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Platinum setting, (Rhino and others)

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Rook

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
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294
Ok, I know that the discussion about platinum has been beaten to death, but I have search the archives and I still have a question.

I know that my g/f wants platinum so there is really no discussion of whether white gold is better. What I need to know now is how to the the best platinum setting I can. I am concerned only with quality. I would like to get a very hard, strong, durable ring that will last a life-time.

I realize that platinum takes on scratches more, but that "patina" and antique look is what I think she likes. I have heard stories of people who had platinum rings wear down fast or have deep scratches. I want to avoid that at all costs.

My questions are:

1) What combination of metals should I ask for? 95% plat, 5% iridium? or something else?

2) I have heard that when a ring is "stamped" with either "platinum" "plat" "950" or so forth, that it does not necessarily mean that the ring is made of 95% platinum. Is this true? How do I ensure that I get what I ask for?

3) Would it be better for it to be forged, cast or a manufactured piece like a Stuller.

4) One jeweler said they generally get rough settings from a manufacturer and then "finish" the ring. Is that generally a good process?

5) Do you have any other tips and suggestions for making sure I get the high quality platinum ring I desire?

I appreciate any comments.

PS-ring-comp-3a-s-t-b.jpg
 

enibas

Rough_Rock
Joined
Nov 18, 2002
Messages
58
wow! fantastic questions...i'd be *very interested in the answers as well...
 

Rook

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
294
Thanks,

I hope some jewelers, especially those who work with platinum will have some answers.
 

Rhino

Ideal_Rock
Trade
Joined
Mar 28, 2001
Messages
6,273
Greetings Senor,

Scroll on down.

----------------
On 1/17/2003 11:23:43 PM Rook wrote:

Ok, I know that the discussion about platinum has been beaten to death, but I have search the archives and I still have a question.

I know that my g/f wants platinum so there is really no discussion of whether white gold is better. What I need to know now is how to the the best platinum setting I can. I am concerned only with quality. I would like to get a very hard, strong, durable ring that will last a life-time.

I realize that platinum takes on scratches more, but that "patina" and antique look is what I think she likes. I have heard stories of people who had platinum rings wear down fast or have deep scratches. I want to avoid that at all costs.

My questions are:

1) What combination of metals should I ask for? 95% plat, 5% iridium? or something else?
The 95/5 combo is fine and typically uses the alloy of ruthenium or cobalt. Some people are allergic to either/both of these and can sometimes result in irritation of some sort although this is rare.

The 90/10 combo is actually preferred by most manufactures and the most common alloy used is iridium (which itself is a platinum based metal). We have access to both but generally use this combo.

2) I have heard that when a ring is "stamped" with either "platinum" "plat" "950" or so forth, that it does not necessarily mean that the ring is made of 95% platinum. Is this true? How do I ensure that I get what I ask for?


The only true way is to bring it to an appraiser who has the metal testing devices that can differentiate between 900 & 950 platinum. I believe there may be one device that can make the seperation and that is the instrument made by Tri-Electronics the GTXL-24.

3) Would it be better for it to be forged, cast or a manufactured piece like a Stuller.
We usually deal in die-struck (Stuller). I believe there are more problems (ie. pitting) with the cast rings. Asking a platinum smith would be the best bet here as I do not work directly on the metal itself.

4) One jeweler said they generally get rough settings from a manufacturer and then "finish" the ring. Is that generally a good process?
That sounds like the "cast" process and is generally ok.

5) Do you have any other tips and suggestions for making sure I get the high quality platinum ring I desire?

I appreciate any comments.
Best bet is to get it properly appraised. That's the only way you can know for sure. Very recently the undercover news team hit our town of Massapequa (they do this from time to time) and purchased gold items from all the jewelery stores in our area. There is the mall that is close to us and there is an indoor flea market as well (our roots). Well ... EVERY STORE in the indoor flea market got busted for selling under carated goods. Some were even advertising that they were selling 10kt gold AND EVEN THEIR 10KT was less than 10kt. We did not get caught in that sting as we are careful about the metal content we use and the manufactures we do business with.

Kind regards,
Rhino
 

Rook

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
294
I asked these questions to a custom ring desiger and this is the reply I received. The ring designer is very well respected so it would seem as the advise is sound. I am open to critics though.

"I do not feel that "V" prongs afford as much protection for a pointed end stone as the type that you see in the photo you have sent. The prong style that I use is much thicker and more durable that the typically much thinner metal used in standard "V" prong settings. I feel that my prongs act as a better "bumper" to protect against impact and that they will last for a much longer period of time.


The depth of scratches in any metal is the direct result of the cause of the scratch. Strong force against a hard, sharp object will cause proportionate damage. Some platinum alloys are harder than others. The hardest alloys resist scratching better than others and also have the tendency to crack after casting. Some of the hardest alloys don't tend to "scratch" easily but they are not as resistant to overall wear and abrasion over the course of decades - they will wear out more rapidly than some of the softer alloys. The alloys with more moderate hardness will scratch more readily and they will out last the more scratch resistant alloys. This is because, with the more moderate alloys, the metal is not inclined to shear away when scratched. The metal in the softer alloys is displaced or moved to the sides of the scratch but not cut away from the body of the piece as readily. If you want a harder metal, it might be best to stay with 18k., high nickel white gold for the ring body and 5% ruthenium/95% platinum for the crown. "


Any comments?
 

Rook

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
294
Any thoughts on the comment above?

I was told by someone else that the prongs on this setting will snag on latex gloves (my intended works in a chem lab) and I should think about a different type of prong.
 

Rhino

Ideal_Rock
Trade
Joined
Mar 28, 2001
Messages
6,273
We've used both prongs and haven't had any major problems with either. Aesthetically I think the "V" looks better. Whoever is making the setting for you though ... go with their recommendation. As far as the alloys and such ... all quality platinum rings will either be of the 95/5 90/10 combo which is all good. I haven't heard complaints from either camp that was unique to the alloy's used so the platinum smith you're talking with may have some points. Get more than one opinion though.

If you're talking with Mark however ... you're getting sound advice. He works with platinum day in and day out and would know more about that than I would.

Peace,
Rhino
 

Rook

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
294
Yep, its Mark. I basically will listen to his commands. Just looking for opinions.

I am not sure what I think about visual difference between v or regular prong. I think maybe regular unless the diamond has a long l/w ratio, then maybe v.

What do you think about the latex gloves issue. That comment is not from Mark and I have not spoke to him about it yet.
 

chas

Rough_Rock
Joined
Jan 23, 2003
Messages
68
Rook,
Like Rhino said, listen to what Mark Morrell says. He won't steer you wrong. He is doing a setting for me now. I listened to him many times along the way and he was always right!


chas
 
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