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New osteoporosis diagnosis - please advise?

Begonia

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Not. At. All!!!
Please keep going with the info and sharing. I have been ignoring my osteoporosis for the above reasons, and this information helps me (all of us) get on track and make informed decisions. I’m most grateful for your sharing:appl:
 

missy

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Not. At. All!!!
Please keep going with the info and sharing. I have been ignoring my osteoporosis for the above reasons, and this information helps me (all of us) get on track and make informed decisions. I’m most grateful for your sharing:appl:
Thanks @Begonia it's a bit overwhelming and one (big) concern I have while reading/researching and finding reputable resources is that some feel these meds cause the bones to get more brittle despite improving the DEXA score.

Some feel that while OP meds may increase bone density scores they do not make your bones healthier they make your bones more brittle making you more at risk to fracture. This is what I am trying to find more info about. And obviously a huge concern because if this is true there is little point to taking OP meds. In fact taking them would worsen the odds re fracture. But and this is a big but I have to find reputable research illustrating this. The big problem here is that much is unknown still.

Even my rheumatologist said that it is not public knowledge (however if you look for this info you can find it as I have) that once one discontinues Prolia (for example) that bone loss is rapid and might put you in a more dangerous situation than before Prolia. This greatly concerns me. This should not be kept hidden. What else is being kept under wraps so to speak? Why do we have to be detectives searching for the truth/facts? Oh wait, it's because the pharmaceutical companies are the ones who do (out of) the research. :knockout:
And what is another concern is that despite the above being fact my rheumatologist gave Prolia to me as one of my options. WTH. SMH.

I am also researching more "natural" options but I have a healthy cynicism about all of this. There are so many differing opinions. And it seems low impact exercise while better than nothing doesn't do a whole lot re increasing bone density and bone health. It is the high impact exercise that does more for one's bones. But if one's bones are not in great shape you run the risk of fracture while doing high impact exercise so not recommended. Catch 22. You can imagine why this is frustrating.

Especially because someone taking OP meds and then repeating the DEXA scan and seeing improvement might not actually have stronger bones. That is worrisome. There is something called the FRAX- Fracture Risk Assessment Tool which is another risk assessment tool we can use to determine the risk of fracture. So the DEXA scan is but one tool in our arsenal. Worrisome that I do not hear many physicians (mine included) discussing FRAX.
The FRAX info is discussed in one of the links I shared yesterday.
My rheumatologist (by all accounts an excellent physician) is going by my DEXA scan and perhaps my weight when assessing my fracture risk and determining he feels I need to start one of the OP meds. Whichever one I start is up to me. However at no point during our visit did he mention FRAX before stating he would start OP meds if this were him.

I will add info as I find it but please remember I am not an expert and do not want to lead anyone astray. Please add anything you might come across and we can continue sharing what we find and hopefully help others too. Anyone reading this who is on OP meds or has any experience with them please share. Thanks.
 

Elizabeth35

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Thanks for all your research Missy. I too am feeling frustrated after reading about the meds.
And to find out that low impact weight-bearing exercise doesn't do much is so disappointing. Ughhh.

Since one in four women over 50 have osteoporosis, we have lots of company. This fact does help me keep some perspective. 90% of osteoporotic fractures are the result of falls. So fall risk management is a big part of the equation in my mind. Even if our bones are less dense and/or more brittle--if we can avoid falls, we avoid much of the fracture risk.


Online FRAX tool:

 

missy

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Thanks for all your research Missy. I too am feeling frustrated after reading about the meds.
And to find out that low impact weight-bearing exercise doesn't do much is so disappointing. Ughhh.

Since one in four women over 50 have osteoporosis, we have lots of company. This fact does help me keep some perspective. 90% of osteoporotic fractures are the result of falls. So fall risk management is a big part of the equation in my mind. Even if our bones are less dense and/or more brittle--if we can avoid falls, we avoid much of the fracture risk.


Online FRAX tool:

Thanks @Elizabeth35. True about avoiding falls but there are falls caused by the fracture first. That’s a concern. I agree we must put it all in perspective however. I am almost 2 SDs below where I should be for my age. I have old bones :(. I guess it matches my old soul. Lol and :(

I will continue keeping this thread updated with my findings and thank you so much @Elizabeth35 for sharing. We are in good company.
 

missy

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Just saw my dermatologist who’s a smart guy. He looked at my DEXA scan and said I cannot not treat. Period. So he is sending me to head of rheumatology at his hospital and I have to decide what treatment but not treating is not an option according to him. I have time to research more because my appointment is in April.

