Data shows more children are getting sick and dying from Covid."

"
 

Lula

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No, it is selfish asking the young to risk side effects and their long term health in order to "protect" those who have lived most of their lives or/and didn't care about their health until now. That is the definition of selfishness and ignorance!
@Gloria27, I read your thread about turquoise (I'm a turquoise lover, too) and you seem like an interesting and intelligent person. I've been reading a number of comments on various sites similar to yours. My own students said something similar at the beginning of the pandemic: "We've been told the pandemic won't affect young people, so we don't see a reason to change our behavior." I'm wondering if you and others expressing similar sentiments realize that what you're not-so-subtly hinting at is eugenics. My guess is no, that's not your intent. However, the longer people continue to reject the vaccine and masks and basic common sense related to airborne disease transmission, the more innocent lives (children, elderly, immunocompromised) lives we sacrifice on the alter of...what exactly? We had a chance to emerge from the pandemic kinder, gentler beings, but didn't take that opportunity. I don't think people understand that "endemic covid" is an expensive and tragic outcome for the U.S. and the rest of the world. "Endemic Covid" means we need to have open discussions about what number of deaths from Covid-19 are acceptable to our society each year? 0? 10,000? 100,000? We need to discuss what level of illness and deaths our medical system realistically handle? And who will pay for that care? In the U.S., health insurance is tied to one's employer, and people routinely go bankrupt from serious illness and hospitalizations. Expect to hear more about that as people who survive a Covid hospitalization realize that insurance is not longer required to cover all medical costs related to the disease. How will our economies and medical systems cope with upwards of 12 million people with long Covid? These are the questions being asked now by epidemiologists as we roar past 700,000 deaths in the U.S. alone. If you don't think that endemic Covid will be a drain on your pocketbook, health, and quality of life -- no matter which country you live in -- you might want to think again.
 

Lula

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No one should care what "who" says.
They are way to compromised by China.

My point was is it to much to ask for the WH, cdc and Fauci to be on the same messaging?
I am not talking about changing over time I was talking about 3 different messages at the same time.

Then is you add the ones in it for the money like the vaccine producers its even more messy.

@Karl_K -- I agree with you on the confusing and changing messaging. This has been an ongoing issue from the beginning of the pandemic. You can only blame "the science changes so the messaging needs to change" for some of the confusion. I have a degree in public health and am a health educator and there have been many days that I have stared at the news in disbelief over the latest contradiction in health messaging. The worst messaging by far was when the CDC director proudly (and, sadly, prematurely) proclaimed that "vaccinated people can take off their masks" in May of 2021
https://www.msnbc.com/transcripts/transcript-rachel-maddow-show-5-13-21-n1267352
despite the fact that the Delta variant was surging in India and it was only a matter of time until it spread to the rest of the globe!
https://www.journalofinfection.com/article/S0163-4453(21)00387-X/fulltext
The CDC was irresponsible and it cost lives and added fuel to the mask-or-no-mask debate. Foolish, irresponsible health messaging. Almost immediately, Micheal Osterholm, Peter Hotez, and other respected MDs and epidemiologists tried to correct this error, but it was too late. Just tragic. That woman should have been fired.
 

Lula

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Sheesh -- sorry for the typos in my above posts. Too late to edit ;-)
 

seaurchin

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I would just add to the above that people in the CDC, WHO, Dr. Fauci etc. making some errors or not always being in alignment in a fast changing situation like this does not mean that they should be disregarded as a reliable source imo.

They are not perfect but they are still the best. The ones who would have us disregard them are the ones who should be disregarded themselves, if not prosecuted when their career position is one that causes people to believe them (dirty politicians for ex).
 
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Lula

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I would just add to the above that people in the CDC, WHO, Dr. Fauci etc. making some errors or not always being in alignment in a fast changing situation like this does not mean that they should be disregarded as a reliable source imo.

They are not perfect but they are still the best. The ones who would have us disregard them are the ones who should be disregarded themselves, if not prosecuted when their career position is one that causes people to believe them (dirty politicians for ex).

