shape
carat
color
clarity

Oh those Millennials ;)

kenny

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Jambalaya|1460915845|4020474 said:
I also think that people in general are very controlling, always asking others when they are going to marry their partner or when they are going to reproduce, and basically asking very personal questions all-round.
I wish people would butt out of others' business and realize it's OK to be single/childless/overweight/not traditionally "attractive."

Just delete such people from your life.

You're the boss of your life.
 

NOYFB

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I got 93, but I'm Gen X. Weird.
 

packrat

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It's all them tattoos LM! We be like the young 'n hip folks!
 

Gypsy

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MissGotRocks|1460909379|4020440 said:
The baby boomers spoke of the 'generation gap'. Truth is from that point forward there was always a generation gap between generations. Life changed so fast - particularly in the realm of technology. I must admit however that I do admire the spirit with which these younger people live their lives. As Gypsy pointed out, they are not worried with nor impressed by large houses and being competitive with family and friends over material possession. That in and of itself presents a freedom that is just wonderful. Do your own thing, live the life you want, spend and save your money according to your desires and not some prescribed formula from long ago. It makes me wonder what we would have done and where we would have been if we hadn't had a large home to pay for and maintain. However, it was right for us at the time and I don't regret it. It is my life story but probably won't be that of my children. When they speak of larger homes, they speak of upkeep, taxes and utilities - and not wanting to be tied into that for a lifetime. Enough space to live, all space utilized instead of rooms that aren't used, etc., etc. Two homes? Nah - who wants that? Rent something when you want to go somewhere else for a bit - don't own it. Makes perfect sense when you think about it. Both Moms and Dads today are very interactive with their children - mothering doesn't only come from the mothers anymore! What a novel concept! Babies aren't kept home napping in cribs - they are out enjoying life too. I admire their down to earth common sense approach to much in life. Negatives? Yes but there were negatives to my generation as well. People continue to grow and thrive in spite of all of it. Their lives won't mirror us oldies - they will by and large have to fund their own retirements and health care costs and I'm guessing by the time they grow old society will have had to change its outlook on how and where they will be cared for - cause this generation just won't have the money - ha!


I totally agree with you when it comes to all of this, but especially the changes in child rearing. So great to see. Much more practical and even handed parenting. And the generation after that will be more so. :appl: I love that.

I am really enjoying this thread.
 

Gypsy

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kenny|1460930839|4020556 said:
Jambalaya|1460915845|4020474 said:
I also think that people in general are very controlling, always asking others when they are going to marry their partner or when they are going to reproduce, and basically asking very personal questions all-round.
I wish people would butt out of others' business and realize it's OK to be single/childless/overweight/not traditionally "attractive."

Just delete such people from your life.

You're the boss of your life.

I agree with this. But also think it depends where you live too.

When we lived in NJ people were A LOT nosier than her in Nor Cal. No one here really cares what you do, who you do it with, or what your life choices are unless they are quite close to you. One of the things I like best about it here.

I've been to TX quite a bit, and again... nosy nosy nosy. "What church do you go to?" The assumption in that gets my back up each time.
 
Q

Queenie60

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I scored a 60.
 

GliderPoss

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I got 67 which surprised me as I'm considered so old fashioned by most of my friends & family! :lol:
 

Mesma

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Hah! Not going to do this test as I won't let a score define me! (I believe that statement puts my Millennial score at over 9000 :dance: )

But aside from that - what's not to love? Environmentally conscious, socially sensitive, based in logic and science yet respectful of faith and religion... I'm not going to pretend I'm not completely and utterly biased, but I do get sad every time I hear the song "Land of Confusion" by Genesis, and with it the old dreams of young and naive baby boomers.
 