@Begonia I don’t know your t score or fracture risk but depending on how far along your osteoporosis is you might want a second opinion too and consider a more aggressive route. David said when it’s in the spine (as my most severe t score shows) you do not want to fool around. Not that any of us are fooling around but you know what I mean.

And he said even if the treatments aren’t great not treating is worse. Sigh.
 

Begonia

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I’m so far behind you in knowledge missy! I’ll have to do more reading, but first I need to revisit my doc for what kind of scan I had, and the exact results. I know he said definitely osteoporosis. Sigh. They measured my spine and femur.

How disheartening about resistance exercise. I joined a gym and hired a trainer to show me the ropes, and develop routines. I have several herniated discs from a work accident and can’t just dive in, or jump around (which is probably what those bones need). On a positive note, I’m getting stronger muscles, core etc and have less back pain and twinges from the discs. I have the dreaded triad: white, thin and early menopause, but the exercises are giving this skinny chicken some muscles.

My doc wanted me to start with Fosamax but that has been delayed. Truth be told, I’m nervous to try it as I already suffer acid reflux and am not tolerant of meds for that beyond gaviscon and managing it thru lifestyle. Lately, with stress, it’s in a bad patch.

Oh dear.
 

missy

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@Begonia i think resistance exercise is your best bet right now. I’m doing that too. Nothing too strenuous til we know we can handle it. And it is better than nothing. We will get through this one day at a time. It didn’t happen overnight and we are not going to “fix” overnight but baby steps.

And I’m with you re Fosomax. I can’t do the oral meds because if a very sensitive esophagus so that’s why I’m researching the other meds. Maybe there’s a better med for you since you have reflux.

Hang in there and I will continue to share anything I think might be helpful. And as always sending you good wishes and gentle (((hugs))).
 

OboeGal

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Oh, my.....I'm so sorry all of you lovely ladies are having to deal with this. @missy - what the heck? 2020 was the year things were supposed to get so much BETTER for you and Greg! Arrrgghh....

I appreciate this discussion, and all the posted info, very much. I haven't had a diagnosis of osteoporosis yet, but I think that's only because I have avoided having a scan since more than 10 years ago (which was fine at the time). I have nearly all the risk factors - especially hormone loss from a complete hysterectomy at 42 - so I think this is coming for me, if not already here. I do take vitamin d and both MK4 and MK7, but I've only taken about 1 mg once per day of the MK-4, and based on the article missy posted, that is grossly inadequate. @missy, if it's at all helpful, I use the Carlson MK4, which provides 5mg per capsule. (I had been splitting the amount to take 1/5 capsule per day.) Although it's not optimum, 9 of these per day would meet the minimum requirement the article mentioned. I believe, based on previous reading about K2, that MK4 has a short half-life - 8 hours, I think? - so optimum dosing might be three capsules with some food, three times a day.

Hormones might be something else to consider - I know that a good balance of estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone are important to bone health. My understanding is that each has their own important role to play. Of course, hormones are quite the rabbit hole, and as I've learned since my surgery, achieving "balance" is pretty much like dancing on the head of a pin.

The one thing in my life that I do consistently right, health-wise, is exercise (except for a period around 2013-2014 when other health issues interfered too much). I regularly do high-impact stuff. My recent regimen incorporates high-intensity intervals - usually as either sprints or burpees - three times a week as well as walking my dog 30-60 minutes every day that weather allows. I love doing aerobic stuff. Resistance training - well, that I hate with a fiery passion, and I've been spotty about doing it in the past. I would do it regularly for a while, then stop for a while, try to restart, falter, etc. I have reincorporated rounds of squats, lunges, and side rows with weights, and modified push-ups that I HOPE will become full push-ups if I get strong enough, every week for a few months now. Crossing my fingers that all this has helped.

Guess I need to "sack up" and get to the doctor and get tests run, rather than continuing to wave my behind in the air with my head firmly planted in the sand hiding from reality. :shifty:
 

missy

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Oh, my.....I'm so sorry all of you lovely ladies are having to deal with this. @missy - what the heck? 2020 was the year things were supposed to get so much BETTER for you and Greg! Arrrgghh....