Great points, @seaurchin
 

Austina

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It’s very disappointing that some people think those of us who’re over 60 have ’had’ our lives so we shouldn’t be ‘forcing’ younger people to curtail theirs. Even more ridiculous that we didn’t care about our health until now, what on earth is that assumption based on? There’s enough evidence out that that younger people are getting seriously ill, or even sadly dying from Covid. If everyone had done their part from the word go, we’d be in a very different place now. I despair that there are still people who don’t think Covid is a big deal, or that somehow their actions don’t impact others.

DH had his booster shot today and so far is feeling absolutely fine.
 

missy

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It’s very disappointing that some people think those of us who’re over 60 have ’had’ our lives so we shouldn’t be ‘forcing’ younger people to curtail theirs. Even more ridiculous that we didn’t care about our health until now, what on earth is that assumption based on? There’s enough evidence out that that younger people are getting seriously ill, or even sadly dying from Covid. If everyone had done their part from the word go, we’d be in a very different place now. I despair that there are still people who don’t think Covid is a big deal, or that somehow their actions don’t impact others.

DH had his booster shot today and so far is feeling absolutely fine.

I wish her comments were not deleted though egregious as they were just because it showed all who read them exactly who she is. Though I do agree with Ella. And do not question her actions. This person's name and her delusional thoughts are not even worth commenting further on... Truly to think someone thinks like that is mind boggling. Forget that children are dying of Covid but everyone's life is valuable. No one deserves to get sick and/or die from this disease. No one. My goodness she would have been an asset to you know who during WWII. :(

So glad Colin got his booster and I hope you can get it soon. (((Hugs))) @Austina.

I am hoping all who are doing what they can to help end this pandemic remain safe and well.
And sending good wishes to everyone. I do not want anyone to get sick or worse. I wish everyone good health. Every single person even those who don't care about others. I care about everyone no matter how crazy I sound now lol. I cannot help it. I want everyone to stay safe and be OK.
We had a chance to emerge from the pandemic kinder, gentler beings, but didn't take that opportunity.

Exactly Lula. This adds even more heartbreak to the heartbreak of Covid. We had a great opportunity to show, as a society, as a civilization, we are kind and gentle and caring and loving. Instead, unfortunately, the opposite came true from the actions of many and their behavior. Selfishness, ignorance and uncaring behavior. And you are right in that the cost of lives will continue through the years from this decision not to get vaccinated. Innocent people will continue to lose their lives. People we love and care about and yes young people too. No one is immune or exempt from this disease. :(
 

missy

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truetestofcivilization.jpg
 

Matata

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I just scheduled my booster for Sunday. Thanks to @junebug17 for posting the FDA approval in the covid update thread.
 

missy

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FDA Greenlights 'Mix and Match' COVID Boosters​

— Moderna, Johnson & Johnson boosters also get thumbs up​

by Molly Walker, Deputy Managing Editor, MedPage Today October 20, 2021


FDA EUA Booster dose of Moderna and Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines over a photo of the two vaccines and a transfer symbo


The FDA authorized booster doses of Moderna and Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccines and also authorized a "mix and match" or heterologous approach to boosters for all three available vaccines (including Pfizer's) in the indicated populations, the agency announced on Wednesday.
Ultimately, the FDA went with what was recommended by their advisory panel, the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC), which voted for a half-dose Moderna booster in adults ages 65 and up, adults ages 18-64 at high risk of severe COVID, and adults 18-64 with frequent occupational and institutional exposure to SARS-CoV-2, at least 6 months after completing the primary series.

A booster of Johnson & Johnson vaccine is authorized for all adults ages 18 and up who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, at least 2 months after completion of the single-dose regimen.
For the heterologous boosters, the agency specified that they are authorized for "eligible individuals." These individuals may receive a booster dose of a different vaccine than their primary series "with a different available COVID-19 vaccine" if they are among the populations indicated for boosters, given at the same recommended interval (after 2 months if Johnson & Johnson was the primary vaccine, or after 6 months for Moderna or Pfizer).
The agency also clarified the Pfizer booster emergency use authorization (EUA), for the 18-64 population at high occupational or institutional risk, to more closely align with the language in the Moderna booster EUA.
At a media briefing Wednesday evening, Acting FDA Commissioner Janet Woodcock, MD, said the agency was not making "preferential recommendations" on boosters, and said that "we would expect many people will get the same series they have already received."

