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Natural - Please Help!

Ruth150

Rough_Rock
Joined
Aug 17, 2016
Messages
31
Hope all is well with everyone! Can anyone identify the pearl in the necklace below? I was told that it's natural and not cultured. The pearls are between 7.5mm to 9mm and 17 1/2" long. Thank you in advance for any information! - Ruth

1_476.jpg

1a_4.jpg

1b.jpg

1o.jpg

1h.jpg

1c.jpg

1d_0.jpg

1e.jpg

1ea.jpg

1f.jpg

1g.jpg

1ha.jpg

1i.jpg

1j.jpg

1k.jpg

1l.jpg

1m.jpg

1n_0.jpg

1p.jpg

1q.jpg

1r.jpg
 

pearlsngems

Brilliant_Rock
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1,415
They look like cultured pearls to me.

Unless there is a report from a reliable lab like GIA that they are naturals (which involves x raying them), you should assume they are cultured.
 

Ruth150

Rough_Rock
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Aug 17, 2016
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Thank you for your input! I will schedule an x-ray for the necklace in the near future. - Ruth
 

pearlsngems

Brilliant_Rock
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Getting them certified will be expensive; if you have a friendly dentist who will xray them for you, you should be able to see if there is a bead inside. If no bead is visible, then pay to have them certified as natural by GIA.
 

seaurchin

Brilliant_Rock
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Nov 2, 2012
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Most pearls, by far, are cultured. For it to be wild pearls in that shape, size, and uniformity would be very unusual, very expensive and would likely come with papers, I think (and have a more expensive clasp than the standard little fishhook one shown).

They are most likely cultured freshwater or cultured akoya pearls. Many people mix up the terms and really mean that the pearls are "not artificial" when they say they're "natural" or "not cultured."

For one quick example, the natural pearl necklace below was estimated to be worth about $34,000 to $67,000. Also, see the color variations? So for starters, I'd consider who you got these from, if they'd be likely to have something like that, and what their expertise is.

http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/ecatalogue/2014/magnificent-jewels-noble-jewels-ge1402/lot.215.html

Do you know their approximate age?

If they're freshwater pearls, they probably don't have any beads inside. A nice strand, by the way!
 

Ruth150

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pearlsngems|1474816891|4080582 said:
Getting them certified will be expensive; if you have a friendly dentist who will xray them for you, you should be able to see if there is a bead inside. If no bead is visible, then pay to have them certified as natural by GIA.
I will post the x-ray result. Thank you for the reply!
 

ennui

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
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Messages
995
They could be Akoya or freshwater. They are nice and round. Many people say "natural" when they are trying to say the pearls are not fake.

It would help to get a photo against a plain white background, like a white paper towel. That would help to show the tones. I think the blue background is flattering to the pearls, but not helpful for analysis.

It's a pretty strand, do you wear it?
 

pearlsngems

Brilliant_Rock
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My guess is akoyas....

Also the lack of a bead is no proof that a pearl is natural; non-bead nucleated freshwaters are common.
 

Ruth150

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pearlsngems|1474829546|4080632 said:
My guess is akoyas....

Also the lack of a bead is no proof that a pearl is natural; non-bead nucleated freshwaters are common.
I do not believe they are akoyas and most of the pearls are 9mm or a bit over. They are too old (1920's) to be classified as non-bead nucleated freshwaters. In addition, they exhibit some iridescent colors that appear to change when seen from different angles or under different light. I've attached two images. What do you think?

00.jpg

00a.jpg
 

NacreLover

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1,939
Ruth150|1474836355|4080661 said:
pearlsngems|1474829546|4080632 said:
My guess is akoyas....

Also the lack of a bead is no proof that a pearl is natural; non-bead nucleated freshwaters are common.
I do not believe they are akoyas and most of the pearls are 9mm or a bit over. They are too old (1920's) to be classified as non-bead nucleated freshwaters. In addition, they exhibit some iridescent colors that appear to change when seen from different angles or under different light. I've attached two images. What do you think?

00.jpg

00a.jpg

Ruth, You have me confused. You don't believe they are akoya or non bead nucleated freshwater. What do you think they are? White South sea pearls? The clasp appears too new to be a art nouveau era strand the silk appears very clean with the exception of the gimp at the clasp ends also.
 

pearlsngems

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She thinks they are natural pearls.

I'm sticking with akoyas, which do get to that size. And cultured akoyas do go back to the 1920s.
 

Ruth150

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pearlsngems|1474844419|4080695 said:
She thinks they are natural pearls.

I'm sticking with akoyas, which do get to that size. And cultured akoyas do go back to the 1920s.

