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Face Masks and other strategies to help slow Covid-19 spread

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Heat is very effective at sanitizing and disinfecting objects from coronavirus. In fact, the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 may be even more sensitive to heat than the earlier SARS-CoV virus. Experiments done in China in 2002 with SARS-CoV in culture medium (Duan, Biomed Env Sci 2003) showed that it became undetectable after 30 minutes when heated to a temperature of 167°F, but recent tests with SARS-CoV-2 in Hong Kong showed that it became undetectable after just five minutesat only 158°F (70°C). The time required to kill SARS-CoV-2 increased as the temperature was reduced, such that the time by which it was undetectable increased to 30 minutes at 132°F (56°C), two days at 98.6°F (37°C), and two weeks at 71.6°F (22°C). At 39°F (4°C) the virus remained detectable at two weeks when the experiment ended (Chin, Lancet 2020).

This suggests, for example, that if you purchase take-out food and wish to disinfect the container itself of coronavirus (as well as keep your food warm), you can simply place the container in a warm oven or warming drawer for a period of time, such as at 150°F (65°C) for 60 minutes (giving it ample time to heat up) to disinfect it. Just be sure it is not directly exposed to a heating element so as not to pose a fire hazard. Most plastic and paper containers are stable for short periods at this temperature.

Theoretically, heating a face mask this way may also disinfect it. Moist heat may be better than dry heat, so, if done in an oven, placing a pan of water in the oven may be best. A study by researchers at Stanford University found that heating N95 masks (known as respirators) at 167°F (75°C) for 30 minutes (at 85% relative humidity) did not compromise the masks, even after 20 cycles — although these researchers have subsequently cautioned that contaminated masks should not be brought into homes.

You should not soak N95 or surgical masks in disinfectants or other liquids as this can compromise their integrity and fit.

Note that washing cloth face masks in a washing machine should suffice to disinfect them, according to the CDC. The agency also cautions not to touch your eyes, nose, and mouth when removing cloth coverings, and to and wash hands immediately after removing.

Coronavirus lasts longer on certain surfaces, particularly surgical masks!

The Hong Kong researchers noted above also placed a small amount of the SARS-CoV-2 on a variety of surfaces at room temperature (at 65% relative humidity) to see how long the virus would last before becoming undetectable. On tissue and regular paper it became undetectable within just 3 hours. On cloth and on paper money, it lasted 2 days. Surprisingly and disturbingly, it lasted longest on the outer layer of a surgical mask: Virus was detectable on the mask at day 7 (although at only 0.1% of its original level), which was also how long it lasted on plastic and stainless steel.

Don't directly refrigerate or freeze — it keeps the virus infectious

Studies with coronaviruses noted above and by others (Kampf, J Hosp Infect 2020) indicate that cold temperatures help preserve it and keep it infectious. Consequently, you should not place a recently purchased food container directly into a refrigerator or freezer and you should not "quarantine" a recently received package in a cold cellar or cold garage, as this will preserve coronavirus and could keep it infectious for days. Freezing can preserve coronavirus for years (WHO, COVID-19 Situation Report 32, 2020).

How effective are disinfectants against coronavirus?

The Hong Kong researchers also showed that common disinfectants were effective in killing SARS-CoV-2. The virus was undetectable after 5 minutes of exposure to household bleach (at a concentration of 1:49 or 1:99), ethanol (70%), povidone-iodine (7.5%), chloroxylenol (0.05%), chlorhexidine (0.05%) and benzalkonium chloride (0.1%). Fifteen minutes were required for the virus to be undetectable when exposed to a hand soap solution. The researchers only checked at 5 and 15 minutes, so it is possible that less time is necessary, but as we don't know the minimum time for disinfection, it would seem prudent to allow disinfectants a few minutes on surfaces before wiping them off.
 

Arcadian

Ideal_Rock
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Every time someone remove their mask they should wash face and hand. (wash hands first, obvs. then the face) fact of the matter is I saw some kid eating chips from a bag with gloves on, which probably touched I don't know how many other surfaces.... :oops2: :sick:

And then you have the complainers (not the first responders) who are like "this mask is tight" well numbskull, its supposed to be?

Its been a day.
 

