shape
carat
color
clarity

This may explain why diamond inventory is low and price is high

flyingpig

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Nov 7, 2015
Messages
2,885

No wonder why I was not able to find anything decent at reasonable price.

Time for beach side or mountain top proposal. Competition for well cut diamonds is all time high
 
Last edited:

maryjane04

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Nov 21, 2013
Messages
1,147
I guess with the lack of travel people have more money to spend on diamonds :D

I had a close friend invite 320 people to her wedding recently - then due to covid lockdowns, she could only have 100. I think weddings are starting to downsize so saving more $$ so why not invest in a bigger engagement ring :kiss2:
 

heididdl

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Oct 25, 2012
Messages
2,665
When I was on my search for studs 1.50 each stone. I was told by several dealers and Brick and mortar jewelers that since 1.50 was one of the most popular size stones that they were not as plentiful because of the size popularity and I needed 2 lol.
it took 2 months to find anything that was decent and in my price range . FYI
 

Wink

Rough_Rock
Trade
Joined
May 24, 2021
Messages
85
These have been some trying times in many businesses. I will keep my comments to the diamond industry, although many segments of the jewelry world have been similarly affected.

Covid-19 has disrupted lives around the world, much worse in many countries than it has been here in the States, and we suffered greatly here too. The mines around the world were closed for months, some of them will never reopen. This hurts the world-wide supply at a time when the supply of natural diamonds is already dwindling as older mines play out and new ones are not being found.

Cutting houses around the world were also shut down, further reducing the availability of new production to diamond vendors around the world. Crafted by Infinity’s team was able to work for a while, not able to work, able to work, not able to work, etc., etc., etc.

In India cutters were told to go home and many had to walk for hundreds of miles as they could not take public transportation at the time they were released. Some died on the journey and not just from Covid-19. It may take years to bring the houses back online and fully staffed.

With clients not coming into bricks and mortar stores, many of them went out of business during the past year. Online stores enjoyed strong demand as money was not being spent on travel and vacations. The problem for these stores was procurement of inventory, especially for those dealing in better cuts. There is still a huge overhang of stones cut for weight retention rather than beauty.

There is the apocryphal story of the Chinese blessing, which is also claimed to be a curse, “May you live in interesting times.” My Chinese friends tell me there is no such Chinese curse, however I am of the opinion that we do live in VERY INTERESTING times, and I for one am so glad that I do. I see this as a great time to learn about markets as natural diamond prices continue to rise, especially in the larger sizes, while lab grown prices continue to fall as technology improves and brings down the cost of production.

It may well be that in a year or two, we will all look back wistfully at today’s pricing and wish we had been prescient enough to have bought a few buckets full of them. I have been in the market since a one carat D-Flawless went for $2,500 per carat at wholesale. I once bought a light pink 0.99 ct pear shape cut by C.A. Kiger that was stunning and sold it three days before Beniffer happened and the price I sold it for was about a quarter of what I could have bought it for a mere few weeks later and even then it was a bargain compared to what I would have to pay for it today.

Pricing today may reflect the supply-demand dynamic created by Covid-19, but I believe it also reflects the enduring value of diamonds. Interestingly, as the lab grown diamond niche grows, it seems to make natural diamonds more distinctive and valuable by comparison. Today’s market may seem high today but in the future we may see current pricing as a great buying opportunity.
 

Rfisher

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Oct 19, 2013
Messages
3,685
Pricing today may reflect the supply-demand dynamic created by Covid-19, but I believe it also reflects the enduring value of diamonds. Interestingly, as the lab grown diamond niche grows, it seems to make natural diamonds more distinctive and valuable by comparison. Today’s market may seem high today but in the future we may see current pricing as a great buying opportunity.
I should speed up my timeline for a 2ct branded MRB
o_O
 

heididdl

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Oct 25, 2012
Messages
2,665
These have been some trying times in many businesses. I will keep my comments to the diamond industry, although many segments of the jewelry world have been similarly affected.

Covid-19 has disrupted lives around the world, much worse in many countries than it has been here in the States, and we suffered greatly here too. The mines around the world were closed for months, some of them will never reopen. This hurts the world-wide supply at a time when the supply of natural diamonds is already dwindling as older mines play out and new ones are not being found.

Cutting houses around the world were also shut down, further reducing the availability of new production to diamond vendors around the world. Crafted by Infinity’s team was able to work for a while, not able to work, able to work, not able to work, etc., etc., etc.

In India cutters were told to go home and many had to walk for hundreds of miles as they could not take public transportation at the time they were released. Some died on the journey and not just from Covid-19. It may take years to bring the houses back online and fully staffed.

