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UK and other non-US PSers. What e-rings and wedding bands do you see locally?

RockFox

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Aug 13, 2020
Messages
175
Can I ask, why is it inappropriate to talk about your jewelry in the UK and what is “ high street”.

It’s sort of a British value to be understated and one doesn’t really discuss money with people. I think talking about jewellery is fine, in the right crowds, but no one (unless they are very close to you) will generally ever ask how much you spent. The High Street is a common street name for the primary business street of a settlement - its one of those colloquialisms ;-) Here it is usually where you’d find the equivalent of mall jewellery. We have malls too of course :)
 

MillieLou

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Feb 27, 2020
Messages
438
I was typing a response but @RockFox has it spot on! High streets are the main shopping areas of each town. A high street jeweller is like a mall jeweller, usually a chain selling overpriced things by staff who don't really know about jewellery. As opposed to an independent jeweller who would create items in-house, or a luxury brand.

It's just a thing in the UK - it's considered intrusive to say anything that might be alluding to talking about money other than with people you know very well. A unique inexpensive piece like a silver tribal necklace or colourful beads would attract a lot of comments. A large diamond ring or expensive understated piece, not so much. It's a bit of a shame as I'd love to ask people about their jewellery but know most would find it awkward. It would be acceptable to say "oh what a pretty ring" and then see how the person responds! Talking about specs would never happen, so I'm always surprised when I read about people on here knowing the colour and clarity of their friends' diamonds.
 

AprilBaby

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jul 17, 2008
Messages
11,851
Thank you for your responses! I thought high street was like Rodeo Drive, super high end shopping.
My friends and I share our jewelry adventures and specs all the time. I will remember never to ask my UK friends to avoid embarrassing them or me.
 

Cerulean

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Sep 13, 2019
Messages
1,908
Reading this this thread was totally fun!

My European friends & family ( hailing from a mix of places in both Northern and Southern Europe) tend to have understated looks - plain bands, or modest (by US standards) diamonds (they happened to be inherited and are <.5 carats).

In the US, I regularly see 2+ carat diamonds. Mostly RBs, but next up I see haloed cushions, solitaire emerald cuts....ovals more recently with younger couples (I live in Chicago). I also see big blingy eternities, but commonly in 40+ age group. Mostly white metals, yellow gold is getting to be more popular. Loooots of pave all around!

Another trend I am seeing with young couples are non-traditional center stones, like black diamonds, green sapphires, aquamarine...more "funky"

The CEO of my current workplace, it's a small start up, has one of the biggest ECs I have ever seen in person. It's possibly 6 carats and appears nice (although I haven't been bold enough to thoroughly scrutinize) on a microthin (like 1.5mm) pave band and just swings about when she gestures with her hands. For a bling fan...talk about distracting :rolleyes:
 

AllAboardTheBlingTrain

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Apr 22, 2020
Messages
1,353
I can come in with the Indian perspective which is so different to the UK, if that would be entertaining :D

Obviously it’s income and social circle dependent so it might not apply across the country, but Indians in general value bling a LOT. Actually, engagement rings aren’t traditional for Hindus, so I would say mine is the first generation where it’s really ubiquitous and people sort of expect you to have one (though lots of people in my parents’ generation, including my mom, do). Wedding bands are unusual. Most people wear only one ring.

Big is good, bigger is better, and piling on the bling is normal. I actually feel more normal wearing my bling in India as opposed to where I live because though India is more unsafe, if you’re going everywhere by car and you’re going to more upscale places, you’ll blend right in with your bling. I’m not engaged yet, but the biggest ring amongst my peers is something like 4 or 5 carat off the top of my head; and amongst my mom’s peers I know someone who’s ring is easily 10+, closer to 12. Now obviously this isn’t like everyone on the street is wearing huge rocks, but wearing huge rocks is not “weird” if you can afford it. I myself am aiming for a 2.5-3ct when I get engaged.

