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Color appearance of mounted stone

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solange

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In a recent post on appraisals it seems that according to some appraisers, a stone that is graded for color unmounted and from the bottom can vary in appearance to an expert by as much as 3 or more colors when mounted.

Since no one wears an unmounted stone, would you want to pay for,say a G color when you can possibly get a J color stone that, when mounted, faces up like a G. Apparently there is a difference between stones of the same color grade once they are mounted. This did not seem to take cut quality into consideration--only the difference in stones of the same color grade facing up differently when mounted.
This may explain why some people say their J stones face up white and others say they can see color after an F or G.

If this is the case, I am not concerned about all the gadgets and instruments to determine color. I am most interested in the way the stone faces up when mounted. If you could get a much larger stone or save a bundle by purchasing a lower color stone that faces up as well or better than a higher color stone, would you care about the actual grade or about the face up appearance?
 

sylvesterii

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under the same logic then, a G would face up like an E, so if you purchased a G, it would still face up lighter than the J...
 

solange

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Date: 12/12/2005 11:37:57 AM
Author: sylvesterii
under the same logic then, a G would face up like an E, so if you purchased a G, it would still face up lighter than the J...
No. This is not the case. As I understand it, different stones of the same color grade can face up differently.
This does not mean that each color would face up lighter. It means that some Js would face up as a J and other stones graded J would face up like a G or H. It seems to vary with the stone in that not all stones of the same color grade face up the same when mounted.
Since this is the case, would you be more concerned about the actual color grade or the color it faces up when mounted?
 

Lorelei

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Date: 12/12/2005 11:29:25 AM
Author:solange
In a recent post on appraisals it seems that according to some appraisers, a stone that is graded for color unmounted and from the bottom can vary in appearance to an expert by as much as 3 or more colors when mounted.

Since no one wears an unmounted stone, would you want to pay for,say a G color when you can possibly get a J color stone that, when mounted, faces up like a G. Apparently there is a difference between stones of the same color grade once they are mounted. This did not seem to take cut quality into consideration--only the difference in stones of the same color grade facing up differently when mounted.
This may explain why some people say their J stones face up white and others say they can see color after an F or G.

If this is the case, I am not concerned about all the gadgets and instruments to determine color. I am most interested in the way the stone faces up when mounted. If you could get a much larger stone or save a bundle by purchasing a lower color stone that faces up as well or better than a higher color stone, would you care about the actual grade or about the face up appearance?
Good question Solange, I used this logic when I purchased my large L and am still amazed at how ICY WHITE it looks face up in most lights! I am more concerned with the face up appearance when mounted than the actual colour grade, this for me means rounds though. As we know a great cut can make all the difference and all diamonds and colour grades are not created equal.
 

cinnabar

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Date: 12/12/2005 11:29:25 AM
Author:solange

If you could get a much larger stone or save a bundle by purchasing a lower color stone that faces up as well or better than a higher color stone, would you care about the actual grade or about the face up appearance?
Nope. I have no interest at all in a larger stone, so that''s not a factor for me. And it''s like "mind clean" vs "eye clean" when it comes to colour, I want a "mind white" diamond, which means D-E-F (preferably D).

Besides, I wanted a fancy and they show colour more than rounds, mounted or unmounted.

Maybe I''m unusual, but it''s important to me that my diamond look white from the sides as well as face up, so the "it looks white face up" deal isn''t good enough for me.
 

oldminer

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Color grading gemologically requires an unset diamond to be graded in proper lighting. Once a diamond is in a setting or viewed under non-gemological lighting, all bets on appearance are off.

If you buy a fine white color, you will possibly lower its apparent color by setting it into yellow gold. If you buy an I color, you may make it look a little better when setting it in rhodium plated white gold or platinum. Once we get to J color, it is difficult to really fool expert eyes although it does happen.

Many men''s rings are set with L/M color diamonds, yet they still look very nice and white enough. The yellow of the man''s mounting masks the diamond''s color from your eyes. The eys are not discrete measuring tools, but blend what they see, to an extent.

Mounted diamonds often look quite different than their actual color grade, but it is very much light dependent and als mounting color and type dependent.
 

denverappraiser

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You’re arguing that the color grading scale has too many steps and that what is being graded (the saturation of color as viewed from the pavilion under specialized lights) isn’t what customers find important. Both of these are valid points and I think they generally cause people to under-appreciate ‘low’ color stones. By the way, HRD and several of the other major European labs grade color face up for this very reason.