I do not think they are natural. Instead, someone told me they are. In conclusion, I will do the x-ray. Thanks! - Ruth
 

Ruth150

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In addition while I was researching online I found the following information... "In the 1950's, 60's and 70's a typical size for cultured pearls was 4mm to 6mm. Graduated necklaces were popular - ranging from a central 7mm diameter pearl to 3mm pearls at the necklace ends. A necklace from this era with large pearls was either fake or vastly expensive."
*Art Nouveau era was between 1890-1914. It was also professionally cleaned and restringed.
 

pearlsngems

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Ruth, you said you don't believe they are akoyas and that they are too old to be non-bead nucleated freshwaters.
If they date back to the 1920s then they are also too old to be cultured South Sea pearls.
So that only leaves naturals. (Or imitations.)

This is why I said that you think they are naturals.

But now to their age-- how do you know, or why do you think, they date back to the 1920s?
 

Ruth150

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Aug 17, 2016
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The necklace was inspected for its age and I was told that it's from that era.
 

ennui

Brilliant_Rock
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Feb 28, 2014
Messages
995
Well, if we rule out Akoya, natural and freshwater, that leaves ... glass. Have you done the 'tooth test'?

The silk is very clean for a necklace that old, if it is indeed from the 1920s. Also, pearls from that era would have a candlelight tone, not bright white.

Where did you get this necklace? Was it a gift, or an inheritance, or ... ? That may give some clues.
 

pearlsngems

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A simple pearl necklace with a modern looking clasp. I admit I am stumped as to why anyone would date it from the 1920s, sorry.
 

Ruth150

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Aug 17, 2016
Messages
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ennui|1474848000|4080713 said:
Well, if we rule out Akoya, natural and freshwater, that leaves ... glass. Have you done the 'tooth test'?

The silk is very clean for a necklace that old, if it is indeed from the 1920s. Also, pearls from that era would have a candlelight tone, not bright white.

Where did you get this necklace? Was it a gift, or an inheritance, or ... ? That may give some clues.
It was purchased from an antique shop. I did the tooth test and it's not faux or glass. The pearls are not bright white but kind of transparent and off-white glow.
The x-ray is the next thing in my list. Thank you for the replies!
 

katbran

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They look like cultured pearls. If they were natural they should have a certificate and cost a fortune. You can try the X-ray and it may show the bead but it might not as Dentist X-ray machines are not meant for this sort of work . ( I just heard a lecture from the head of GIA's division that investigates natural and/or treated pearls) . I too have no idea as to how they could possibly verify that these pearls are from he 1920's ...just because someone was told this doesn't make it true. Over all this seems pretty suspect. But it all depends on what you paid and if you like them.

Read about Candling - that might show the bead.
 

Ruth150

Rough_Rock
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Aug 17, 2016
Messages
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katbran|1474862922|4080765 said:
They look like cultured pearls. If they were natural they should have a certificate and cost a fortune. You can try the X-ray and it may show the bead but it might not as Dentist X-ray machines are not meant for this sort of work . ( I just heard a lecture from the head of GIA's division that investigates natural and/or treated pearls) . I too have no idea as to how they could possibly verify that these pearls are from he 1920's ...just because someone was told this doesn't make it true. Over all this seems pretty suspect. But it all depends on what you paid and if you like them.

Read about Candling - that might show the bead.
I'll ask my sister-in-law to arrange for the x-ray with one of her colleagues. She is a RN and works in a hospital. Thanks! - Ruth
 

Pearlescence

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This necklace is almost certainly made of cultured freshwater pearls, tissue nucleated and probably no more than 10 years old. The clasp is modern, the pearls are modern and the silk is recent. There is no way a non-laboratory expert could say that they were natural pearls, let alone an antique shop seller
Did the pearls come with a security guard. A genuine natural pearl necklace of that size, shape and quality from the 1920s would need one.
An x-ray will possibly tell you if there is a bead inside but not whether they are natural or tissue nucleated. Even if the clasp had a hallmark, which set the date of the clasp (which it doesn't), with these pearls I would not think that clasp and pearls had always been together.
Sorry
 

NacreLover

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Ruth150|1474845775|4080705 said:
In addition while I was researching online I found the following information... "In the 1950's, 60's and 70's a typical size for cultured pearls was 4mm to 6mm. Graduated necklaces were popular - ranging from a central 7mm diameter pearl to 3mm pearls at the necklace ends. A necklace from this era with large pearls was either fake or vastly expensive."
*Art Nouveau era was between 1890-1914. It was also professionally cleaned and restringed.
Even Art Deco clasps don't look like the one on your strand. All my older strands, bracelets and pins are creamy from age. This one doesn't have that look. Even your post above indicates your strand is modern.
 

Ruth150

Rough_Rock
Joined
Aug 17, 2016
Messages
31
I appreciate all the responses.
However, I will do the x-ray to further examine the internal structure of the pearls. The pearls are creamy and I performed the candling.
 

seaurchin

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Nov 2, 2012
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1,489
Well whatever it is, it's very nice-looking and a good size, too! Let us know what you find out. :)
 
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