FDA's Director for the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Peter Marks, MD, PhD, added that he expected individuals would consult with their healthcare providers if they had a question about which booster to receive.
"In some situations, there may be an issue with availability or medical considerations that a provider may decide" to recommend a certain booster "for a certain individual," he said.
Woodcock added that some individuals may want another vaccine as a booster due to an adverse reaction to the primary series.
"We wanted to provide a lot of flexibility, because some people don’t know which vaccine they got," she said.
Some members of VRBPAC had expressed interest in making boosters available to all adults as young as age 40, which was echoed by several reporters, who wondered why the agency didn't issue a broader recommendation for boosters.

Woodcock said they were monitoring breakthrough infections and waning immunity in different populations. She described it as a "dynamic situation."

Marks added that the FDA is "relatively nimble" with their EUA authority, and they could act as soon as they needed to, should the situation change.
"There is evidence to suggest that lowering the age of those eligible for boosters may make sense in the future," he said.
Data to support the Moderna booster EUA came from a phase II trial, P201. Overall, 149 adults who received the two-dose 100 μg series (the dose authorized under EUA) plus the 50 μg booster dose were evaluated for immunogenicity.
The data for Johnson & Johnson's booster dose was even thinner, with four trials submitted and only part of one independently reviewed by the FDA. However, the agency statement noted that the reason for the EUA was "based on the FDA's evaluation of immune response data in 39 participants from a clinical trial including 24 participants who were 18 through 55 years of age and 15 participants who were 65 years of age and older" who received a booster dose about 2 months after their first dose and "demonstrated a booster response."
For the "mix and match" EUA, the agency cited data from a pre-print, presented by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, that showed heterologous boosters produced an immune response, with no new safety concerns.




FDA authorizes booster shots of Moderna, Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccines​

By Helen Branswell and Matthew Herper Oct. 20, 2021


moderna syringes



Many Americans who have been vaccinated against Covid-19 will soon be able to choose which vaccine they would like as a booster after the Food and Drug Administration issued emergency authorizations Wednesday that throw open the door to mixing and matching of vaccine brands.

In newly issued emergency use authorizations for the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines — and in a revision to the previous authorization of the Pfizer and BioNTech booster — the agency made clear that people do not have to get a third dose that matches their primary series.

“The available data suggest waning immunity in some populations who are fully vaccinated,” acting FDA Commissioner Janet Woodcock said in a statement. “The availability of these authorized boosters is important for continued protection against Covid-19 disease.”



Final approval of this booster strategy rests with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which must sign off on this plan before it can become U.S. policy. The CDC’s expert panel on vaccines, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), meets to discuss the booster authorizations Thursday and will make recommendations to CDC Director Rochelle Walensky. Walensky’s signoff is needed to put the policy into play.




The authorizations will allow tens of millions of Americans to get Covid booster shots and — in a fundamental change of policy — effectively choose their booster. People in certain demographics who received the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine six months ago or more have been able to seek a Pfizer booster since late September. But with authorization of the Moderna and J&J boosters, people who got those vaccines too can seek a booster if, in the case of the Moderna vaccine, six months have elapsed since their second shot, and in the case of the J&J, two months have gone by since they received the single J&J jab.

The move will also give states much needed flexibility for their vaccination rollouts, effectively allowing teams of vaccinators to bring one type of shot to a nursing home, for example, rather than requiring them to try to match booster jabs to the vaccine brand each resident initially received.

But Woodcock acknowledged that messaging the different timings of boosters and the sizes of the doses — the Moderna booster shot contains half the antigen of a full Moderna job — could be confusing for the public. She said, though, that health care providers and pharmacies will be given charts to help them keep things straight.

“Although it is not simple, it also is not utterly hopelessly complex,” Peter Marks, director of FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, said on a call with reporters Wednesday evening.


Kathryn Edwards, a vaccines expert at Vanderbilt University, applauded the decision to allow people to get a so-called heterologous boosting — following up one type of vaccine with another. “The mRNA vaccines are more immunogenic than the adeno-vectored vaccines,” like the J&J shot, Edwards said in an email. “If people had been given the J&J vaccine first they can now get an mRNA vaccine. It is likely that their immune response to the mRNA vaccine will be greater than if the booster were with the same J&J vaccine.”