Which raindrop is the one that makes it a storm?


Neil Beaty
GG(GIA) ISA NAJA
Professional Appraisals in Denver
 

Mara

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for me no it does not really matter, then again i have owned a G and an H and a J and to me face up they all look the same basically. it's only from the sides that i could see some change in color to this J but not from the G to H remotely. the J i have now is pretty colorless looking to me even from the side unless i really stare at it or if i feel inclined to put it against a white paper.

i was really so impressed with this J and how it faced up, i don't know what i thought but it certainly wasn't that it would look as white and clear as it does...so i have been very happy and plan for a J yet again when i go larger for my upgrade. i know that larger stones hold more color but if i don't think that the 'difference' will be SO large that i'd be appalled. if anything it will only appear a tiny bit warmer from the side and probably the same to me face up. i don't have the best vision though AND i don't look for flaws or things in my stones really, so maybe that's a key component. i think mind-white just like mind-clean is going to be a really individual thing. for me i count my blessings that i am not super particular about color or clarity, cut being my top priority so i'm able to get a larger stone which is really what i want, but without anyone really being the 'wiser' as to dropping down color and clarity.
 

solange

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Date: 12/12/2005 12:52:03 PM
Author: denverappraiser



You’re arguing that the color grading scale has too many steps and that what is being graded (the saturation of color as viewed from the pavilion under specialized lights) isn’t what customers find important. Both of these are valid points and I think they generally cause people to under-appreciate ‘low’ color stones. By the way, HRD and several of the other major European labs grade color face up for this very reason.





Which raindrop is the one that makes it a storm?





Neil Beaty
GG(GIA) ISA NAJA
Professional Appraisals in Denver
This is exactly the point I was making. I want to pay for what I can see and if some experts cannot tell color within a rather large price range, I want to pay for the color the ring appears--not what it is graded unmounted. I assume that the labs that grade color from the top also look at the sides that show. I know some people like to feel they have the highest quality stone and are willing to pay the price for it and I respect that.

But diamonds are not an investment. There are better ways to invest your money. They are an adornment and if I had had this information when I bought my stone, I would have been more concerned about the color at the top than at the bottom which no one sees.

In another post on this forum. RockDoc says he has seen stones lab graded J-L that when set appear as G and H.
 

blitz

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I find that the weight/(apparent size) of the diamond makes a difference in color face up appearance of a mounted diamond. Also as already mentioned, the enviroment in which it is being graded. I also always prefer to use my master diamonds when grading.

And, its possible that we all do not see the same subtle saturation of color.
 

JohnQuixote

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Date: 12/12/2005 12:52:03 PM
Author: denverappraiser

You’re arguing that the color grading scale has too many steps and that what is being graded (the saturation of color as viewed from the pavilion under specialized lights) isn’t what customers find important. Both of these are valid points and I think they generally cause people to under-appreciate ‘low’ color stones. By the way, HRD and several of the other major European labs grade color face up for this very reason.



Which raindrop is the one that makes it a storm?



Neil Beaty
GG(GIA) ISA NAJA
Professional Appraisals in Denver
Hey Neil, I was speaking with Paul a few moments ago and asked him about this (HRD). Neither of us is under the impression that they grade rounds in the face up position for color, but if you have different info please let us know.


This is an interesting thread Solange. I think it''s relevant to point out that if vendors were to charge for apparent face-up color (rather than lab-graded color) the premiums would really be associated with great cut instead of color. Similarly, if labs were to grade apparent color, rather than the actual body color of the diamond, it would technically be a part of cut-grading and not color grading in a puritanical sense. Does that make sense?

Another thought: Can you imagine the outcry raised by all of the "J stones in platinum" owners if vendors started adding such a premium to such diamonds?
 

belle

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Date: 12/12/2005 1:43:41 PM
Author: JohnQuixote

Another thought: Can you imagine the outcry raised by all of the ''J stones in platinum'' owners if vendors started adding such a premium to such diamonds?
hahahahahaha....that is EXACTLY what i was thinking!....inverse premiums
 

oldminer

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We grade the color of diamonds by "convention". That means we come together on how we do it and in what lighting it is done. This is an arbitrary decision based on the experience of diamond dealers as to what sort of lighting has worked best to discern small nuances of color difference. We could agree to grade differently, and it would have an important impact on the market and the values for each stone. It would be very complex in how things might change.