1ofakind

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For my fabric face masks with wires to shape around the nose I am doing a 15-30 minute soak with detergent and boiling water. Light agitation when the water is cool enough to do so. The boiling water is probably overkill as is the ironing once it's dry but it sure doesn't hurt.
 

missy

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Every time someone remove their mask they should wash face and hand. (wash hands first, obvs. then the face) fact of the matter is I saw some kid eating chips from a bag with gloves on, which probably touched I don't know how many other surfaces.... :oops2: :sick:

And then you have the complainers (not the first responders) who are like "this mask is tight" well numbskull, its supposed to be?

Its been a day.
Yes for sure. We should wash our hands before we remove the mask and then wash our hands right after we remove the mask. Because the mask might contaminated.

And yes keep it tight. When I remove my mask my face has the imprint of it and since I am old it lasts for a long while. And that is OK. If it helps us stay safe it is worth a little imprint for sure.
 

missy

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For my fabric face masks with wires to shape around the nose I am doing a 15-30 minute soak with detergent and boiling water. Light agitation when the water is cool enough to do so. The boiling water is probably overkill as is the ironing once it's dry but it sure doesn't hurt.
If you read the link above you can see it's not too hard to disinfect fabric masks. And I agree better overkill than underkill.
 

Arcadian

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For my fabric face masks with wires to shape around the nose I am doing a 15-30 minute soak with detergent and boiling water. Light agitation when the water is cool enough to do so. The boiling water is probably overkill as is the ironing once it's dry but it sure doesn't hurt.
Yeah its overkill...lol but so what? ;-) But I'm also that one that adds a cap of bleach to the dishwasher too...:lol: Habit from being on well water.

Most municipal water shouldn't have much issue, well water....that can be another story.

Today I have to go to Joann's because I lost my stupid seam ripper. I've had this thing over 10 years and turned the house upside down looking for it yesterday....
 

1ofakind

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@Arcadian Oh if only our Joann or Hobby Lobby was open!!! We are scrambling to get materials for homemade face masks because although they are highly recommended the fabric stores are deemed non-essential. The interfacing ran out pretty early on. I’m now using clothesline cord for ties because I’m out of ribbon and elastic and I’ll just be honest....I really hate making bias tape and will avoid at all cost. Fortunately I had a brand new cotton duvet cover that is making a lot of masks but I don’t really want to cut up hubby’s t-shirts or used pillow cases to make masks for people. :eek-2: Other than that I mostly have upholstery fabric and that’s not very suitable...and a brand new set of really nice sheets but I hope it doesn’t come to that.
 

Arcadian

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@Arcadian Oh if only our Joann or Hobby Lobby was open!!! We are scrambling to get materials for homemade face masks because although they are highly recommended the fabric stores are deemed non-essential. The interfacing ran out pretty early on. I’m now using clothesline cord for ties because I’m out of ribbon and elastic and I’ll just be honest....I really hate making bias tape and will avoid at all cost. Fortunately I had a brand new cotton duvet cover that is making a lot of masks but I don’t really want to cut up hubby’s t-shirts or used pillow cases to make masks for people. :eek-2: Other than that I mostly have upholstery fabric and that’s not very suitable...and a brand new set of really nice sheets but I hope it doesn’t come to that.
I will never feel bias tape is "too expensive" ever again. It takes SOOOOLOOOOOONG to make. I tried to do the snip and rip method and that was a very bad idea. I'm making bias tape for every 10 N95 covers I have to sew...painful!!

My last order from Joanns...half of it was cancelled. :oops2: the half that I needed to make the bias tape with!! Be glad you don't have one open, may as well not be open. Here, they allow 15 people in the store at a time I went right at open and the line was...ridiculous...

And if you order online to pick up in store, most of what you order is gone. The store literally was out of decent shears and I couldn't get a rotary wheel replacement. Pretty much what they had are the ones that nobody wants but Fiskar's keeps putting out for some unknown reason.


But there's a few local fabric stores here which are local; one is closed, the other by appt only (they have good fabric though its a def. on the expensive side). They have the navy blue that I need so will keep the appt.... The other I called a few times and they never called back. They're open though. Might be business only.