I appreciate this discussion, and all the posted info, very much. I haven't had a diagnosis of osteoporosis yet, but I think that's only because I have avoided having a scan since more than 10 years ago (which was fine at the time). I have nearly all the risk factors - especially hormone loss from a complete hysterectomy at 42 - so I think this is coming for me, if not already here. I do take vitamin d and both MK4 and MK7, but I've only taken about 1 mg once per day of the MK-4, and based on the article missy posted, that is grossly inadequate. @missy, if it's at all helpful, I use the Carlson MK4, which provides 5mg per capsule. (I had been splitting the amount to take 1/5 capsule per day.) Although it's not optimum, 9 of these per day would meet the minimum requirement the article mentioned. I believe, based on previous reading about K2, that MK4 has a short half-life - 8 hours, I think? - so optimum dosing might be three capsules with some food, three times a day.

Hormones might be something else to consider - I know that a good balance of estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone are important to bone health. My understanding is that each has their own important role to play. Of course, hormones are quite the rabbit hole, and as I've learned since my surgery, achieving "balance" is pretty much like dancing on the head of a pin.

The one thing in my life that I do consistently right, health-wise, is exercise (except for a period around 2013-2014 when other health issues interfered too much). I regularly do high-impact stuff. My recent regimen incorporates high-intensity intervals - usually as either sprints or burpees - three times a week as well as walking my dog 30-60 minutes every day that weather allows. I love doing aerobic stuff. Resistance training - well, that I hate with a fiery passion, and I've been spotty about doing it in the past. I would do it regularly for a while, then stop for a while, try to restart, falter, etc. I have reincorporated rounds of squats, lunges, and side rows with weights, and modified push-ups that I HOPE will become full push-ups if I get strong enough, every week for a few months now. Crossing my fingers that all this has helped.

Guess I need to "sack up" and get to the doctor and get tests run, rather than continuing to wave my behind in the air with my head firmly planted in the sand hiding from reality. :shifty:
Good luck @OboeGal hopefully you are A OK and do not need to be concerned with this topic for a very very long while if at all. @Begonia and I are very young to be dealing with this at our age. Partly due to genetics and partly due to body makeup and other health conditions that perhaps exacerbated it for us.

Sounds like you do it all right health wise and given your weights and working out you should be just fine! I stopped doing weights after I broke my leg in 2014. Just never resumed them on a regular basis.

So update from me. My rheumatologist called me right after I saw my dermatologist yesterday. We were still at NYU waiting for Greg to be seen by his doctor. Anyway, my rheumatologist got my blood results and he wants me to hold off on doing any OP meds for 2 months while I supplement with Calcium. My PTH levels came back high. BUT my calcium is also high which points to a PTH issue which could be completely separate (probably is) from my OP. However he wants me to start supplementation with Calcium to see if it helps. His theory is that calcium could be being leeched from my bones due to not having enough in my diet. My blood calcium is high and for some reason I could not be absorbing it well. Malabsorption. So not sure supplementation is the right way to go...it might make matter worse but he wants me to do it and then he will reevaluate the PTH in 2 months. I emailed my endocrinologist but have not heard back yet. Because I am nervous to supplement with Calcium. It could cause lots of other health issues. What a see saw.
 

missy

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FYI I have not yet watched this but supposedly it is a good video. When I have the energy I will watch and thought some of you might find it helpful.

 

missy

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Just watched the video above. Not sure if it will be valuable or not for you but it was interesting.
 

missy

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osteo-clinical-guidelines.png
 

missy

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Interesting article. If I’m understanding it correctly it seems fractures have gone up in the USA in the last few years due to decreasing treatment of OP.

 

missy

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Thank you for sharing your research with us.
Thank you @Bonfire my pleasure. It’s a scary diagnosis and treatment and if I can help anyone else with my research and experience that would be wonderful.
 

missy

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The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved an osteoporosis drug that represents the first new treatment approach in nearly two decades — a strategy based on a rare gene mutation in people with bones so dense that they never break.
About 10 million people in the United States have osteoporosis. Worldwide, about 200 million people have brittle bones; one in three women, and one in five men, will suffer a fracture because of osteoporosis, often of the hip or spine. For many, the break leads to a downward spiral of disability.
Standard treatments, drugs called bisphosphonates, stop the loss of bone but do not build it. The alternatives, parathyroid hormone and a derivative, build bone but also break it down, limiting the therapeutic effect.
The new drug, romosozumab (brand name Evenity), developed by Amgen in collaboration with the Belgian drug company UCB, restores bone without breaking it down, according to the findings of two large clinical trials.


It was approved only for postmenopausal women with a high risk of fracture, and will carry a warning on its label that it may increase the risk of heart attack or stroke, the F.D.A. said.