Color grading can be doine differently than the present convention, but it would make the regular structure now present in the market innappropriate to the task of assigning prices to stones.
 

denverappraiser

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Date: 12/12/2005 1:43:41 PM
Author: JohnQuixote

Hey Neil, I was speaking with Paul a few moments ago and asked him about this (HRD). Neither of us is under the impression that they grade rounds in the face up position for color, but if you have different info please let us know.


This is an interesting thread Solange. I think it''s relevant to point out that if vendors were to charge for apparent face-up color (rather than lab-graded color) the premiums would really be associated with great cut instead of color. Similarly, if labs were to grade apparent color, rather than the actual body color of the diamond, it would technically be a part of cut-grading and not color grading in a puritanical sense. Does that make sense?

Another thought: Can you imagine the outcry raised by all of the ''J stones in platinum'' owners if vendors started adding such a premium to such diamonds?
Paul is a much better source than I am for this information. HRD has a training program for gemologists in Belgium and I wouldn''t be surprised if he knows some of their graduates. Perhaps he could ask one of them. As I understand it, there is a standard grading proceedure set down by CIBJO that is subscribed to by a fair number of the worldwide labs, including HRD (and not including GIA). The approach to grading color is one of the major differences along with the SI3 clarity grade. I''m a GIA guy and I do it the GIA way. My statement is based on what I''ve heard from European friends. I believe we''ve got some European gemologists that participate here who can speak more directly about this.

Neil Beaty
GG(GIA) ISA NAJA
Professional Appraisals in Denver
 

skphotoimages

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Solange. I''m sure you''ve heard this before, but if you are setting it in White gold or platinium, "I"''s will face up fairly white. I can see a tinge of color in my "I" only at and angle in certain lights. If you want to avoid even this, go with an "H". In yellow gold you can easily do a "J" and it will look very white. Size of the stone matters too. My first ring was a J in yellow gold, and it looked as white as my second stone which I was told was a "G", but later told was more likely an "I". I saw no color in that one, but it was 0.47cts. In my 1.55ct "I", like I said I only see a tinge of color. but no one else seems to be able to. I am extremely color sensitive though.
 

solange

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This is an interesting thread Solange. I think it's relevant to point out that if vendors were to charge for apparent face-up color (rather than lab-graded color) the premiums would really be associated with great cut instead of color. Similarly, if labs were to grade apparent color, rather than the actual body color of the diamond, it would technically be a part of cut-grading and not color grading in a puritanical sense. Does that make sense?



Another thought: Can you imagine the outcry raised by all of the "J stones in platinum" owners if vendors started adding such a premium to such diamonds?
Quote from John Quixote

I do not know how to incorporate all this pricing and grading information. As you know, I bought a 4.10 SI2, I colored Ideal cut round stone from your company. It is set in platinum. I am very pleased with the stone and I know I got a great buy and wonderful service.

That being said, if I had known that some stones of the same color grade, graded by GIA, might look 2,3 or more grades lighter when set, that would have been one of the first questions after cut quality that I would have asked Brian when he described the stone--what color will it face up when mounted? Would this be an unreasonable question for an Internet vendor to answer when you cannot actually see the stone?

My stone is set very low in your excellent Tiffany style setting. You can barely see the sides of the stone because the prongs are spread and cover it. Is there any way that I can find out what color my stone actually appears face up. Since it is a large stone, I assume it would absorb more color than a smaller one.

 

JohnQuixote

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Date: 12/12/2005 4:58:25 PM
Author: solange

This is an interesting thread Solange. I think it''s relevant to point out that if vendors were to charge for apparent face-up color (rather than lab-graded color) the premiums would really be associated with great cut instead of color. Similarly, if labs were to grade apparent color, rather than the actual body color of the diamond, it would technically be a part of cut-grading and not color grading in a puritanical sense. Does that make sense?

Another thought: Can you imagine the outcry raised by all of the ''J stones in platinum'' owners if vendors started adding such a premium to such diamonds?

I do not know how to incorporate all this pricing and grading information. As you know, I bought a 4.10 SI2, I colored Ideal cut round stone from your company. It is set in platinum. I am very pleased with the stone and I know I got a great buy and wonderful service.

That being said, if I had known that some stones of the same color grade, graded by GIA might look 2,3 or more grades lighter when set, that would have been one of the first questions after cut quality that I would have asked Brian when he described the stone--what color will it face up when mounted? Would this be an unreasonable question to ask an Internet vendor when you cannot actually see the stone?

My stone is set very low in your excellent Tiffany style setting. You can barely see the sides of the stone because the prongs are spread and cover it. Is there any way that I can find out what color my stone actually appears face up. Since it is a large stone, I assume it would absorb more color than a smaller one.
Solange, thank you for the kind words.