Dancing Fire

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Queenie60|1460959200|4020712 said:
I scored a 60.
You are normal... :wink2: :lol:
 

missy

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Dancing Fire|1460925326|4020521 said:
missy|1460820845|4020011 said:
Thanks for the quiz. I got 59. :halo:

What did you get?
Same as you missy... :wacko:

OMG never did I think we would get the same score on anything DF. LOL.
Well I am a baby boomer so I guess it's not a complete shock. :shock: :bigsmile:

You scored higher than my dh DF. And he is way more liberal than you. That proves it. The quiz is fatally flawed! :lol:



Gypsy said:
kenny|1460930839|4020556 said:
Jambalaya|1460915845|4020474 said:
I also think that people in general are very controlling, always asking others when they are going to marry their partner or when they are going to reproduce, and basically asking very personal questions all-round.
I wish people would butt out of others' business and realize it's OK to be single/childless/overweight/not traditionally "attractive."

Just delete such people from your life.

You're the boss of your life.

I agree with this. But also think it depends where you live too.

When we lived in NJ people were A LOT nosier than her in Nor Cal. No one here really cares what you do, who you do it with, or what your life choices are unless they are quite close to you. One of the things I like best about it here.

I've been to TX quite a bit, and again... nosy nosy nosy. "What church do you go to?" The assumption in that gets my back up each time.

Yes I agree with this too. In NYC I don't find people are nosy or in your personal business. You can be as anonymous as you please there and in general people live and let live. But in NJ (at least the areas in which we have lived and currently live part time) yeah some people are quite prying and intrusive. I don't like it. Leave us be and live your lives and it is none of your business what we do and whom we do it with etc. Get off my lawn! :lol:

Seriously though we nipped that in the bud with one of our neighbors. We were firm and adamant and wouldn't change something that was none of their business and while we are no longer friendly like we used to be (that was mistake one and why they felt free to tell us what to do and not respect our figurative boundaries) we are still cordial and say good morning and hello etc when we see them. But (for now) they leave us alone and all is well. When people start not respecting boundaries just put them in their place and be firm and polite but no nonsense. That should put most people back where they belong. On their side of the fence. :halo:
 

liaerfbv

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I love when people make comments about Millenials being special snowflakes and yet make no mention of the parents who did a shitty job raising their kids... :lol:

I'm almost 32, so I'm right on the cusp of Gen X/Millenial and I don't have a problem being described as either. I think Millenials ARE hard workers - they just work differently than previous generations and have different priorities. My dad worked his entire life at a job he hated and made it very clear to me that I deserve respect from a boss. I left a job a few years ago because my boss did not respect my boundaries (constantly texting me after hours and asking me work unpaid from home) - does that mean that I'm not a hard worker because as a person in my 20s (at the time), I refused to be taken advantage of? I feel previous generations "put up" with things like that at work more than my generation does. I know my worth, and that does not make me a special snowflake. I work very hard and have a very strong work ethic, but I will not stay in a situation (work or otherwise) that makes me unhappy. It seems sometimes we applaud older generations for leaving difficult situations but when Millenials make the same choices, we are flighty or unable to deal with negativity. IMO, I think we just cut through the bullshit faster.

I also look forward to the time when the majority of voting Americans are open-minded, largely non-religious Millenial voters. DH and I also joke that we can't wait until our generation is running for president in 20 years and oh the things that will pop up from Facebook during their college years.
 

missy

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liaerfbv|1460982951|4020745 said:
I love when people make comments about Millenials being special snowflakes and yet make no mention of the parents who did a shitty job raising their kids... :lol:

I'm almost 32, so I'm right on the cusp of Gen X/Millenial and I don't have a problem being described as either. I think Millenials ARE hard workers - they just work differently than previous generations and have different priorities. My dad worked his entire life at a job he hated and made it very clear to me that I deserve respect from a boss. I left a job a few years ago because my boss did not respect my boundaries (constantly texting me after hours and asking me work unpaid from home) - does that mean that I'm not a hard worker because as a person in my 20s (at the time), I refused to be taken advantage of? I feel previous generations "put up" with things like that at work more than my generation does. I know my worth, and that does not make me a special snowflake. I work very hard and have a very strong work ethic, but I will not stay in a situation (work or otherwise) that makes me unhappy. It seems sometimes we applaud older generations for leaving difficult situations but when Millenials make the same choices, we are flighty or unable to deal with negativity. IMO, I think we just cut through the bullshit faster.

