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Please run these specs on the DiamCalc.....

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kayla17

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jan 14, 2003
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2,083
Can anyone run these specs on the diamcalc for me. I tried to download the free version, but it won''t allow me to put in specs for a round brilliant-
table- 55.6
depth- 60.7
crown angle-34.7
pavillion angle- 40.6
crown %- 15.1
pavillion %- 42.8
girdle- 0.9 to 1.5%
culet- closed
Thanks in advance!!!!
 

Richard Sherwood

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Sep 25, 2002
Messages
4,924
A real traffic stopper...

Light Return Mono…….....Very Good 0.98
Light Return Stereo……….Very Good 0.97
(Non) Leakage Mono……...Very Good 1.00
(Non) Leakage Stereo…….Very Good 1.02
Contrast………….......…....Very Good 0.98
(Non) Fisheye Effect……..Very Good 1.00

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IdealScope- In general, the darker pink areas indicate areas of greater light return, with the lighter pink areas indicating areas of lesser light return. The black areas indicate areas of greater contrast, with the gray areas indicating areas of lesser contrast. The white areas indicate areas of light leakage. A good explanation of the IdealScope image along with examples can be found at https://www.pricescope.com/idealscope_indx.asp

Disclaimer- The facet arrangement and symmetry of the image will probably vary from your actual diamond, which may affect the light performance indicated. The image shown has perfect symmetry, which is rare, and the star facet/lower girdle facet lengths may vary from your diamond. The computer simulation is reproduced best when the actual diamond is being viewed and the image "tweaked" to the appearance of the diamond, or when the Sarin data is downloaded directly into the program. However, this "blind" reproduction should be helpful in indicating the major light performance aspects.
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Kayla17.jpg
 

niceice

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jan 29, 2003
Messages
1,792
We don't have the Diamond Calc program loaded on our laptop at home (and we're kicking back in front of the t.v. watching a movie) but we can tell you that the proportions of that puppy are "tight" and it shoud be a real barnstormer!
 

kayla17

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jan 14, 2003
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2,083
Richard,
Thank you so much for running those specs.
I actually have another question that has been bothering, about strain.
I had this diamond sent to AGA and they said it was a beautiful stone, it scored in the 1A cut class across the boards, and it scored a 0.7 on the HCA.
The thing is, I never asked them to check for strain for me and now these posts are coming up about strain and I am wondering if I should have the stone checked for strain or just forget about it.
I do plan on having the diamond insured, and I am sure that the likelihood of my diamond ever cracking is next to none.
Just to let you know, it is an F VVS2 with only one pinpoint plotted on the AGS cert., if that makes any difference.
Please let me know what you think.
Thanks in advance for any advice you can give.
 

Richard Sherwood

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Sep 25, 2002
Messages
4,924
Kayla, I consider the chances of a finished diamond cracking because of strain to be practically nil for all intents and purposes.

Consider this. Before that diamond reaches you, it has been either mined from a former volcanic kimberlite "pipe" deep in the ground, or panned from a river bed in which it has been tossed, ground, and knocked around against other rocks for centuries upon centuries.

They are dredged, drilled and blasted before being tossed on conveyor belts or blown out of the air by microbursts of air jet pressure. Then they are transported in bags with hundreds of other diamonds to the initial sorters, who dump them out and rummage through them. Then down the road they are transported in bags and papers to secondary and sometimes tertiary sorters who put them through the same process.

After that, they make it to the cutters, who cleave them, saw them, grind them and polish them. The wheels they use are spinning with diamond grit, and the grinding they go through is brutal.

After that, they end up with a diamond setter, the best of whom actually "snap" the diamond into prongs they've notched to receive the girdle.

The way I see it is this. If those diamonds could make it through all that, the chances that they are going to "explode" or crack upon everyday wear is probably a million to one, easy. If they gave odds in Las Vegas, I'd bet on the diamond all day long.
 

kayla17

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jan 14, 2003
Messages
2,083
I love you Richard!!! Even with that hump, and that strange dragging left leg, and all that drooling, actually, the more drool the better I say!!!
One day I will take YOU to lunch- Wendy's!!!
But seriously, thanks for putting my paranoid mind at ease!
 
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