It is not an unreasonable question at all. As a matter of fact, we discuss this with our clients: Diamonds that have great cut quality, especially near-colorless diamonds, may appear a color grade or two more colorless than the grade they received at a reputable lab such as the GIA or AGS. The extent to which this may occur varies. Each diamond must be evaluated separately. It can also be influenced by the presence of fluorescence.

I believe this was the case with your diamond. A moment ago I asked Brian about it (I was not working here when you acquired it). He remembers it well. Your choice of proportions and fluorescence caused it to face up more colorless than it normally would have. He believes it faced up a color grade or two better than the grade it received at the lab, and recalls that it was a wonderfully eye-clean SI. Did you have it appraised? If so the appraiser may have given you his assessment of the face-up appearance.
 

Gonzodogg

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Date: 12/12/2005 11:29:25 AM
Author:solange
In a recent post on appraisals it seems that according to some appraisers, a stone that is graded for color unmounted and from the bottom can vary in appearance to an expert by as much as 3 or more colors when mounted.

Since no one wears an unmounted stone, would you want to pay for,say a G color when you can possibly get a J color stone that, when mounted, faces up like a G. Apparently there is a difference between stones of the same color grade once they are mounted. This did not seem to take cut quality into consideration--only the difference in stones of the same color grade facing up differently when mounted.
This may explain why some people say their J stones face up white and others say they can see color after an F or G.
I think we are all missing a very important point - isn''t it true that a well cut diamond will face up much better that a poorly cut stone. Two "I"s of different cut quality will face up very differently.
As usual - cut the they key.
(Please correct me if I''m wrong)
 

solange

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If i understand correctly, it was never stated that cut quality came into the equation. It was just that some stones color graded from the back, face up whiter than others of the same color grade. I believe this has more to do with the particular character of the stone--not the way it was cut.

There has never been a debate about the fact that a well cut stone will have a much better appearance than a poorly cut stone of the same or better color. I think cut quality has been srongly emphasized here and few would disagree that a poorly cut stone will not be as attractive as a well cut stone.
 

solange

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Each diamond must be evaluated separately. It can also be influenced by the presence of fluorescence.





I believe this was the case with your diamond. A moment ago I asked Brian about it (I was not working here when you acquired it). He remembers it well. Your choice of proportions and fluorescence caused it to face up more colorless than it normally would have. He believes it faced up a color grade or two better than the grade it received at the lab, and recalls that it was a wonderfully eye-clean SI. Did you have it appraised? If so the appraiser may have given you his assessment of the face-up appearance.
John




www.whiteflash.com
mobile.whiteflash.com

John,
I did have it appraised. However I was not too happy with the appraisal and he did not give me that information or a value.

I do know that the stone is gorgeous and I got an outstanding value. The flourescence is only faint so I do not know whether that makes a difference but I have gotten many compliments on the stone and the setting.
 

Mara

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Date: 12/12/2005 5:41:42 PM
Author: Gonzodogg

Date: 12/12/2005 11:29:25 AM
Author:solange
In a recent post on appraisals it seems that according to some appraisers, a stone that is graded for color unmounted and from the bottom can vary in appearance to an expert by as much as 3 or more colors when mounted.

Since no one wears an unmounted stone, would you want to pay for,say a G color when you can possibly get a J color stone that, when mounted, faces up like a G. Apparently there is a difference between stones of the same color grade once they are mounted. This did not seem to take cut quality into consideration--only the difference in stones of the same color grade facing up differently when mounted.
This may explain why some people say their J stones face up white and others say they can see color after an F or G.
I think we are all missing a very important point - isn''t it true that a well cut diamond will face up much better that a poorly cut stone. Two ''I''s of different cut quality will face up very differently.
As usual - cut the they key.
(Please correct me if I''m wrong)
YES...cut is HUGE. A mediocre cut ''I'' stone (most likely with only mediocre symmetry) will not look the same as something like an H&A or superideal ''I'' stone. I have seen this one with my own two eyes. That is why I absolutely swear by cut ... to me the J looks like my G and H did ESP face down. I have had respected appraisers go ''wow that''s a J???'' after seeing it as well. So I know it''s not just me.
 

solange

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I learned most of what I know about the importance of cut from you, Mara. I have you to thank for having enough information to get this beautiful stone.

