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ENGAGEMENT RING APPRAISAL WRONG?? NEED HELP PLEASE!!!

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likamarie82

Rough_Rock
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Date: 2/5/2009 9:32:46 AM
Author: Noahsmom
You might want to rethink the insurance. What happens if one of the prongs breaks? or something happens with the setting and you lose the stone? Considering how old your diamond might be, it is going to be harder to replace if you lose it. Having insurance will at least help put some kind of money down to help find a replacement instead of paying 100% out of pocket for a new ring or stone.
You''re right, I would be so upset with myself if something happend like that:)
 

suchende

Brilliant_Rock
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33.gif
Looks like a round brilliant to me... waiting for someone more knowledgeable to chime in!
 

snickers1101

Rough_Rock
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Jan 20, 2009
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I work in the insurance indsutry so I can give you a little insight to appraisals. Appraisers will always give some "cushion" to the value of your jewelry. Let''s say you have an $8000 diamond and have it insured for that amount (which you can do based on the bill of sale). Yet the appraisal says $10,000. If you lose that diamond, the insurance company will give you $8000 or try to replace the diamond with a similar one for $8000 and not a dime more. You may not be able to find the same cut, quality, etc for that price. If you insure it for $10,000, you''re more likely to find the same type of diamond to replace it with and possibly upgrade, too. Also, it''s best to get an appraisal from the store you buy it from. If you go to another jeweler, they may appraise it for what they would sell it for instead of putting an actual value on the item. I would always recommend insuring jewelry at the appraised value. Hope this didn''t sound too confusing.
 

Todd Gray

Brilliant_Rock
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Date: 2/4/2009 7:54:05 PM
Author:likamarie82
The Appraisal read:

One ladies, 18Kt yellow gold, Euro shank, engagement ring weighing approximately about 5.36 dwt,with one round white stone in the center set in a white gold, bar setting and a channel set row of four round, white stones on each side. It contains:

One round, brilliant cut diamond measuring approximately 5.62mm in diameter by 3.6mm in depth and weighs about .72 carats. It color grade is in the J-L range and clarity grade SI1...........$3110.00

Eight round, brilliant cut diamonds measuring from approximately 2.2mm to 2.5mm each in diameter and weight a total of about .40 carats. Their color grades are in the G-I range and average clarity grade os SI1...........$810.00

Mounting............$930.00
Estimated Replacement Cost: 4850.00

I did some research online and you can see the shape of my diamond perfectly because of the setting and its ideally cut...

Hello Likeamarie,

I realize you''re new to diamonds and thus aren''t familiar with the correct use of terms like "ideal cut" but I''d like to correct the use of the term "ideal cut" in relationship to this discussion to avoid the possible confusion of its meaning by other people likely to read this thread. The term "ideal cut" refers to diamonds cut to a precise range of proportions as determined by the combination of total depth, table diameter, crown angle, pavilion angle, girdle thickness, culet size and resulting visual performance (by AGS standards). There is no way to know whether your diamonds is "ideal cut" or not because the appraiser evaluated the diamond while it was mounted and thus the proportions of the diamond were not measured - if they were the appraisal would indicate the appropriate measurements as stated above. It is common for retail jewelers to refer to round brilliant cut diamonds as "ideal cut" however this reference is incorrect unless data is available to support the statement. Again, I''m not "correcting you" but want to reference the correct use of the term "ideal cut" to avoid confusion by other people reading this thread.

The diamond pictured looks like a modern round brilliant cut diamond, but it can be difficult to ascertain from a picture due to focus and lighting. A diffused picture would be helpful. However the appraiser did not describe the diamond as an Old European, Mine Cut or Rose Cut so it is unlikely that it is a cut earlier than the 1950''s which is the transitional period. This is something however that your appraiser should be willing to determine for you and should be able to do so with relative ease.
 

likamarie82

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Date: 2/5/2009 2:40:21 PM
Author: Todd Gray

Date: 2/4/2009 7:54:05 PM
Author:likamarie82
The Appraisal read:

One ladies, 18Kt yellow gold, Euro shank, engagement ring weighing approximately about 5.36 dwt,with one round white stone in the center set in a white gold, bar setting and a channel set row of four round, white stones on each side. It contains:

One round, brilliant cut diamond measuring approximately 5.62mm in diameter by 3.6mm in depth and weighs about .72 carats. It color grade is in the J-L range and clarity grade SI1...........$3110.00

Eight round, brilliant cut diamonds measuring from approximately 2.2mm to 2.5mm each in diameter and weight a total of about .40 carats. Their color grades are in the G-I range and average clarity grade os SI1...........$810.00

Mounting............$930.00
Estimated Replacement Cost: 4850.00

I did some research online and you can see the shape of my diamond perfectly because of the setting and its ideally cut...