Also, you would never ask anyone the colour or the clarity. At most you’ll just say “what a beautiful ring” and people will reply with thanks. Indians in general I would say don’t value colour and clarity that much. Size is definitely the most important thing. More knowledge in my generation, again, also in my mom’s generation a lot of diamonds were bought uncerted on trust. Nowadays people have become better about demanding a cert but some (lots, probably) still buy without a cert.

Edit to add: a lot of people do wear inherited stones, if they have them, though usually not in their old settings. Also upgrading happens but isn’t normal/normalised. People are more likely to buy a bigger “anniversary ring” at a later stage and perhaps keep the original ring as an RHR or give it to their kids as an e-ring.
 
Last edited:

MrsDiamondHeart

Rough_Rock
Joined
Jan 29, 2021
Messages
35
This thread is great, I’m loving all the cultural perspectives, including the US ones. @AllAboardTheBlingTrain your post was such fun to read.

@AprilBaby you can definitely compliment a UK friend on their ER, or diamond studs, it would be taken really well, I guess it’s just as others have said, we don’t talk about the 4c’s, or at least not in my experience. Possibly because a lot of people buy rings from mall or high street jewellery chains and so they don’t select the diamond, they just get what they’re given in the stock ring, and so don’t know, or that it might be regarded as embarrassing to say that the cut isn’t triple x or high clarity. If you take a look at some of the big UK brands like Goldsmith or Ernest Jones websites, there’s very little info provided on the diamond.

There’s a huge trend in the UK for buying high end costume jewellery, and some really well respected brands making vermeil pieces and people will definitely chat about that, and be open about how much it cost etc.

We’re such a strange breed here across the pond!
 

MillieLou

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Feb 27, 2020
Messages
438
Thank you for your responses! I thought high street was like Rodeo Drive, super high end shopping.
My friends and I share our jewelry adventures and specs all the time. I will remember never to ask my UK friends to avoid embarrassing them or me.

Oh no you don't have to avoid asking - it wouldn't embarrass or offend anyone! Especially as you're from the US, people would just assume it's an American Thing :lol: It's more of an observation that it doesn't tend to happen here. Probably mostly because the general public is less familiar with the finer details of diamonds.

Reading this this thread was totally fun!

My European friends & family ( hailing from a mix of places in both Northern and Southern Europe) tend to have understated looks - plain bands, or modest (by US standards) diamonds (they happened to be inherited and are <.5 carats).

In the US, I regularly see 2+ carat diamonds. Mostly RBs, but next up I see haloed cushions, solitaire emerald cuts....ovals more recently with younger couples (I live in Chicago). I also see big blingy eternities, but commonly in 40+ age group. Mostly white metals, yellow gold is getting to be more popular. Loooots of pave all around!

Another trend I am seeing with young couples are non-traditional center stones, like black diamonds, green sapphires, aquamarine...more "funky"

The CEO of my current workplace, it's a small start up, has one of the biggest ECs I have ever seen in person. It's possibly 6 carats and appears nice (although I haven't been bold enough to thoroughly scrutinize) on a microthin (like 1.5mm) pave band and just swings about when she gestures with her hands. For a bling fan...talk about distracting :rolleyes:

That sounds like an amazing ring. I actually don't think I've ever seen a stone larger than 2 carats in real life!!
 

MillieLou

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Feb 27, 2020
Messages
438
I can come in with the Indian perspective which is so different to the UK, if that would be entertaining :D

Obviously it’s income and social circle dependent so it might not apply across the country, but Indians in general value bling a LOT. Actually, engagement rings aren’t traditional for Hindus, so I would say mine is the first generation where it’s really ubiquitous and people sort of expect you to have one (though lots of people in my parents’ generation, including my mom, do). Wedding bands are unusual. Most people wear only one ring.