“This is an extraordinarily important drug,” said Dr. Richard Bockman, chief of the endocrine service at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York. “It’s a true bone-building drug that takes advantage of the underlying biology of bone.”



In large clinical trials, patients taking the drug saw increases in bone density in their spines on the order of 15 percent — a huge figure, similar to the amount of bone made in early adolescence, said Dr. Clifford J. Rosen, an osteoporosis expert at Maine Medical Center Research Institute and member of an F.D.A. panel that evaluated the data.

Merely a 6 percent increase in bone density can translate into a doubling of bone strength, Dr. Bockman said. In the trials, patients taking the drugs saw a reduction in breaks, both in the spine and “clinical” fractures — broken bones that a patient notices, rather than, say, a collapsed vertebra discovered only in X-rays.
In one study, spinal fractures occurred in 127 of 2,046 patients taking the new drug, compared with 243 of 2,047 taking alendronate, an older drug.


“It’s a tremendous advance,” said Dr. Dolores Shoback, a professor of medicine and an osteoporosis expert at the University of California, San Francisco.

But there also was a small, unexpected increase in heart attacks, strokes and sudden deaths in that study — 50 of 2,040 patients, or 2.5 percent, taking Evenity, compared with 38 of 2,014, or 1.9 percent, taking alendronate.

The effect was seen in one of the two large clinical trials, but not the other.

The F.D.A. said it was requiring the boxed warning on the drug’s label saying the drug should not be used by people who had a heart attack or stroke in the past year. Doctors should also consider whether to prescribe the drug to patients at high risk for heart attacks and strokes. Patients who have a heart attack or stroke while taking Evenity should stop taking the drug.

Side effects can include joint pain and headaches and irritation at the injection site.

The agency is requiring the company to conduct a post-marketing study of cardiovascular risks.

It is hard to know what to make of the possible risk, said Dr. Bart Clarke, a professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic and president of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

“Maybe there is something unique about those patients,” he said.

Amgen would not disclose the price at the time of approval, saying it would be disclosed next week.

Evenity will be given as a monthly injection. Parathyroid hormone is given as a daily injection, while the drugs in the other major treatment class, the bisphosphonates, are taken as pills.



The new drug has a striking back story.
In 1964, researchers began studying an unusual group of Afrikaner patients in South Africa. They were tall and heavy, but not fat. Instead, their bones were large and dense.
Their bones grew so profusely that their heads became distorted: Their jaws were large, and an overgrowth of bone in their skulls impinged upon nerves, often causing deafness or facial palsy. Many had terrible headaches. In some, the index and middle fingers fused together.
In 2001, scientists reported that all these effects resulted from a single gene mutation. The finding led researchers to understand how the body controls the building of bone.
Bones are in a state of constant flux, built up and broken down by the body. In osteoporosis, the balance is disrupted — more bone is broken down than is made.
Bone cells make a protein called sclerostin that halts the production of bone and increases its breakdown. The gene mutation in the Afrikaner patients stops the production of sclerostin, so their bodies keep building bone without brakes.
Scientists reasoned that if they could mimic the mutation by blocking sclerostin with an antibody, people with osteoporosis should build more bone.
Once bone density increased, patients could stop taking the sclerostin-blocking drug and switch to an older drug to maintain the new bone. Animal studies were successful, as were clinical trials, culminating in two large studies involving more than 10,000 postmenopausal women.



In one trial, Evenity was compared to a placebo; in the other, it was compared to a bisphosphonate. In both studies, women taking Evenity ended up with more bone and fewer fractures.
In January, Evenity was reviewed by an advisory committee to the F.D.A., which voted 18 to 1 for approval — but called for Amgen to do more research to understand the possible cardiovascular side effects.
“There is a tremendous need for this medication, and there is an amazing amount of morbidity and mortality with this disease,” said Dr. Frederick G. Kushner, a cardiologist at the Heart Clinic of Louisiana and a panel member, who voted to approve the drug.
The next step, Dr. Bockman said, is for companies to develop pills to block sclerostin so patients do not have to have monthly injections.
It may not be easy to convince patients to take the new drug.
Experts anticipate that it will be offered to patients at highest risk: those who have had a serious fracture, or who have taken bisphosphonates and parathyroid hormone, and did not respond or experienced serious side effects.
All too often, however, high-risk patients are afraid to take drugs to prevent fractures. They remember stories of the rare patients who took bisphosphonates and had an unusual fractures or deterioration of the bones in their jaws.
“They don’t remember the good — that fractures are being prevented,” Dr. Shoback said. “They remember some pivotal terrible thing that someone told them.”
Dr. Bockman has seen these patients, too, but hopes they can be convinced at least to try Evenity.
“This is a very important, great new drug,” he said. “And it is something we really need.”