The place where I ordered my replacement machine said they've seen a huge bump in people who have never sewed before buying machines. Even my nieces who have never sewed ever are now interested. amazing what a pandemic will do.

I still have some elastic spool but not for long...and looks like I won't be able to find any for a very long time either.
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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@missy, can you summarize? The article is behind a paywall.
Sure. Here you go. HTH.


By
Hilary Potkewitz
Updated April 2, 2020 10:02 pm

If you or a family member gets infected with the coronavirus, it is very likely that you’ll have to ride it out at home.
Most Covid-19 cases don’t require hospitalization, and as intensive-care beds fill, all but the most critical cases are being sent home. So, people should be prepared to care for themselves or their loved ones under their own roof—and that means having the right supplies to nurse the ill patient and keep the rest of the family healthy.
We asked doctors at top hospitals all over the country what they would include in their ideal Covid-19 home-care kit. We gathered their best suggestions and advice to help you organize your own.



Safety and cleaning
Isolation and cleaning supplies: bleach; face masks that cover nose and mouth (surgical masks, home-improvement masks or scarfs); gloves for entering sick room and doing laundry (latex or nitrile rubber); hand sanitizer; laundry detergent (wash everything on hot); nail brush; paper towels; soap; tissues.

The first task is to isolate patients with their own stash of tissues, disinfecting wipes, paper towels, soap and warm water.
“At the top of my wish list would be an extra bedroom with an attached bathroom. That’s the ideal scenario,” says David Buchholz, senior medical director at Columbia University Irving Medical Center. Most people don’t have that luxury, but it is worth disrupting the rest of the household to try. “If you have a one-bedroom apartment, the sick person gets the bedroom. That’s key. They can’t leave, and nobody can enter. Not even pets,” Dr. Buchholz says.
Another key piece of equipment: masks. Patients should wear a face mask anytime they leave their room, and these excursions should be limited—in other words, bathroom trips only. Anyone entering the room should also wear a mask, and the sick person should likewise mask up for all visitors, regardless of age.


A simple surgical mask is recommended for home use, but given shortages, you can improvise with a scarf tied securely around the face, says Dr. Buchholz. Even hardware-store face masks used for projects like painting or sanding are better than going barefaced. The point is to keep the nose and mouth well-covered, because “if the sick person has a surprising cough or sneeze, you may not be able to turn away fast enough,” he says. Glasses are helpful for keeping spray droplets out of the eyes.

Tying a bandanna over the face outlaw-style isn’t ideal because it will gape at the chin, says Audrey Chun, a doctor in geriatrics and palliative medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. “You want the mask to catch the particles from a sneeze, so it’s not spewing out the sides or the bottom,” she says.


You’ll also need gloves—rubber or latex—when you enter the sickroom or when you clean. Stock up on cleaning supplies, because everything the sick person touches—like cutlery, doorknobs or the bathroom sink—must be cleaned. You can make a DIY bleach preparation by diluting five tablespoons of bleach per gallon of water. Regular hand soap is crucial, too.

“I cannot emphasize enough the importance of hand hygiene: washing your hands with warm, soapy water and wiping down surfaces that have been touched. We know this works,” Dr. Chun says. She recommends a nail brush to scrub under fingernails.

If the bathroom is shared, sick people should use disposable paper towels instead of a shared hand towel, Dr. Buchholz says. Keep their bath towels separate from everyone else’s. And healthy family members should remove their toiletries from the shared space. “You don’t want toothbrushes to be anywhere near each other,” he says.

Medicine
Medical supplies: cough drops; over-the-counter cold medicines; pulse oximeter and batteries (there is a pulse-oximeter app available for the iPhone, but none of the doctors we spoke to recommended it); saline nasal spray; thermometer; Tylenol/acetaminophen (children’s or infant’s versions if applicable).

Anyone who falls ill should keep in contact with their doctor and let them know if symptoms worsen. To that end, a thermometer is helpful. Since Covid-19 can affect breathing, several doctors also recommended obtaining an at-home pulse oximeter: a device that clips onto the finger and measures heart rate and blood oxygen levels, which are important indicators of how well the lungs are functioning, says Andra Blomkalns, chair of emergency medicine at Stanford School of Medicine. “I ordered 600 of them to send home with patients, and I’m glad I did.” Oximeters are sold over the counter at pharmacies and retailers.