Big is good, bigger is better, and piling on the bling is normal. I actually feel more normal wearing my bling in India as opposed to where I live because though India is more unsafe, if you’re going everywhere by car and you’re going to more upscale places, you’ll blend right in with your bling. I’m not engaged yet, but the biggest ring amongst my peers is something like 4 or 5 carat off the top of my head; and amongst my mom’s peers I know someone who’s ring is easily 10+, closer to 12. Now obviously this isn’t like everyone on the street is wearing huge rocks, but wearing huge rocks is not “weird” if you can afford it. I myself am aiming for a 2.5-3ct when I get engaged.

Also, you would never ask anyone the colour or the clarity. At most you’ll just say “what a beautiful ring” and people will reply with thanks. Indians in general I would say don’t value colour and clarity that much. Size is definitely the most important thing. More knowledge in my generation, again, also in my mom’s generation a lot of diamonds were bought uncerted on trust. Nowadays people have become better about demanding a cert but some (lots, probably) still buy without a cert.

Edit to add: a lot of people do wear inherited stones, if they have them, though usually not in their old settings. Also upgrading happens but isn’t normal/normalised. People are more likely to buy a bigger “anniversary ring” at a later stage and perhaps keep the original ring as an RHR or give it to their kids as an e-ring.

@AllAboardTheBlingTrain this is so fascinating. My family on one side is Indian, but has not lived there for many years, so we are out of touch with modern-day jewellery over there. There is a lot of inherited 22K gold old-fashioned (though beautiful) intricate pieces in a bank vault that will be mine one day. But none that fit in with my casual UK lifestyle, which is a shame!

What do people tend to wear in India these days? Is it still YG or more white or rose gold / platinum / diamonds / gemstones? I would love to see or hear about what you might wear on a typical day.

I'm amazed at people having such big diamonds. I guess they must be a comparable price to the rest of the world - do people just have a lot of disposable income, or is it a way of demonstrating status/wealth so they prioritise it? Or are you in celebrity circles?!
 

MillieLou

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Feb 27, 2020
Messages
438
This thread is great, I’m loving all the cultural perspectives, including the US ones. @AllAboardTheBlingTrain your post was such fun to read.

@AprilBaby you can definitely compliment a UK friend on their ER, or diamond studs, it would be taken really well, I guess it’s just as others have said, we don’t talk about the 4c’s, or at least not in my experience. Possibly because a lot of people buy rings from mall or high street jewellery chains and so they don’t select the diamond, they just get what they’re given in the stock ring, and so don’t know, or that it might be regarded as embarrassing to say that the cut isn’t triple x or high clarity. If you take a look at some of the big UK brands like Goldsmith or Ernest Jones websites, there’s very little info provided on the diamond.

There’s a huge trend in the UK for buying high end costume jewellery, and some really well respected brands making vermeil pieces and people will definitely chat about that, and be open about how much it cost etc.

We’re such a strange breed here across the pond!

Yes, we are really strange! :devil:

I read a great book called "Watching the English" a few years ago. It basically explained all of the weird things we do without even realising it. For example, we tend towards indirect questions. Rather than asking someone directly "where do you live?", an English person would be more likely to say something like "do you live nearby?". Or if someone from my work met DH, they wouldn't ask "what do you do?" but may say something like "are you in medicine too?" knowing full well that he's not, but as a more indirect question that invites him to talk about what he does without being put on the spot.

Similarly, I might say to someone I had met a few times "what a pretty ring", and they could then either simply say "thank you" and leave it there, or start expounding on its specs if they are a PSer :lol:

I lived in the US for a few months and it was refreshing to just be asked straightforward questions like "are you married?" rather than beating around the bush!
 

AllAboardTheBlingTrain

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Apr 22, 2020
Messages
1,353
@AllAboardTheBlingTrain this is so fascinating. My family on one side is Indian, but has not lived there for many years, so we are out of touch with modern-day jewellery over there. There is a lot of inherited 22K gold old-fashioned (though beautiful) intricate pieces in a bank vault that will be mine one day. But none that fit in with my casual UK lifestyle, which is a shame!