I also look forward to the time when the majority of voting Americans are open-minded, largely non-religious Millenial voters. DH and I also joke that we can't wait until our generation is running for president in 20 years and oh the things that will pop up from Facebook during their college years.


Me too liaerfbv. If it is OK I would like to add a few positive traits of the Baby Boomer Generation and Generation X too.

I am proud to be a Baby Boomer/Gen X person. Born in 1965 I'm right on the cusp of the 2 generations. I think all generations have much to offer and share and learn from one another.

We were the beginning of social, economic equality. The beginning of the Civil Rights movement and the Women's Equal Rights movement. The workplace began evolving from a fairly racially homogenous, paternalistic environment to one of increased racial and gender diversity. There was much political and social change happening in the nation during this time.

The Baby Boomer generation got that the world didn't owe them anything and did not feel entitled. We were an independent generation as compared to the previous one. Times were hard and we were appreciative of all we had and yes we were resourceful.

We were Idealistic. Optimistic. Competitive. We questioned authority.
We wanted to build a successful career and worked hard to get what we wanted. Money and titles and recognition were important to us.

We also got to experience real life dating and flirting. Things have changed quite a bit from one generation to the next with technology and all but I for one am glad I got to date the old fashioned way.

Plus we have (had at least as now my attention span is just as bad LOL) longer attention spans. And we said things to your face because we had little choice. Nowadays with so many online devices etc there is a lot of passive aggressive stuff happening compared to the "good old days" of just mustering up the courage and telling it like it is to that person's face.
A more personal touch if you will. For better or worse.


Generation Xers: highly adaptive to change and technology. Resourceful. Self reliant. Skeptical. Distrustful of Institutions. Balance b.w work and life freedom in a way not done by any previous generation before them. Flexible and motivated.

All generations have something to offer and have learned from the generations before them. Without the generations before them they would not exist. And we can all learn from each other. None of us perfect but all of us having much to offer. IMO.



 

Laila619

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I'm just barely a millennial, but I scored 29. The reason why is because I don't text. In fact, I hardly ever use or even carry a cell phone. I still have my Motorola Razr!
 

NOYFB

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packrat|1460942375|4020622 said:
It's all them tattoos LM! We be like the young 'n hip folks!

That must be it!
 

Gypsy

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missy|1460980418|4020740 said:
Yes I agree with this too. In NYC I don't find people are nosy or in your personal business. You can be as anonymous as you please there and in general people live and let live. But in NJ (at least the areas in which we have lived and currently live part time) yeah some people are quite prying and intrusive. I don't like it. Leave us be and live your lives and it is none of your business what we do and whom we do it with etc. Get off my lawn! :lol:

Seriously though we nipped that in the bud with one of our neighbors. We were firm and adamant and wouldn't change something that was none of their business and while we are no longer friendly like we used to be (that was mistake one and why they felt free to tell us what to do and not respect our figurative boundaries) we are still cordial and say good morning and hello etc when we see them. But (for now) they leave us alone and all is well. When people start not respecting boundaries just put them in their place and be firm and polite but no nonsense. That should put most people back where they belong. On their side of the fence. :halo:


Missy, true story. WARNING TMI- WOMENS ISSUE POST TO FOLLOW:

I had an undiagnosed fibroid (despite 4 ultrasounds) that caused me to pretty much bleed for almost 3 years straight. At one point I started chewing on ice uncontrollably. I would crave ice like you wouldn't believe.

During this 'ice crazy' phase, we had to go to NJ for a wedding. I was in poor health during the trip and decided to go to my MIL's salon with her to get my hair done because I had ZERO patience for doing it myself.

So I'm sitting in the salon and they ask me if I want something to drink offering me refreshments. And, in case you haven't experienced it, there is NOTHING like a NJ women's salon for NOSY. Nothing, in my experience that comes close. I replied that I just want a cup of ice, and, knowing it was strange, explain, "I've had the worst craving for ice recently."

From FOUR CHAIRS OVER (hand to God) a voice pipes up: "You're anemic."

What?

"You, young lady, the one with the ice problem. Your anemic."

"Me? I am?"

"Yes, It's called Pica. You are anemic. Talk to you doctor and tell them."