“For a really sick person who’s not sick enough to be admitted to the hospital but they’re on the edge, having an oximeter can be incredibly reassuring,” Dr. Buchholz says.

Have your regular cold medicines on hand and Tylenol or acetaminophen. If the patient is under 18, make sure you have children’s or infant’s versions.

“For the vast majority of kids, you can just stick to the items you would normally use for influenza or other respiratory ailments,” says Danielle Zerr, chief of pediatric infectious diseases at Seattle Children’s Hospital. It is difficult to get children to wear a face mask, so the caregiver must wear one at all times when interacting with the sick child, she says. The child’s Covid-19 symptoms may be mild, but “it’s the same virus, and it’ll be much worse in an adult,” she says.

For a dry cough, throat lozenges can be helpful, as long as the child is old enough not to choke on them. For younger children, “if they have throat pain, a little bit of warm tea with honey is a nice way to go,” Dr. Zerr says.

Food and drink
Nutrition supplies: chicken soup; daily multivitamin and vitamin C tablets; electrolyte-replacement drinks (if using sports drinks, cut in half with water); fresh ginger, lemons, dill, fresh or dried oregano; high-calorie, nutrient-rich foods like avocados; honey for throat soothing; pectin-rich foods like bananas and apples.

As with any flulike virus, it is important that the patient drink plenty of fluids. Occasionally, Covid-19 can cause gastrointestinal distress and diarrhea, and replenishing fluids in those cases is especially important, as dehydration can worsen a fever, Dr. Blomkalns says. Electrolyte-replacement drinks are recommended, but popular sports drinks like Gatorade tend to have high amounts of sugar, so they should be cut in half with water for both children and adults, she says.


Another reason to cut sports drinks with water is that sugar can make diarrhea worse. Sugar-free beverages with artificial sweetener aren’t recommended either, because that, too, can worsen gastrointestinal problems, Dr. Chun says. She recommends pectin-rich foods like bananas and apples to ease symptoms of diarrhea.

Some patients tend to lose their appetite when sick, especially children, so Dr. Zerr recommends having on hand comforting, high-calorie but nutrient-dense foods like apple sauce and avocados.

A couple of doctors recommended a daily multivitamin and vitamin C tablets. “And never underestimate the power of chicken soup,” says Mark Hyman, head of innovation at the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine. “Protein is very important when fighting viral illnesses.”

He recommends adding dill, oregano and ginger to soups for their antiviral properties. One of Dr. Hyman’s favorite home remedies is his “cold-buster tea”: a 2-inch chunk of fresh ginger root, sliced thin, boiled in a pot of water for several minutes. Add fresh lemon juice, honey and cayenne pepper. Steep for five minutes. “It becomes this spicy, sweet and tangy thing,” he says. “It’s great.”

Ms. Potkewitz is a writer in New York. She can be reached at [email protected].”
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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If you aren't a gamer you probably don't know what this is (Mortal Kombat). Our neighbor 3D printed these for us, a filter goes in the front inside so we are using the furnace filters we bought.



IMG_8214.JPG

IMG_8216.JPG
Love it @StephanieLynn!

We wore our new KN95 masks today for a short walk. Eh. Not thrilled with it. The ones my DH made us fit much better.


kn95masks.png
 

Arcadian

Ideal_Rock
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Excuse my mess....lol

Over the last week I've made about 156 masks for various organizations. A box of 50 went to Japan for the marines there. (they had nothing) Send another 45 to Navajo nation, but they need many many more. Sent another 30 to nursing home, and gave some to neighbors (hey if they're protected so am I)

I have 65 that have been cut and are being worked on today. (they're in various states of done). Then I'll be back to the mostly plain military ones. I think I may do some butterfly ones next to break it up.

20200419_182415.jpg
20200419_180632.jpg
20200425_162421.jpg

These ones are straight OLSEN masks that I've added a deeper curve to make it fit nicely under the chin, so I don't have to worry about trying to put in a pleat. Filter pocket goes edge to edge on these which is why they're so loved in healthcare. Easy to sew if you can make your own shortcuts.