For people who initially received the Pfizer and Moderna shots, boosters are, for now, available only to people aged 65 and older, people aged 18 to 64 with health conditions that put them at high risk of developing severe illness if they catch Covid, and people aged 18 to 64 whose jobs or living circumstances put them at high risk of contracting Covid. The latter group includes health care workers and teachers, as well as people living in or working in homeless shelters and prisons. Boosters are recommended for all of those who received the J&J vaccine, on the other hand.

Marks noted that the FDA is monitoring data on breakthrough infections and could move soon to lower the age at which all adults become eligible for a booster, regardless of their health conditions or occupational exposures to Covid.

The Biden administration had originally stated that boosters would be available for all vaccinated Americans; President Biden got his booster shot earlier this month. But the expert panels that advise the FDA and the CDC did not agree that the available evidence points to a need for boosters for healthy adults under the age of 65 at this point, except for those who received the J&J vaccine. Even with the restrictions they recommended, however, about 60% of people 18 to 64 meet the criteria for a booster at this point, Amanda Cohn, a CDC vaccines expert who sits on the FDA advisory committee, said last week.


Although the EUAs as issued suggest people may have free rein over what vaccine they get as a booster, the FDA officials said they expect the situation will not unfold in such a free-wheeling fashion.

“We would expect many people will continue to get the same series that they already received,” Woodcock said on the call with reporters. Marks added on the call that the agency wanted to make sure that people who couldn’t get the same shot, who believed they’d had a reaction to the earlier vaccine, or who didn’t know which vaccine they originally received would still get a booster.

Studies have suggested that using different types of vaccines could create a better and more long-lasting immune response. That appeared especially true with the J&J vaccine; following it up with a dose of one of the messenger RNA vaccines elicited substantially higher antibody levels, a study funded by the National Institutes of Health recently revealed.

But despite some discussion at a meeting last Friday of the FDA’s vaccines advisers, the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC), the FDA did not stipulate that people who got the one-dose J&J vaccine should receive an mRNA shot rather than another J&J jab as a booster. Instead, the authorization suggested people who got the J&J shot can opt for a Moderna half-dose booster or a full-dose Pfizer booster if they wish. Likewise, people who got one of the mRNA vaccines could choose to get the other mRNA vaccine as a booster, or the J&J jab.

Studies also suggest that the order and type of shots a person receives could influence how effective a booster will be. And Barney Graham, the former deputy director of the National Institutes of Health’s Vaccine Research Center, told STAT in September that the vaccine one gets as a first or priming dose “locks you into a repertoire and a pattern of antibody, T-cell balances that carry on through subsequent boosters.”

But when asked why the FDA did not give any guidance on which sequence of vaccines would be preferable, Woodcock and Marks said it was because at this point, those data aren’t available.

“You’re talking about antibody responses and we really don’t know the connection between that and actually how well protected somebody is,” Woodcock said. Marks said it is conceivable that a booster shot that doesn’t boost antibody levels to the height of another might still result in longer and stronger protection. “Because we don’t have those data right now … we have to be non-committal about what is the best,” he said. “And we have to simply say that any one of these combinations is reasonable.”

Woodcock and Marks were asked about the decision to allow people who received the J&J vaccine initially to be boosted with Moderna’s shot, given that it is a half dose. The arm of the NIH-funded mix and match trial studied a full dose of Moderna after the J&J shot. Marks said it would be too confusing to have one version of the Moderna booster for J&J recipients and another for people who got the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines. And he suggested “multiple lines of evidence” point to the Moderna vaccine as being an adequate booster, adding data suggests the half dose shot boosts antibodies to about three-quarters of the level that a third full dose would do.


Language added to the fact sheets provided to health care professionals about each vaccine says the shots “may be administered as a heterologous booster dose following completion of primary vaccination with another authorized or approved COVID-19 vaccine.” The language does not appear to offer any preference at all for having people receive a booster of their original vaccine.

It remains to be seen if the CDC — on the advice of the ACIP — turns that permissive recommendation into a preferential one, urging people who got the J&J vaccine to get an mRNA dose as their booster shot. The committee has been concerned for some time about the situation people who got the J&J’s one-and-done vaccine find themselves in, given that the vaccine is less effective than the mRNA vaccines at protecting against Covid infection.

