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Risks involved in setting a sapphire into a gold setting

Henrikas_B

Rough_Rock
Joined
May 13, 2015
Messages
19
Hello,

I have a relatively expensive sapphire and a 14 k. gold ring with a six prong mount. I am seeing a setter next week, and wonder what are the risks involved in setting the sapphire into the ring. The setter agrees to take full formal responsibility for the stone, but for a different price than if he doesn't take full formal responsibility (the difference is considerable). Would you recommend to go for the safer option or is it very unlikely that something happens to the stone?

Thanks
 

Lady_Disdain

Ideal_Rock
Trade
Joined
Jul 25, 2008
Messages
3,988
How clean is the sapphire - does it have any chips, fractures or feathers?
 

Henrikas_B

Rough_Rock
Joined
May 13, 2015
Messages
19
I am not an expert and I don't have a microscope, but with naked eye I can't seem to find any.
 

chrono

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 22, 2004
Messages
38,364
1. Is the bench experienced with setting coloured stones?
2. Do you have a loupe to check for where the inclusions are?
3. Do you have your own insurance?
4. Is the stone precision cut, non-precision cut or "wonky" in any way (off centered culet, thick girdle, etc)?

Generally, setting sapphires is easy and it is rare to have a mishap. However, you might prefer to have that piece of mind with the added insurance.
 

Henrikas_B

Rough_Rock
Joined
May 13, 2015
Messages
19
1. He advertises himself as diamond setter, though I see on his web many pieces with colored stones (can I actually post a link here to his website?)
2. I don't have a loupe (with naked eye, i cannot see anything)
3. Would companies insure a gemstone prior to setting it?
4. Not a precision cut. Somewhat off centered culet. I don't know what is considered "thick" or "thin" but it does not seem to be very thin.
 

chrono

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 22, 2004
Messages
38,364
Sure. A link to his website would be great. I would like to see the quality and workmanship. If you intend to buy some stones in the future, a loupe is very inexpensive and fun to use. Some insurance companies will insure a loose stone prior to setting but I chose to forgo this because:
1. Most of the stones I set are generally irreplaceable
2. The risk of damage, whilst possible, is low. I do have 2 spinels damaged but a lapidary fixed it.
3. I use only 2 or 3 very specific vendors because they have proven that they have "soft" hands.

Are you able to post a picture of the sapphire in question? A side view is best.
 

LD

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Messages
10,258
Are you willing to take the risk? Even the most experienced of setters can have a mishap even with a stone with no issues.

If you're worried and would be left seriously out of pocket, opt for the more expensive route.

I once had a very very experienced setter, chip a diamond quite badly. It happens.
 

Sunstorm

Brilliant_Rock
Trade
Joined
Feb 5, 2014
Messages
1,789
Setting sapphires is easy and considered one of the lowest risk stones as they are very tough. Even if there is a large inclusion, generally an experienced setter would not need to ask for a premium to avoid damaging the stone.
 
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