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what is involved with recutting a stone

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hem01

Rough_Rock
Joined
Jan 23, 2009
Messages
32
I occassionally read posts about people sending their stones to be recut. I have several questions.

1. why do they recut the stone: get rid of inclusions? improve cut (i.e. to excllent or ideal)?
2. is it financially feasible
3. can the cutter anticipate the end product. i.e. a GIA report would change from very good to ideal, SI2 to SI1, etc
4. Is it common to recut

thanks.
 

Lorelei

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 30, 2005
Messages
42,064
Date: 3/12/2009 11:50:23 AM
Author:hem01
I occassionally read posts about people sending their stones to be recut. I have several questions.

1. why do they recut the stone: get rid of inclusions? improve cut (i.e. to excllent or ideal)?
2. is it financially feasible
3. can the cutter anticipate the end product. i.e. a GIA report would change from very good to ideal, SI2 to SI1, etc
4. Is it common to recut

thanks.
1) Usually to improve the optics and beauty of the diamond, sparkle. Not all diamonds are suitable
candidates for recutting apparently but I understand this is not often the case.

2) Yes it can be.

3) I think to a certain extent yes, from what I understand as a consumer. I think the cutter can plan to the best of his
ability but nothing is guaranteed. One of the experts can explain and give much better advice on this.

4) I have seen PSers do so a few times, cut is a huge topic here, in the real world maybe having a diamond recut is quite
unusual and probably not everyone would even know it could be done or bother if they did know.
 

oldminer

Ideal_Rock
Trade
Joined
Sep 3, 2000
Messages
6,363
Often cutting is required due to damage on the existing stone. The downside for a consumer is the risk of breakage is carried by the owner of the diamond, not the cutter. What if you can''t even recognize your old diamond when it comes back to you recut? Will you wonder if someone pulled a fast one on you?

I find it very difficult to accept recut or repair cutting on consumer owned diamonds. the risk of breakage can''t be paid by the rather low fees for recut work. The risk of an accusation of switching outweighs any profit motive.

Cutters can very well define hoped for outcomes and usually meet with a high level of success, but the "but" is a big stumbling block for most folks. I hope you can see why. We can improve a diamond, fix damage, make it sparkle more, etc, etc. However, we are at risk for all sorts of problems both financial and with our reputations. It is a problem which I have not found a great solution for.
 

Judah Gutwein

Shiny_Rock
Trade
Joined
Dec 16, 2008
Messages
320
Lorelei pretty much sums it up.

Cutters will never give you an exact 'approximation' for the simple reason that they are not doing the actual grading and therefore do not wish to be 'on the hook' where even a slight variance in a color/clarity grade can have a significant impact on market value and on your wallet.

Remember, GIA/AGS (and in no particular order) who are considered to be the 'standard bearers' of the industry, are extremely stringent with respect to their grading criteria. Therefore, as much as the cutter will try to extrapolate the resultant carat/color/clarity, there can be some variability and certainly with respect to color and clarity, which are (by definition) subjective on the part of the individual grader.

In fact, you can have a grader look at the very same stone, twice and give it a different color/clarity grade (1 grade differential being considered within reason of course..).

To this end, it is only 'common' to recut, when there can be a high(er) probability guestimate as to the outcome of the re-cutting on the diamond.

Your best bet, is to speak to the vendor you purchased your diamond from (?) and explore your options by asking them some pointed questions and by ascertaining their confidence in their ability to meet your objectives. Keep in mind that there are usually 3 concerned parties involved here; you, the vendor and the actual cutter.

The cutter is only responsible to the vendor and only the vendor is responsible to you. This working dynamic will sometimes make it difficult for the vendor to accept responsibility without certain assurances from the cutter and vice - versa. You need to be aware of this, in order to get an appreciation for what is involved here. There are liability issues etc. For these reasons, your safest bet is usually to approach the person whom you bought the diamond from in the first place.

Best of luck!
 

shady71

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
Messages
153
Date: 3/12/2009 11:50:23 AM
Author:hem01
I occassionally read posts about people sending their stones to be recut. I have several questions.

1. why do they recut the stone: get rid of inclusions? improve cut (i.e. to excllent or ideal)?
2. is it financially feasible
3. can the cutter anticipate the end product. i.e. a GIA report would change from very good to ideal, SI2 to SI1, etc
4. Is it common to recut

thanks.
I had my diamond recut recently. It went from a lifeless, steep/deep 2.47 carat to a gorgeous 2.10. Recutting did nothing to change the inclusions, but the color did come up better once the excess weight was trimmed from the pavillion. Once the stone was initially analyzed, I knew what to expect in regard to finished weight. My recut was done by Brian Gavin and I could not be happier with the results.

See my threads regarding the recut at https://www.pricescope.com/community/threads/planning-to-have-diamond-recut-part-two.104056/ and
https://www.pricescope.com/community/threads/my-recut-is-done.105443/ for all the details complete with before and after specs & photos.
 

Modified Brilliant

Brilliant_Rock
Trade
Joined
Mar 24, 2005
Messages
1,481
We have had diamonds recut for clients with good to great results.
I usually get "a vision" of what I believe the diamond will look like after recutting.
I emphasize the direction of focus to my cutter and what I expect the outcome to be.
Sometimes, I''m hoping for an ideal or excellent cut and finish with a very good cut instead.
My feeling with recutting is: keep your expectations low and be pleasantly surprised.

www.metrojewelryappraisers.com
 
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