Correction: April 10, 2019
An earlier version of this article misspelled the name of an older drug used to treat osteoporosis. It is alendronate, not aldendronate.
 

Bonfire

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My Endocrinologist was excited about Evenity and had me read up and decide if I wanted to try it. I would essentially be a guinea pig as she had no other patients taking it, it was so new. The once monthly injections (2) are only good for one year. Then you go off and take another OP drug. In clinical trials there was significant cardio/stroke events and there were no types of patients it didn’t effect. In other words younger healthier women still had this significant risk. Therefore it carries a black box warning. Because of this I decided to go back on Prolia. I had been on it and had no bad side effects. I had taken a two year vacation from it. Maybe something better will be in the pipeline but for now I’m sticking with Prolia.
 

missy

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My Endocrinologist was excited about Evenity and had me read up and decide if I wanted to try it. I would essentially be a guinea pig as she had no other patients taking it, it was so new. The once monthly injections (2) are only good for one year. Then you go off and take another OP drug. In clinical trials there was significant cardio/stroke events and there were no types of patients it didn’t effect. In other words younger healthier women still had this significant risk. Therefore it carries a black box warning. Because of this I decided to go back on Prolia. I had been on it and had no bad side effects. I had taken a two year vacation from it. Maybe something better will be in the pipeline but for now I’m sticking with Prolia.
I think the same company that manufactures Prolia makes Evenity. They all carry risk and they all need to have a break from taking them though often one has to take another class of OP meds while on that break.

I know the risks are scary but they are still small relatively speaking. Of course that means nothing when we are the ones who experience said side effects. I hear you.

I am searching for the lowest risk drug that has a good efficacy. Not sure that drug exists.
What I like about Evenity is that is builds bone and not many of the OP meds do.
I might be misremembering but is Evenity the one that is banned in Europe? One of the OP meds are. Just cannot remember offhand if it is Evenity or not.

Thanks for weighing in and I am very pleased for you that Prolia is working out so well!
 

Bonfire

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I think the same company that manufactures Prolia makes Evenity. They all carry risk and they all need to have a break from taking them though often one has to take another class of OP meds while on that break.

I know the risks are scary but they are still small relatively speaking. Of course that means nothing when we are the ones who experience said side effects. I hear you.

I am searching for the lowest risk drug that has a good efficacy. Not sure that drug exists.
What I like about Evenity is that is builds bone and not many of the OP meds do.
I might be misremembering but is Evenity the one that is banned in Europe? One of the OP meds are. Just cannot remember offhand if it is Evenity or not.

Thanks for weighing in and I am very pleased for you that Prolia is working out so well!
Yes, Evenity is not approved in Europe.
 

missy

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Yesterday I ordered a weighted vest and will wear it doing the elliptical and walking outside. I am going to start slowly with 1 lb weights added and add up to one lb a week for a max of 8 lbs. Some research shows promise re weighted vests and osteoporosis but there is not a lot of research out there re weighted vests. I figure if I start slow and listen to my body I won't do any harm and it can only help. Makes sense if one adds weight to weight bearing exercises it can help build bone. Or at least that is the hope.

A very old study. Again not a lot of research unfortunately. Don't get me started about the fact if osteoporosis affected more men there would be more research and studies. I won't go there but :/





I ordered the vest (if any one is interested) from this website.


It is critical it fits well (snugly) and that one starts slowly. Also if you are considering it please talk with your doctor about it. Nothing I share here supersedes one's doctors advice. I am just starting my journey and anything I share is as a patient/consumer and not as a physician. Always consult your physician before starting any new exercise program. Thanks.
 

missy

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I am looking into Evista now. Shows some promise. Negative effects seem less than some of our other choices...




In postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, EVISTA (raloxifene hydrochloride) reduced the risk of fractures. EVISTA also increased BMD of the spine, hip and total body. Similarly, in postmenopausal women without osteoporosis, EVISTA preserved bone mass and increased BMD relative to calcium alone at 24 months. The effect on hip bone mass was similar to that for the spine.
 