What do people tend to wear in India these days? Is it still YG or more white or rose gold / platinum / diamonds / gemstones? I would love to see or hear about what you might wear on a typical day.

I'm amazed at people having such big diamonds. I guess they must be a comparable price to the rest of the world - do people just have a lot of disposable income, or is it a way of demonstrating status/wealth so they prioritise it? Or are you in celebrity circles?!

So traditional jewelry like what you’d wear for festivals etc is still very much 22kt and polki with enamel etc. Very similar to what you probably have (if your Indian family is from the north of India! South I know they tend to do more carved gold like temple jewelry).

I would say people rarely - very very very rarely - wear platinum. I doubt anyone does. White gold is quite popular in my generation for an ering, though people do wear YG (YG on balance is probably the most popular for jewelry in general but for an ering its a toss up between YG and WG). RG is pretty rare. I mean I do see people wearing RG jewelry sometimes but it’s not super popular. RG also doesn’t go with a lot of Indian skin tones I find. Like I can wear it, but it depends on the alloy. Some brands, like Cartier, their RG looks awful on me.

I would say 18kt gold though is the most popular for erings. Nothing below 14kt I’m quite sure. Jewelers wouldn’t consider <14kt really gold.

To clarify when I say “peers” I mean social friends or acquaintances, not like my best friends lol. I’m not a celebrity haha, not at all, but there is a LOT of money in India but it’s also concentrated in (relatively) few hands. I think because wealth disparities are so large. In terms of diamond prices I would say that you can usually get “US online vendor” prices with in-person service. Labour costs are low, so there’s barely any cost in the setting.

That being said, bling is important and most definitely a social status thing. It’s not just rings. There’s also no such thing as “understated”. If you wear a necklace especially to a wedding, you want to cover as much neck and chest as possible. There’s real estate to cover haha.
 

AprilBaby

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jul 17, 2008
Messages
11,851
This thread is great, I’m loving all the cultural perspectives, including the US ones. @AllAboardTheBlingTrain your post was such fun to read.

@AprilBaby you can definitely compliment a UK friend on their ER, or diamond studs, it would be taken really well, I guess it’s just as others have said, we don’t talk about the 4c’s, or at least not in my experience. Possibly because a lot of people buy rings from mall or high street jewellery chains and so they don’t select the diamond, they just get what they’re given in the stock ring, and so don’t know, or that it might be regarded as embarrassing to say that the cut isn’t triple x or high clarity. If you take a look at some of the big UK brands like Goldsmith or Ernest Jones websites, there’s very little info provided on the diamond.

There’s a huge trend in the UK for buying high end costume jewellery, and some really well respected brands making vermeil pieces and people will definitely chat about that, and be open about how much it cost etc.

We’re such a strange breed here across the pond!

You were here before us so maybe we are the strange breed!
 

RosieR

Brilliant_Rock
Premium
Joined
Feb 3, 2013
Messages
771
When looking to set my loose OEC, I reached out to ‘savvy and sand’ who are the only sellers of Erika Winters in the UK. The owners of the shop were coming up north to exhibit what they had on offer for their northern clientele. When I attend my appointment, I was in a separate room and was told that I was the only client who requested this designer. All his other appointments were for clients looking for verragio engagement rings. I was quite surprised, as in my opinion the settings are quite ornate, but apparently they are very popular in the northwest of England.
 

Venti25

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Apr 12, 2012
Messages
190
Oh no offence taken lol I totally understand. If it wasn't for PS, I wouldn't know to buy from the States and even with taxes we're still saving a heap.

Yes I agree that Australia gets influenced a lot by what we see on TV and social media lol and that's mainly from the USA.

I'm in Melbourne, but originally from Brisbane and my circle is late 20s to 40s. A recent work colleague got engaged. He bought his fiance a plain solitaire but apparently custom made (I think we have differing definitions of custom made) round brilliant cut of about 1ct for about 20k AUD and that was a bargain lol.

yeah there's a big mark up in some places.:eek2:o_O
 
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