Marks also told reporters on the call that the FDA believed, apparently based on data from Israel, that the risk of a side effect called myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart, did not appear to be higher after an mRNA vaccine booster dose than with earlier doses of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccines. “In fact the profile was much more like the first dose,” he said, “and if you look globally at some other emerging evidence that seems to be the trend.”
 

Gloria27

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I wish her comments were not deleted though egregious as they were just because it showed all who read them exactly who she is. Though I do agree with Ella. And do not question her actions. This person's name and her delusional thoughts are not even worth commenting further on... Truly to think someone thinks like that is mind boggling. Forget that children are dying of Covid but everyone's life is valuable. No one deserves to get sick and/or die from this disease. No one. My goodness she would have been an asset to you know who during WWII. :(

How dare you! You were the one saying the unvaccinated should be marked or separated (although you used another word) so everyone should be able to stay away. Do I need to dig that up and repost?

Who said anyone deserves to die? Who?
I only said deaths median age is very high and maybe it's not worth jabbing the kids because of side effects. If I were old I would worry less about side effects and more about staying alive, so yes, I would most likely take the jab myself.

You are not gentle, you are not kind, you are only virtue signaling.
 

missy

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How dare you! You were the one saying the unvaccinated should be marked or separated (although you used another word) so everyone should be able to stay away. Do I need to dig that up and repost?

Who said anyone deserves to die? Who?
I only said deaths median age is very high and maybe it's not worth jabbing the kids because of side effects. If I were old I would worry less about side effects and more about staying alive, so yes, I would most likely take the jab myself.

You are not gentle, you are not kind, you are only virtue signaling.

Huh? Lol Gloria you keep getting all the facts wrong. You’re on a roll. You called me a name in another post having to do with a certain generation and you got that wrong too. If you call someone names try to get the facts right. Unfortunately that post got deleted as did my response to you since I quoted you. But yes, you are batting a thousand.

And you did say that "old people lived most of their lives and didn't care about their health until now".
Untrue and brutal. Most of the (elderly and other) people I know always cared about their health and ate well and lived healthfully. But you know all the old people and you know best Gloria. And what about the immunocompromised? And the children? Do they deserve protection from this virus? Or is it every man, woman and child for themselves?
No, it is selfish asking the young to risk side effects and their long term health in order to "protect" those who have lived most of their lives or/and didn't care about their health until now. That is the definition of selfishness and ignorance!

Your behavior here is unkind, cruel and ignorant.
I am done responding to you out of respect for PS and Ella.
I will let your posts speak for themselves. They reveal who you are quite well.
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
48,883
Back to facts.




A nurse administers the COVID-19 vaccine to a young girl covering her eyes and holding a teddy bear.

The Biden administration is moving full-steam ahead to prepare the nation to give the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine (Comirnaty) to children ages 5 to 11, in anticipation of an FDA decision in the coming weeks, the White House COVID-19 Response Team announced.
"We have secured vaccine supply to vaccinate every child ages 5 through 11, and as soon as the vaccine is authorized by the FDA, we will begin shipping millions of ... doses nationwide," said White House COVID-19 Response Coordinator Jeffrey Zients, during a press conference on Wednesday morning. In total, the administration has procured enough doses of the vaccine for 28 million children, he said.

As soon as the FDA has authorized the vaccine in children and the CDC has weighed in, the administration plans to ship 15 million doses in the first week of that decision, "with millions more going out each and every week" after that, Zients added.
Twenty-five thousand pediatricians and other primary care providers have already been enrolled to help deliver shots, and the administration will be making the vaccine available at "tens of thousand of local pharmacies" and "hundreds of community health centers," he noted.
The administration is also helping over 100 children's hospitals set up vaccination sites, and collaborating with the Children's Hospital Association to support faith-based and community organizations in hosting vaccination events, and bringing together pharmacies and local school districts to set up clinics in schools, he noted.
"By sending vaccines to pediatricians, pharmacies, community health centers, and rural health centers, working with children's hospitals to host vaccination sites -- including on nights [and] weekends -- helping schools stand up vaccination clinics, and deploying mobile clinics to meet families where they are, we will ensure that vaccinations for kids ages 5 through 11 are easy, convenient, and accessible to every family," Zients said.