With clients not coming into bricks and mortar stores, many of them went out of business during the past year. Online stores enjoyed strong demand as money was not being spent on travel and vacations. The problem for these stores was procurement of inventory, especially for those dealing in better cuts. There is still a huge overhang of stones cut for weight retention rather than beauty.

There is the apocryphal story of the Chinese blessing, which is also claimed to be a curse, “May you live in interesting times.” My Chinese friends tell me there is no such Chinese curse, however I am of the opinion that we do live in VERY INTERESTING times, and I for one am so glad that I do. I see this as a great time to learn about markets as natural diamond prices continue to rise, especially in the larger sizes, while lab grown prices continue to fall as technology improves and brings down the cost of production.

It may well be that in a year or two, we will all look back wistfully at today’s pricing and wish we had been prescient enough to have bought a few buckets full of them. I have been in the market since a one carat D-Flawless went for $2,500 per carat at wholesale. I once bought a light pink 0.99 ct pear shape cut by C.A. Kiger that was stunning and sold it three days before Beniffer happened and the price I sold it for was about a quarter of what I could have bought it for a mere few weeks later and even then it was a bargain compared to what I would have to pay for it today.

Pricing today may reflect the supply-demand dynamic created by Covid-19, but I believe it also reflects the enduring value of diamonds. Interestingly, as the lab grown diamond niche grows, it seems to make natural diamonds more distinctive and valuable by comparison. Today’s market may seem high today but in the future we may see current pricing as a great buying opportunity.

Boy am I blessed that I found my 2 1.50 stones for my studs .
 

Sparklemore

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Dec 24, 2015
Messages
102
These have been some trying times in many businesses. I will keep my comments to the diamond industry, although many segments of the jewelry world have been similarly affected.

Covid-19 has disrupted lives around the world, much worse in many countries than it has been here in the States, and we suffered greatly here too. The mines around the world were closed for months, some of them will never reopen. This hurts the world-wide supply at a time when the supply of natural diamonds is already dwindling as older mines play out and new ones are not being found.

Cutting houses around the world were also shut down, further reducing the availability of new production to diamond vendors around the world. Crafted by Infinity’s team was able to work for a while, not able to work, able to work, not able to work, etc., etc., etc.

In India cutters were told to go home and many had to walk for hundreds of miles as they could not take public transportation at the time they were released. Some died on the journey and not just from Covid-19. It may take years to bring the houses back online and fully staffed.

With clients not coming into bricks and mortar stores, many of them went out of business during the past year. Online stores enjoyed strong demand as money was not being spent on travel and vacations. The problem for these stores was procurement of inventory, especially for those dealing in better cuts. There is still a huge overhang of stones cut for weight retention rather than beauty.

There is the apocryphal story of the Chinese blessing, which is also claimed to be a curse, “May you live in interesting times.” My Chinese friends tell me there is no such Chinese curse, however I am of the opinion that we do live in VERY INTERESTING times, and I for one am so glad that I do. I see this as a great time to learn about markets as natural diamond prices continue to rise, especially in the larger sizes, while lab grown prices continue to fall as technology improves and brings down the cost of production.

It may well be that in a year or two, we will all look back wistfully at today’s pricing and wish we had been prescient enough to have bought a few buckets full of them. I have been in the market since a one carat D-Flawless went for $2,500 per carat at wholesale. I once bought a light pink 0.99 ct pear shape cut by C.A. Kiger that was stunning and sold it three days before Beniffer happened and the price I sold it for was about a quarter of what I could have bought it for a mere few weeks later and even then it was a bargain compared to what I would have to pay for it today.

Pricing today may reflect the supply-demand dynamic created by Covid-19, but I believe it also reflects the enduring value of diamonds. Interestingly, as the lab grown diamond niche grows, it seems to make natural diamonds more distinctive and valuable by comparison. Today’s market may seem high today but in the future we may see current pricing as a great buying opportunity.

Very interesting!
 

denverappraiser

Ideal_Rock
Trade
Joined
Jul 21, 2004
Messages
8,950
I never thought I would be so personally aware of what a Non-essential worker was. I'm definitely seeing an uptick in engagement rings. Get it appraised, get it insured, BEFORE you make the presentation.
 

Garry H (Cut Nut)

Super_Ideal_Rock
Trade
Joined
Aug 15, 2000
Messages
16,518
Covid has been a test of relationships.
Bad ones fail fast.
Good ones get confirmed.
hopefully we see a fall in the divorce rates of those getting hitched.
And a rise in the unhappy older relationships so we jewelers get more sales hahahaha
 
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