However, from what I seem to have gathered here, the color the stone faces upwhen set is not necessarily related to cut. It seems that some stones of the same color grade face up better than others when they are set. Therefore I think it is essential, particularly when you are buying on line, to ask the vendor what color the stone will face up when mounted.

It sounds to me as though your J stone is one of those stones that face up whiter than the grade would indicate.
 

Mara

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Date: 12/13/2005 12:21:41 AM
Author: solange
I learned most of what I know about the importance of cut from you, Mara. I have you to thank for having enough information to get this beautiful stone.

However, from what I seem to have gathered here, the color the stone faces upwhen set is not necessarily related to cut. It seems that some stones of the same color grade face up better than others when they are set. Therefore I think it is essential, particularly when you are buying on line, to ask the vendor what color the stone will face up when mounted.

It sounds to me as though your J stone is one of those stones that face up whiter than the grade would indicate.
Solange, it is true that there are different color grades within a color grade, aka a low K or a high K or a true K or similar....and also the lab who graded may have been strict or lenient on that day.

But the color the stone faces up when set IS related to cut in my opinion. A mediocre cut EGL graded J could face up whiter if it was a well-cut EGL graded J. It may still be a J but it may look a little whiter. And vice versa.

I was talking to Brian the other day re: a stone and asked re: color and he said it was a 'true' color..as opposed to low or high. So I do definitely ask about that, but eyes are sooooo personal. I don't think my eyes are that great honestly, so I may be lucky in that sense. Hopefully since I plan to stick with a J next time around.
 

solange

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I have seen several stones that were graded J-L color by a lab, but when set they appeared like they were G and H color.


The price differences can be very great - especially in large sizes with high clarity gradings


Quote by Rockdoc on another post.

Even if cut were a deciding factor, it seems that price difference would be considerable from a j-L color as opposed to a G and H. Also, since the GIA does not give cut quality yet, most people I would think go by color, and clarity and excellent symmetry and polish. Except for people enlightened by Pricescope, cut quality has not been given the emphasis it deserves.

A perfect example is a stone I nearly bought before i listed the dimensions on Pricescope--55 depth and 67 table. This vendor, a family well known in the Diamond Disrict for several decades, extolled the stone because it had a spread that was so much larger than its actual size and told me it was Ideal for that reason. had i not found Pricescope I would have bought it.

There is no doubt that cut quality makes an enormous difference in the appearance of a stone. But is this the only factor that comes into play when a set stone appears so much better grade than when it was unset. Or do certain diamonds which have been graded face down actually look several shades lighter because of the characteror nature of the stone when seen face up and in a mounting? In other words, is it only cut quality that explains this disparity? Or do certain stones have this characteristic of facing up better for reasons other than cut quality.

.
 

Regular Guy

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Date: 12/12/2005 1:55:18 PM
Author: oldminer
We grade the color of diamonds by ''convention''. That means we come together on how we do it and in what lighting it is done. This is an arbitrary decision based on the experience of diamond dealers as to what sort of lighting has worked best to discern small nuances of color difference. We could agree to grade differently, and it would have an important impact on the market and the values for each stone. It would be very complex in how things might change.

Color grading can be doine differently than the present convention, but it would make the regular structure now present in the market innappropriate to the task of assigning prices to stones.
Sonange''s itch seems like it may be an interesting one to scratch.

Regarding your concern, Dave, maybe we could keep some new proposed convention "just between us." If we looked at color like we do clarity and cut, based on what the user can "see," maybe we''re on to something.

Garry...your not carrying above H diamonds has been influential to me. to you or anyone...does this discussion make you think differently? How differently will a diamond show, set vs loose?
 

ssteigs

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It seems like there a differing opinions on the color topic even from the pros on this board. I posed the question about buying a 1.5ct. I color pirncess and have been told by a couple of pros (oldminer and rhino) that an I color will look fine as long as the cut is good. However others like Gary have stated that an I color is no good in this size/ shape. Once mounted the opinions probably differ even more.
My issue is the K color(graded wrong as an I) diamond I purchased looked pretty colorless to me when unmounted but definatley looked yellow(er) once mounted. This just gets tougher and tougher!!!
 

valeria101

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Date: 12/16/2005 12:13:52 PM
Author: Regular Guy


Garry...your not carrying above H diamonds has been influential to me. to you or anyone...does this discussion make you think differently? How differently will a diamond show, set vs loose?
Garry ''Cut-Nut'' ? I had no idea...

But there are plenty of such thresholds for inspiration: Tiffany stops at I-VS2, VCA at F-VVS2, Cartier at G-VS2 etc.