With regard to other logistics, he explained that the administration worked with Pfizer to "modify the packaging" to ensure that the vaccines could be delivered by pediatricians and in the offices of other primary care providers.
Vaccines will be shipped along with all of the necessary supplies and will include smaller needles for children, he noted.
Zients acknowledged that some parents may still have questions about the vaccines, and for that reason the administration is focused on "empowering messengers they trust such as local pediatricians and family doctors."
U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, MD, MBA, announced plans for a national public education campaign to "meet parents where they are."
"We will work with schools to send letters home to parents. We will convene doctors in health clinics and support them in delivering vaccinations as soon as they have conversations with families," he said.

Murthy also mentioned plans to share "materials and tool kits" with faith leaders that can be shared with their congregations and to launch forums for parents to ask questions of experts.

Not all children have regular access to a pediatrician or primary care provider and for that reason the COVID-19 Community Corps, which boasts over 16,000 members, will help to reach those families as will other groups that have "built trust with parents"over the years, including Head Start, the National Parent Teacher Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Children's Hospital Association, he said.
Asked whether the administration was once again getting ahead of the science, Zients responded, "not at all."
The administration is "operationally ready, but the decision on the authorization is clearly with the FDA and the CDC," he said. "This is a best practice. This is the right way to do things."
Zients recalled how under the previous administration, when vaccines were initially authorized for emergency use in adults, "the system wasn't ready to actually put shots in arms... It took 12 weeks, back at the end of 2020 and into 2021 ... to get enough supply out into the field to vaccinate half of the eligible adult population. So we'll be doing all of that upfront, with millions of more doses," he said.

Asked whether vaccine authorization would affect masking in schools, CDC Director Rochelle Walensky, MD, said it would take time to bring vaccinations to scale and that going into the winter months, "we cannot be complacent."
"So right now, we are going to continue to recommend masks in all schools for all people in those schools," she said.

"
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
48,883

A daily roundup of news on COVID-19 and the rest of medicine​

by Ian Ingram, Managing Editor, MedPage Today October 21, 2021

Pfizer announced the first data from its phase III COVID-19 booster trial involving 10,000 individuals ages 16 and up. The study showed 95.6% efficacy (95% CI 89.3-98.6) for those who received a booster shot 6 months following their primary series: with five cases in the boosted group versus 109 in the non-boosted group.

After a flurry of COVID-19 vaccine booster authorizations, sources are saying the FDA isn't done and may soon authorize additional shots for all individuals 40 and up. (CNN)

More reassurance that COVID-19 vaccination does not increase risk for miscarriage. (New England Journal of Medicine)

As of Thursday at 8 a.m. EDT, the unofficial U.S. COVID-19 toll reached 45,220,057 cases and 731,271 deaths, up 79,837 and 2,958, respectively, from this time yesterday.

This total includes over 130,000 new cases among kids for the week ending October 14, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Experts are saying long-COVID in children is a cause for concern. (Fortune)

Lower-income countries may see better access to Merck's COVID-19 pill thanks to a $120-million boost from the Gates Foundation. (Bloomberg)

CDC's latest data show that 77.3% of eligible individuals (ages 12 and up) have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, while more than two-thirds are fully vaccinated.
 

mommylawyer

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jan 27, 2020
Messages
456
Did anyone over 40 get very nauseous with the Pfizer booster?

I got AZ for my first two shots, and I had no side effects. My daughter had some nausea after her second Pfizer, but I read that it's worse for the younger crowd. I'm thinking about getting my Pfizer booster when I am back in the states for the holidays but I don't want to ruin my vacation.

Anyone get very sick with their Pfizer booster?
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
48,883
Did anyone over 40 get very nauseous with the Pfizer booster?

I got AZ for my first two shots, and I had no side effects. My daughter had some nausea after her second Pfizer, but I read that it's worse for the younger crowd. I'm thinking about getting my Pfizer booster when I am back in the states for the holidays but I don't want to ruin my vacation.

Anyone get very sick with their Pfizer booster?

My sister did. She is over 40 and she got all three Pfizer vaccines. She got sick with the second and the third. She ran a fever of 102 and was nauseous. But after 24 hours she was almost all better. She did it on a weekend so she would be off from work and she said she was glad she did it that way. Good luck with your booster.
 
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