Hello Likeamarie,

I realize you''re new to diamonds and thus aren''t familiar with the correct use of terms like ''ideal cut'' but I''d like to correct the use of the term ''ideal cut'' in relationship to this discussion to avoid the possible confusion of its meaning by other people likely to read this thread. The term ''ideal cut'' refers to diamonds cut to a precise range of proportions as determined by the combination of total depth, table diameter, crown angle, pavilion angle, girdle thickness, culet size and resulting visual performance (by AGS standards). There is no way to know whether your diamonds is ''ideal cut'' or not because the appraiser evaluated the diamond while it was mounted and thus the proportions of the diamond were not measured - if they were the appraisal would indicate the appropriate measurements as stated above. It is common for retail jewelers to refer to round brilliant cut diamonds as ''ideal cut'' however this reference is incorrect unless data is available to support the statement. Again, I''m not ''correcting you'' but want to reference the correct use of the term ''ideal cut'' to avoid confusion by other people reading this thread.

The diamond pictured looks like a modern round brilliant cut diamond, but it can be difficult to ascertain from a picture due to focus and lighting. A diffused picture would be helpful. However the appraiser did not describe the diamond as an Old European, Mine Cut or Rose Cut so it is unlikely that it is a cut earlier than the 1950''s which is the transitional period. This is something however that your appraiser should be willing to determine for you and should be able to do so with relative ease.

I didnt know that! Thats for the info!! Well, do you think I should send it off to get the actual measurements? Do they do that? Just wondering.. like I said, I really dont know much about them but I am learning alot of this site!! Thanks again!
 

strmrdr

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Nov 1, 2003
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23,295
Cant tell from the pictures what kind of cut it is.
It does look crown heavy which might support it being an older cut but I don''t see an open culet so not to old.
 

Dancing Fire

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Date: 2/4/2009 8:36:12 PM
Author: likamarie82
Thanks!! How would anyone know how old a stone is? Do they have testing for tha? Just curious:)
a billion yrs old.
2.gif
 

LGK

Ideal_Rock
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2,975
Yeah, it isn''t easy to tell from your pics (it is amazing how pesky a ring can be to photograph!) but I''d guess round brilliant, rather than an antique cut, if I had to guess. It just doesn''t look like it has the chunkier facets of an old european cut or transitional cut. If it is a round brilliant cut, then the mid forties would pretty much be the earliest it would be likely to date to, with 1950s through now being more likely.

You can ask your appraiser about the cut. He should be able to tell you if it''s an older cut stone immediately, and more than likely would have noted it on the appraisal.

If you are not going to insure, you probably don''t need a new appraisal. Yeah, it seems incredibly high to me, so you wouldn''t want to overpay so much for an insurance premium. I''d strongly suggest insuring it; Jewelers Mutual is not that pricey and is very, very easy to set up. Diamonds are breakable, contrary to what a lot of people think. They''re incredibly hard to scratch, but they will chip and/or break if smacked the wrong way, and your stone is set high and very exposed in that setting.
 

likamarie82

Rough_Rock
Joined
Feb 4, 2009
Messages
39
Date: 2/5/2009 11:39:15 PM
Author: LittleGreyKitten
Yeah, it isn''t easy to tell from your pics (it is amazing how pesky a ring can be to photograph!) but I''d guess round brilliant, rather than an antique cut, if I had to guess. It just doesn''t look like it has the chunkier facets of an old european cut or transitional cut. If it is a round brilliant cut, then the mid forties would pretty much be the earliest it would be likely to date to, with 1950s through now being more likely.

You can ask your appraiser about the cut. He should be able to tell you if it''s an older cut stone immediately, and more than likely would have noted it on the appraisal.

If you are not going to insure, you probably don''t need a new appraisal. Yeah, it seems incredibly high to me, so you wouldn''t want to overpay so much for an insurance premium. I''d strongly suggest insuring it; Jewelers Mutual is not that pricey and is very, very easy to set up. Diamonds are breakable, contrary to what a lot of people think. They''re incredibly hard to scratch, but they will chip and/or break if smacked the wrong way, and your stone is set high and very exposed in that setting.

Thanks, I think I should, I will check out Jewelers Mutual :)
 

swimmer

Ideal_Rock
Joined
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Messages
2,516
Date: 2/5/2009 6:20:28 PM
Author: Dancing Fire
Date: 2/4/2009 8:36:12 PM

Author: likamarie82

Thanks!! How would anyone know how old a stone is? Do they have testing for tha? Just curious:)
a billion yrs old.
2.gif

Painfully I have to admit to thinking exactly the same thing as Dancing Fire.
Good luck with your insurance issues likamarie!
 

likamarie82

Rough_Rock
Joined
Feb 4, 2009
Messages
39
Just wondering... what is the difference between eye clean and mind clean?? I am really clueless.. thanks
 

Noahsmom

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jan 20, 2009
Messages
228
Think about it...seriously.

Eye clean-you don''t see any inclusions or marks with the naked eye. Mind clean-knowing that the stone does not have any inclusions/imperfections. Just because you cant see it, doesn''t mean it''s not there.
 
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