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Feather in Princess, please advise...

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CMC1

Rough_Rock
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Feb 3, 2009
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Hi there, I would like some opinions from the resident diamond experts on the main stone of a ring I just purchased from bluenile. Please see attached pic with portions of the GIA cert. I made a closeup of the plot and drew over in red to make the inclusions more visible. Now what I am concerned about is the feather on the top right corner. I couldn''t see it from the scan of the GIA cert online when I ordered the diamond (if I could have I wouldn''t have picked this one). I can''t tell but it looks like it goes to the edge, and I''ve heard this can lead to the diamond splitting or chipping. The corner is under a prong. Does this look like a VS1 diamond to you, and should I return this for another diamond before my 30 days are up? I have an appointment with a local appraiser to inspect it, but I thought I would poll the forum aswell.


The setting is here:


http://www.bluenile.ca/diamond-engagement-ring-setting-platinum_5088?metal_filter=platinum&setting_filter=sidestone&sort_select=LTHP&show_all_pages=1&set_shape=


Thanks so much for your input.


CMC1.




GIA2101285821_zoom17.JPG
 

JulieN

Super_Ideal_Rock
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if GIA says it is a VS1, it is a VS1, and there is nothing to worry about.

Things that go to the exterior of the stone are marked in green.
 

CMC1

Rough_Rock
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Feb 3, 2009
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Thanks for taking the time to reply, JulieN. I found what you said very interesting, because I was under the impression that all feathers are coloured red. I can''t seem to find any info online that says a feather can be coloured green.
 

Lorelei

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Date: 2/3/2009 3:41:39 PM
Author: JulieN
if GIA says it is a VS1, it is a VS1, and there is nothing to worry about.

Things that go to the exterior of the stone are marked in green.
Ditto Julie. Also exterior inclusions are normally marked in green, this is commonplace.
 

John P

Ideal_Rock
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Indeed. On GIA reports inclusions (internal characteristics) are penned in red. Blemishes (external characteristics) are penned in green. In nearly all cases feathers are plotted in red, since they are primarily internal. If the feather ends at the surface, creating a nick, pit or other external irregularity, it is supposed to be indicated in green. This is in theory. I've seen surface-reaching feathers plotted in red only.

Diamonds are like snowflakes. Many aspects of clarity, cut, color, fluorescence, etc., bear in-person examination and evaluation. This diamond is no different. If the feather is completely encased it's likely no problem or the diamond would not have received VS1. All well and good, but get it verified by someone with gemological expertise who is spending time cuddling with the stone.

Princess Corners

Princess corners are vulnerable, feathers or no. They are especially vulnerable with inconsistent cutting: Some princess cuts have different chevroning in different quadrants which can make for a difficult setting process.

In addition to cut precision I have become a huge fan of cutters who chamfer their princess cuts. This is the practice of adding a tiny facet on the point of each corner for added protection. The AGS has welcomed this practice which is nice because those chamfers are undetectable but increase durability.

Skillful Setting

Three rules to keep in mind as you secure a princess cut...

RULE #1. The skill of the setter is of paramount importance.

Breakage and chipping of princess cuts is largely due to incorrect setting. If the diamond is not seated correctly, or if prong seats have not been cut level, there will always be potential for problems: The setter puts pressure on one corner then moves to the next corner and puts pressure there and so on...

Problems will occur:

A. If the seats are not level in the prongs of the ring.
B. If the stone itself is not set level in those seats.

In either of these cases, force will release pressure along a natural cleavage plane. This can happen whether the girdle is thick or thin, whether a feather is present or whether the diamond was chamfered. The solution is to cut the seats in the setting correctly in order to protect the diamond.


RULE #2. The skill of the setter is of paramount importance.

RULE #3. The skill of the setter is of paramount importance.
 

strmrdr

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23,295
Have your appraiser inspect it and get a professional in person opinion.
Going by what is plotted on the report can be problematic and not accurate.
All the plot tells me is get it inspected beyond that no conclusions can be drawn.
 

CMC1

Rough_Rock
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Feb 3, 2009
Messages
5
Thanks for all the input everyone.

I just got back from the independant appraiser (he has GIA cert and in the field for over 20 years), and he couldn''t even see that feather, so I assume that its tiny and hidden under the prong. What he said pretty well lined up with what you all were saying...very small chance of that feather causing a problem because of how small it is, being a VS1 stone. He also said it would mostly have to do with how the diamond was set by the jeweller, whether it is too tight, of if they left a tiny bit of room for the points of the princess, and he said it looked good. He also corroborated that the red line on the plot meant that it was internal and likely not reached the surface. Only a very hard bang would jeopardize the stone, but since I will have it insured, it won''t matter anyway. Thanks again everyone!
 

Lorelei

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Date: 2/4/2009 6:10:32 PM
Author: CMC1
Thanks for all the input everyone.

I just got back from the independant appraiser (he has GIA cert and in the field for over 20 years), and he couldn''t even see that feather, so I assume that its tiny and hidden under the prong. What he said pretty well lined up with what you all were saying...very small chance of that feather causing a problem because of how small it is, being a VS1 stone. He also said it would mostly have to do with how the diamond was set by the jeweller, whether it is too tight, of if they left a tiny bit of room for the points of the princess, and he said it looked good. He also corroborated that the red line on the plot meant that it was internal and likely not reached the surface. Only a very hard bang would jeopardize the stone, but since I will have it insured, it won''t matter anyway. Thanks again everyone!
Sounds like you are good to go!
 

Ellen

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Jan 13, 2006
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Date: 2/4/2009 9:44:21 AM
Author: John Pollard

Princess Corners

Princess corners are vulnerable, feathers or no. They are especially vulnerable with inconsistent cutting: Some princess cuts have different chevroning in different quadrants which can make for a difficult setting process.

In addition to cut precision I have become a huge fan of cutters who chamfer their princess cuts. This is the practice of adding a tiny facet on the point of each corner for added protection. The AGS has welcomed this practice which is nice because those chamfers are undetectable but increase durability.
Interesting. I haven''t heard of this before, but it makes good sense.
 
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