It is not true though that every upscale jewelry design label has such thresholds, especially when it comes to large diamonds, and stones are matched by color over a wide range of clarity judging stone by stone (e.g. D-VVS with E-SI2 for two large pears in the same pin).

same ol'' 2c worth
 

solange

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Solange's itch seems like it may be an interesting one to scratch.



Regarding your concern, Dave, maybe we could keep some new proposed convention "just between us." If we looked at color like we do clarity and cut, based on what the user can "see," maybe we're on to something.



Garry...your not carrying above H diamonds has been influential to me. to you or anyone...does this discussion make you think differently? How differently will a diamond show, set vs loose.

Quote from Ira Z.


Rock Doc has stated here that he has seen stones lab graded j-L that face up as G or H when mounted. In another thread, Newly Engaged states that her appraiser could not tell visually whether her stone was a D,E or F.

I do know that. as Mara has stated, it has to do with cut. Even if the cut is taken into consideration, there is a wide disparity in price between stones of 2 or more color grades, especially since the GIA does not yet grade for cut quality and most of the Certs seem to be GIA. So excelent polish and symmetry are often confused with excelent cut.

I still cannot get an answer to my question: Do certain stones which have been graded the standard way, face down, have properties other than cut that would make them face up 3 or more shades higher, particularly when mounted?

How does one select such a stone particularly if the appraiser sees the stone the "preferable" way--unmounted? Why would most people want to pay for, say, a G color when you can get a J-L that would look the same when mounted?

Since most of us are not buying investment quality diamonds, appearance when mounted is a major factor to me.

I bought an eye clean SI2 for that very reason--I was able to get a larger stone and not pay for something I cannot see. I feel the same about color. I prefer to pay for the color the stone looks face up, when I am wearing it, rather than how it looks from the bottom, that no one sees pmce it has been mounted.

If certain stones have particular properties,other than cut which is very important to me, and I had a choice of several stones of excellent cut, I would want to pick the one that appears to be the best color in my price range and size requirement. The actual grade from the bottom would mean very little to me if it did not show at the top once mounted.
 

Mara

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31,003
Solange it seems as though people have answered your question with what they see, you already have a bunch of opinions, but there is no DEFINTIVE right answer yes or no to your question. Grading is subjective.

Bottom line is that colors are graded that way for a reason. However, a D does not REALLY look like a G or else it would be graded a G. What our eyes see may be different but stones are given color grades for a reason.

You have so many variables here, that is why there could never be one right answer.

--Grading is done in labs by humans. Room for error right there. Grader has a bad day, in a bad mood, gives a stone a harsher grade, aka a J instead of an I.
--Colorimeters can also add to the confusion, maybe they give a grade to the stone that does not agree with the lab. Which is right?
--Appraisers may disagree with lab reports as well, naming that same J an I or maybe the opposite to a K.
--When you get the stone, your eye may not see it as an I or a J but rather an H. or maybe a K. Loose vs mounted may be different too.
--Color of metal can play into it.
--Cut and fluoresence add other variables into the mix on how the stone face sup.

Some people do see color in the pavilion of their stones, others do not. Fluor only helps from top down, not pavilion.

Would an AGS graded H&A AGS0 ideal very precisely cut J stone with med blue fluorescence face up whiter when mounted in platinum than an EGL graded maul-cut J stone with no fluorescence when mounted in platinum? YES. But within that answer there are still other variables...who is looking at the stone...which EGL lab graded etc.

I am confusing myself here now but this whole thread was fairly confusing to me to begin with. I think that the answer to any of these questions here just depends on the individual viewing the stone. Period.
 

solange

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Feb 20, 2004
Messages
871
You’re arguing that the color grading scale has too many steps and that what is being graded (the saturation of color as viewed from the pavilion under specialized lights) isn’t what customers find important. Both of these are valid points and I think they generally cause people to under-appreciate ‘low’ color stones. By the way, HRD and several of the other major European labs grade color face up for this very reason.



Which raindrop is the one that makes it a storm?



Neil Beaty
GG(GIA) ISA NAJA
Professional Appraisals in Denver




Not everyone seemed to think it was confusing. I am sorry if you did but obviously Ira Z thought it was a worthwhile topic as did Lorelei, Denver Appraiser and some others.

I look at threads and if I do not feel they are worthwhile, I do not bother to read through them or respond. Since this is an open forum I respect everyone's right to express their opinion. If the topic is off base or of no interest, people stop responding.
 
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