I've only cut myself a few times and put a needle through tip of a nail...lol! But I haven't broken any needles *knock on wood*.
 

canuk-gal

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Apr 19, 2004
Messages
20,544
Excuse my mess....lol

Over the last week I've made about 156 masks for various organizations. A box of 50 went to Japan for the marines there. (they had nothing) Send another 45 to Navajo nation, but they need many many more. Sent another 30 to nursing home, and gave some to neighbors (hey if they're protected so am I)

I have 65 that have been cut and are being worked on today. (they're in various states of done). Then I'll be back to the mostly plain military ones. I think I may do some butterfly ones next to break it up.

20200419_182415.jpg
20200419_180632.jpg
20200425_162421.jpg

These ones are straight OLSEN masks that I've added a deeper curve to make it fit nicely under the chin, so I don't have to worry about trying to put in a pleat. Filter pocket goes edge to edge on these which is why they're so loved in healthcare. Easy to sew if you can make your own shortcuts.

I've only cut myself a few times and put a needle through tip of a nail...lol! But I haven't broken any needles *knock on wood*.
:appl::appl::appl:FABU!!!!
 

JPie

Ideal_Rock
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Someone needs to get this and report back!

 

Arcadian

Ideal_Rock
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@Arcadian - you are an amazing woman! Thank you for being caring and helping those in need. :appl:
Its basically time I put that expensive ass sewing machine to good use..lol Certainly there is a huge need, that I wish wasn't there! Ideally we would have had our act together in this country for PPE. #butyouknowwherethatgoesright....
 

partgypsy

Ideal_Rock
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Wow those masks look great! Both attractive and functional. I bought a mask that arrived the other day, with the folds and also a pocket for a "filter" (in my case a shop cloth). but the pocket doesn't go edge to edge like yours does. That said before I got my mask I was using a scarf so it's definitely an improvement!
 

kipari

Ideal_Rock
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Jan 9, 2015
Messages
2,032
Excuse my mess....lol

Over the last week I've made about 156 masks for various organizations. A box of 50 went to Japan for the marines there. (they had nothing) Send another 45 to Navajo nation, but they need many many more. Sent another 30 to nursing home, and gave some to neighbors (hey if they're protected so am I)

I have 65 that have been cut and are being worked on today. (they're in various states of done). Then I'll be back to the mostly plain military ones. I think I may do some butterfly ones next to break it up.

20200419_182415.jpg
20200419_180632.jpg
20200425_162421.jpg

These ones are straight OLSEN masks that I've added a deeper curve to make it fit nicely under the chin, so I don't have to worry about trying to put in a pleat. Filter pocket goes edge to edge on these which is why they're so loved in healthcare. Easy to sew if you can make your own shortcuts.

I've only cut myself a few times and put a needle through tip of a nail...lol! But I haven't broken any needles *knock on wood*.
@Arcadian chapeau!!!
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
33,799
Excuse my mess....lol

Over the last week I've made about 156 masks for various organizations. A box of 50 went to Japan for the marines there. (they had nothing) Send another 45 to Navajo nation, but they need many many more. Sent another 30 to nursing home, and gave some to neighbors (hey if they're protected so am I)

I have 65 that have been cut and are being worked on today. (they're in various states of done). Then I'll be back to the mostly plain military ones. I think I may do some butterfly ones next to break it up.

20200419_182415.jpg
20200419_180632.jpg
20200425_162421.jpg

These ones are straight OLSEN masks that I've added a deeper curve to make it fit nicely under the chin, so I don't have to worry about trying to put in a pleat. Filter pocket goes edge to edge on these which is why they're so loved in healthcare. Easy to sew if you can make your own shortcuts.

I've only cut myself a few times and put a needle through tip of a nail...lol! But I haven't broken any needles *knock on wood*.
@Arcadian I am in awe of you and your spectacular work. Thank you for all you are doing. You are a hero. Lots of behind the lines heroes and you are one of them.

How is your brother doing? Continuing good thoughts for him and your entire family.
Hugs.
 

Arcadian

Ideal_Rock
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@Arcadian I am in awe of you and your spectacular work. Thank you for all you are doing. You are a hero. Lots of behind the lines heroes and you are one of them.