And that is how I found out I was anemic. Ended up in the hospital (after we returned to CA) for transfusions of blood and iron as a result.

So... maybe there's a small upside to the nosy. On occasion. :lol:
 

missy

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Gypsy, LOL and I know all about PICA and that is very true about the anemia thing but you already know that now. :bigsmile:
Yes sometimes it is nice having others look out for us and care about us. It is the nosy for nosiness sake that I loathe but that kind of nosiness that you experienced in the hair salon that helped you I am good with. 8) Glad it helped you. :appl:

Interesting new documentary coming out about the Millennials that I want to share with you guys.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/millennials-growing-up-in-the-21st-century-review-a-generation-of-innocents-lost-1461883224

Millennials: Growing Up in the 21st Century’ Review: A Generation of Innocents Lost

Ovation’s six-part documentary following 22 children over 15 years is like a real-life version of ‘Boyhood’ but much more disturbing

By NANCY DEWOLF SMITH
April 28, 2016 6:40 p.m. ET


In 2001, Seattle-based filmmaker Rick Stevenson began to document the lives of children, interviewing them annually over 15 years with a series of questions designed to, as he says, “encourage self-discovery.” The 22 subjects of “Millennials,” who appear to have been preteens or close to it when filming began, may not have been the only children Mr. Stevenson interviewed for the project. In fact, the portraits on display tend to be so painful to behold that the only antidote is the hope that they are not representative of their generation at large. Yet the fear that they may be typical will never leave your head.

Each of six episodes features the stories of several children. In the three episodes available for review, most children come out almost bouncing with happiness or at least optimism. Love of family—and the presence of two caring parents—is a common theme. There’s a reason to smile. “I have high hopes for myself” one pretty 12-year-old girl beams.

Before we know it, though, a couple of years have passed, and the former high-hoper is showing us the scars on her body where she has cut herself with scissors and a butcher knife. She has been hospitalized as suicidal after finding a man online who promised her 420 sleeping pills if she went to bed with him. And on and on the painful revelations go until—now in her midteens and with multiple piercings, black-lined eyes and dyed red hair—she reveals that she was sexually molested in seventh grade by an older boy.

When we first meet one young man, he seems to have typical hopes of a future filled with a job and marriage and children. By his third-year interview, however, he says he has slit his wrists with a debit card, “picked up a drug addiction,” had “suicidal ideations,” been arrested and had sex with multiple men. “I hate the way I am,” he says.

Another interviewee is a girl we meet at 10 as she explains her ambition to be a singer or actress. Several years later she’s been on drugs, “sleeping with guys to make me feel better,” in jail and then trying detox from heroin alone in her room.


Some things change with time. Like the boy who eventually grows into a proud young gay man, the girl who was molested finds a path to healing. The girl who once dreamed of being an actress now understands that the paralyzing childhood anguish about her appearance is called body dysmorphic disorder. Most of Mr. Stevenson’s other interviewees also seem to end their growing-up story with a sense of relative calm after the storms of adolescence. But those storms—whether they were set off by divorce, parental alcoholism, inflexible social norms, sexual-identity challenges or fulminating anxiety—have destroyed a part of every life here.

Baby boomers grew up in the shadow of nuclear annihilation, in a time when teenage angst usually had to be resolved without therapy. But relatively few then were so scarred as are these millennials, by things like cocaine and Adderall binges, alcohol abuse and promiscuity—all the while tortured by depression, hacking at their wrists with bread knives and, in one case, exposed to devastating national attention after receiving a creepy picture from then-Rep. Anthony Weiner. Even the immigrant stories here are a grim litany—a dreamer denied his greatest dream, a Vietnamese woman crushed in the clash of cultures, a Muslim boy who almost lost his identity trying to hide his religion.


You could argue that “Millennials” wouldn’t have been worth making unless it focused on the most fragile and vulnerable subjects, so that parents and others may draw lessons from these particular young people’s journeys of self-discovery.

But what of the consequences? While by early adulthood the nine young people in the episodes I saw appeared to have found a safer niche in life, it seems clear that they are not prepared to embrace the world and all its possibilities in the way of earlier generations.
 
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