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The numbers game - how important?

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Second City

Rough_Rock
Joined
Dec 5, 2006
Messages
31
I recently purchased a diamond with the following specs and presented it to my fiancee on December 22.

Round Brilliant
GIA Report
Measurements: 6.90 - 6.96 x 4.31 mm
Carat Weight: 1.26
Color Grade: E
Clarity Grade: VS2
Cut Grade: Excellent

Depth: 62.2 %
Table: 55 %
Girdle: Thin to Medium, Faceted
Culet: None
Crown Angle: 35°
Crown Height: 16 %
Pavilion Angle: 41°
Pavilion Depth: 43 %
Star length: 50 %
Lower Half: 75 %

Polish: Excellent
Symmetry: Excellent
Fluorescence: None

Although some of the specs such as depth and crown/pavillion angle combo would likely fall outside the personal preferences of some on this board, I have found the diamond to be a peak performer. During the process, I visited one jeweler, M Martin & Company, who gave me terrific advice on the diamond selection process: numbers are not the be-all, end-all. To demonstrate this theory, the owner, Steve Martin, showed me a variety of diamonds, all with varying specs. The diamond which clearly outperformed the rest received an HCA score of 4.3 (maybe even higher, I can't recall).

After that demonstration, I based the entire selection process from that point foward not on numbers, but my eyes. I am extremely happy with the diamond I selected and love the way in performs in different lighting environments. It's scintillation is unbelievable.

This leads to the question, can the numbers in some instances be deceiving? Based on my experience, I have my own personal opinion, but I am curious as to what some of you think. I didn't use an ideal-scope in selecting my diamond, but am planning on purchasing one to assist my friends and co-workers. It's funny - I thought my obsession would cease after purchasing the diamond, but it has only intensified. I constantly want to learn more.

Happy New Year's!
 

strmrdr

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Nov 1, 2003
Messages
23,295
lighting +
lighting +
lighting +
environment +
cut/numbers +
preference ==
.............................
diamond appeal.

saying a diamond that scored 4.3 looked better without the other info is meaningless.
 

kenny

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 30, 2005
Messages
26,924
Many buyers on the Internet are going to use numbers and tools.


Sorry.
 

Second City

Rough_Rock
Joined
Dec 5, 2006
Messages
31
Date: 1/1/2007 6:53:48 PM
Author: kenny
Many buyers on the Internet are going to use numbers and tools.


Sorry.
I hope you didn''t misinterpret what I was saying. I am by no means discounting the use of numbers and tools. I think they are extremely helpful in the selection process; so much so that someone that purchase a diamond without physically seeing it and be extremely satisfied when received.
 

Second City

Rough_Rock
Joined
Dec 5, 2006
Messages
31
Date: 1/1/2007 6:46:29 PM
Author: Garry H (Cut Nut)
The stone you bought is about HCA 2 - not 4 something?

Did you see these stones loose with their pavilions open to light?
On what background and lighting etc?
The stone I purchased was approximately an HCA 2 and not from the store that I referenced in the topic. The stones I viewed in M Martin were loose - pavillions open to light, against a gray background, and in lighting that mimicked daylight.
 

kenny

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 30, 2005
Messages
26,924
Sure it is best to see the stone.
We keep hearing here, "Don't buy the paper, buy the stone."

That's great if you can.
But, Hello! We are on the Internet!

I believe that as more people get more comfortable with e-commerce more and more stones are going to be sold sight-unseen, so the paper, tools, and specs are very important to these buyers.
 

Garry H (Cut Nut)

Super_Ideal_Rock
Trade
Joined
Aug 15, 2000
Messages
14,581
Date: 1/1/2007 7:08:12 PM
Author: Second City

Date: 1/1/2007 6:46:29 PM
Author: Garry H (Cut Nut)
The stone you bought is about HCA 2 - not 4 something?

Did you see these stones loose with their pavilions open to light?
On what background and lighting etc?
The stone I purchased was approximately an HCA 2 and not from the store that I referenced in the topic. The stones I viewed in M Martin were loose - pavillions open to light, against a gray background, and in lighting that mimicked daylight.
Most diamonds around +4 have a lot of leakage and look great when back lit from the side. But you loose that once they are set. it is one reason why so many dealers prefer slightly deeper stones.

Common sense is not common.

The only light that mimics dayliht is daylight - and even different daylight is different. Fluoro light - especially desk mounted is quite useless for looking at diamonds.
 

WindyCitySparkle

Rough_Rock
Joined
Nov 24, 2006
Messages
73
Second City, I too was impressed with M Martin and my husband and I ended up buying my engagement diamond from them. I almost didn''t go in because I was tired of visiting all of the dealers on Wabash, but am so glad I did!
 

Second City

Rough_Rock
Joined
Dec 5, 2006
Messages
31
Date: 1/1/2007 7:14:32 PM
Author: Garry H (Cut Nut)
Date: 1/1/2007 7:08:12 PM

Author: Second City


Date: 1/1/2007 6:46:29 PM

Author: Garry H (Cut Nut)

The stone you bought is about HCA 2 - not 4 something?


Did you see these stones loose with their pavilions open to light?

On what background and lighting etc?
The stone I purchased was approximately an HCA 2 and not from the store that I referenced in the topic. The stones I viewed in M Martin were loose - pavillions open to light, against a gray background, and in lighting that mimicked daylight.
Most diamonds around +4 have a lot of leakage and look great when back lit from the side. But you loose that once they are set. it is one reason why so many dealers prefer slightly deeper stones.


Common sense is not common.


The only light that mimics dayliht is daylight - and even different daylight is different. Fluoro light - especially desk mounted is quite useless for looking at diamonds.
On second thought, the lighting was fluorescent. The stones were also viewed in different ring settings against a gray background. The GIA Report numbers for the two stones that performed well are 14883382 and 15180277. Their respective scores were 5.5 and 4.1. M Martin actually classified them under their "Best in Class" category, which they explain further on their site.
 
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