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missy

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Sharing the K2 I ordered just now. It has 15 mg per serving (study shows you need 45 mg) and it has a minimum of fillers which is critical for me to tolerate it.


28b2fdba-b2e2-4b16-a06d-54520ddb5911-358-358.png

And I am taking Douglas Labs MK-7 so all the K2 is covered now though research shows MK-4 is the critical component for bone health. HTH.
 

missy

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I found this video to be quite helpful. Hope you find it helpful too.

 

missy

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Another imo excellent video. I hope you find it helpful. Provides a nice summary of the available meds and their possible side effects as well as a good overview of OP in general. If anyone watches them please share your thoughts. Thanks.

 

OboeGal

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missy

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Great info! I will switch to this one as soon as I finish my Carlson.
Hope it works well for you @OboeGal!
The K2 might arrive before the Calcium supplements I ordered last Tuesday because somehow UPS messed up (how rare and unusual lol) but I am taking a store bought Calcium brand in the meantime.

The videos I posted are IMO very informative especially the second one discussing the meds.
I have more videos to share if anyone is interested.
In the meantime here is a chart fyi.

Screen Shot 2020-02-29 at 8.37.06 AM.png

What is critical IMO is finding a med that will reduce both spine and hip fractures.

To that end Boniva hasn't been shown to reduce hip fractures. Only spine fractures. I cannot pretend to understand why as this is beyond my scope but that is what the scientific studies and evidence show. Something to consider for those of you who might be taking Boniva.

Sharing one more video. I am going to watch this one today if I find the time. But it comes highly recommended.

 

missy

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Just watched Dr Kagan’s presentation. Excellent.
 

Begonia

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Missy, I can’t thank you enough for posting all this. I’ve done very little research since my diagnosis - many personal problems that need immediate attention - so this is all getting me back in the game.

Thank you missy for helping a sister.

And all sisters.
 

missy

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Missy, I can’t thank you enough for posting all this. I’ve done very little research since my diagnosis - many personal problems that need immediate attention - so this is all getting me back in the game.

Thank you missy for helping a sister.

And all sisters.
@Begonia , I am so sorry you are dealing with more pressing issues at the moment and I hope things calm down soon. It is truly always something and very often multiple somethings :(
Sending you lots of good thoughts.

I am feeling (a bit) stressed re this diagnosis because all treatments carry risk. Each individual has to decide their risk/benefit ratio and what is important to them.

Vertebral compression fractures scare the heck out of me. More than hip fractures or other non vertebral fractures. I am trying to learn as much as I can and absorb as much as I can but of course we need a great medical professional on our team helping us choose. And that is where it gets more scary because I don't have anyone at the moment I feel is that medical team member.

I will share that (at this moment how I feel) if I can find a physician who would prescribe Evista for me I would want to try that med first. Despite being almost 10 years post menopausal (risk factor and this drug is best for those shortly after menopause) and despite my potential clotting risk factor due to my genetic makeup. This drug is contraindicated for those with clotting risks. Despite all those risk factors this is right now the drug I am leaning to for various reasons. The big question is can I find a good doctor who will be willing to prescribe this for me as I am not an ideal candidate. Having said that I am going to wait til I see my rheumatologist in 2 months to satisfy his and my curiosity re calcium supplementation. Though my gut says Calcium supplementation is not the way to go for me and might be detrimental. I am wiling to continue it for 2 months.

It is my pleasure to continue sharing here if it can help you and anyone else Begonia. I know firsthand how stressful this kind of a diagnosis is and it helps to support one another with info as well as just being there to listen and share ideas etc.

Continued good thoughts being sent your way and gentle (((hugs))).

Leaving you with a very good video re exercise which this physician feels should be the first line treatment for osteoporosis.


(The audio is challenging in some parts but still worthwhile watching IMO).

One point that was eye opening...Low weights have no effect on bone density. To increase BMD incorporate progressive resistance training of sufficient intensity.

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LightBright

Brilliant_Rock
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Joined
Mar 11, 2013
Messages
665
@lyra I think Vitamin D3 is better absorbed than D2. And it is easier on the stomach to take it in smaller doses every day vs the usually larger D2 dose that is prescribed by physicians. Just wanted to add my thoughts on that. Also make sure to take K2 with vitamin D. Very important.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3349454/

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/589256_4

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5613455/
Hi Missy, I’m sorry to ask this again but does anyone have reccomendations for brand and dose of cal mag, and K2. I’m looking for “pure” good quality brands but am overwhelmed. TIA. OP sorry to threadjack.
 
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