How is your brother doing? Continuing good thoughts for him and your entire family.
Hugs.
My folks get a daily update which they filter out to us. Infection reached the blood but that was expected. No surgery we're hoping as he's responding to treatment. Its unfortunate that its the same leg however (just different spot)

Hero I'm not being that I'm just sitting in my house. My sewing is self serving (trying to get into heaven...lol :cool2::lol:) Seriously though, I do it because it has to be done and corona ain't getting me :lol: . So it gives me something to keep me from having anxiety attacks, use a tool I paid ridiculous money for, and fill a gap where its severely needed.

One of my cousins is an OK Statie and the stuff he's said on facebook...whoosa. Imagine the craziest stuff ever, then add an extra dose of crazy, thats whats out there. The real heros are dealing with that. That includes delivery folks, grocery store, fire, police, emt's, medical/hospital personnel.
 

missy

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My folks get a daily update which they filter out to us. Infection reached the blood but that was expected. No surgery we're hoping as he's responding to treatment. Its unfortunate that its the same leg however (just different spot)

Hero I'm not being that I'm just sitting in my house. My sewing is self serving (trying to get into heaven...lol :cool2::lol:) Seriously though, I do it because it has to be done and corona ain't getting me :lol: . So it gives me something to keep me from having anxiety attacks, use a tool I paid ridiculous money for, and fill a gap where its severely needed.

One of my cousins is an OK Statie and the stuff he's said on facebook...whoosa. Imagine the craziest stuff ever, then add an extra dose of crazy, thats whats out there. The real heros are dealing with that. That includes delivery folks, grocery store, fire, police, emt's, medical/hospital personnel.
Heroes come in all forms and in my book you’re just that. A hero. I hear you re doing something helps the anxiety. Same. What we control we control and what we can’t we accept.

Glad he’s responding to treatment. Keeping your brother in my thoughts and prayers and hoping he makes a complete recovery.
 

kipari

Ideal_Rock
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I'm with @missy , @Arcadian !!

People like you make this world a better place ❤






I just received masks from my second sister ( oldest friend,have known each other since preschool) .
She made cheerful masks for all family members according to style preferences. So so touching. And tell kids actually look forward to wearing masks now! We have polka dots, ponies (of course) , flowers, stars and tartan /solid White for the guys... Woot
 

missy

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Arcadian

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I forgot to share this. FYI. For a tighter seal this is an option. Interesting.

I saw this and chuckled. Its already hot in FL, I don't exactly see anyone wanting to do this. though you never know.......

Skin safe double sided tape is enough to add quite a tight seal without resorting to looking like someone trying to rob a bank.
 

1ofakind

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Aug 22, 2012
Messages
500
I saw this and chuckled. Its already hot in FL, I don't exactly see anyone wanting to do this. though you never know.......

Skin safe double sided tape is enough to add quite a tight seal without resorting to looking like someone trying to rob a bank.
Pantyhose could be used for stretchy tie straps or ear loops though. I just can’t remember when I last saw a pair.
 

Arcadian

Ideal_Rock
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Pantyhose could be used for stretchy tie straps or ear loops though. I just can’t remember when I last saw a pair.
I can't remember the last time I even WORE a pair!

But some I've seen are using them for ear loops, which I can see how they'd work in a pinch if you have nothing else. but over the face and mouth? LOL thats bankrobber stuff... Down here, nobody will want to let you in with that going on....
 

1ofakind

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I can't remember the last time I even WORE a pair!

But some I've seen are using them for ear loops, which I can see how they'd work in a pinch if you have nothing else. but over the face and mouth? LOL thats bankrobber stuff... Down here, nobody will want to let you in with that going on....
Tights in winter yes...but straight up panty hose....I was thinking 20-25 years ago...but then I lived in South TX so definitely not, lol.

Oh and we are in a pinch here. I can‘t get elastic, stretchy hair bands, nothing...I’m having people donate thread because I can‘t get any and am running out. I was just at Walmart and I think by the end of the day they will be out of fabric completely. Nothing else is open. If pantyhose would work I would use them for masks at this point...it‘s shockingly hard to find masks or mask making materials here and by Friday there is a mandate. o_O
 
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