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What are the best cut for short fingers size 7?

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lewsbox

Rough_Rock
Joined
Sep 25, 2002
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1
I have learned much since reading this forum-
I do have a question however. What is a flattering cut for a woman with a size 7 finger. Her fingers are short in nature but not stubby. She’s a tennis player and golfer so depending on how much she plays the hand looks a little different.:confused:
 

caltron

Rough_Rock
Joined
Sep 8, 2002
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13
A marquise diamond can make her hands and fingers look more elongated, if that's the look she's going for. Good luck!
 

fire&ice

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jul 22, 2002
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7,828
As one who has shorter fingers & is a tennis player w/ a ring size a tad smaller than 6, the best proportions for me is an RB w/ tapered baguettes on the side. It's an optical illusion - it makes your fingers look longer by pulling attention to the sides of the fingers.

Actually, I have an estate ring that is longer & not as wide. It is not flattering on my hand - I wear it only because it's so beautiful.
 

caltron

Rough_Rock
Joined
Sep 8, 2002
Messages
13
Also, this article at [*]http://www.diamondexpert.com/articles/fancy.html seems helpful. In a nutshell: Stay away from square diamonds; You can't go wrong with a round; and rectangular diamonds will add the appearance of length.

SHAPES

ROUND - Information for the round brilliant has been described on this site in detail under the topics of the 4C's. The round brilliant diamond, being by far the most popular diamond shape is, because of market forces, the most expensive. Rounds make up the vast majority of diamonds found in engagement rings, and are also popular as stud earrings and pendants. You just can't go wrong with a round!

MARQUISE - The marquise (pronounced "mar-KEYS", not "mar-KEY") is usually cut as an adaptation of the 58-facet standard brilliant, with the crown having 33 facets and the pavilion 25 facets of the same type as the round brilliant. However, the pavilion can be cut with either 4, 6 or 8 pavilion mains facets, depending upon the stone's girdle outline. These modifications are also seen in the pavilion cuts for the pear, oval and heart shaped diamonds.

The crown cut is also sometimes modified in the marquise to form what is called a "French tip", where the bezel facet at the point of the stone is eliminated. As an example for comparison, below is a diagram showing what an imaginary hybrid-cut marquise would look like where the upper half of the stone is cut as a French tip and the lower half is cut as a standard brilliant. Note how the elimination of the bezel facet at the point of the stone requires that the adjoining bezel facets become "stretched" to accommodate the space left. French tips are also sometimes cut in pear and heart shaped diamonds.



The length-to-width ratio is important to a stone's appearance, and for the marquise shape the preferred range is 1.75-2.25: 1.00. Marquise diamonds frequently show a bow tie, so try to find a stone in which this is minimal or absent. This shape of diamond in a ring accentuates the length of the fingers.

As a % of the diamond's width, the better cut marquise will have table % in the range of 53-63% and total depth % (crown+girdle+pavilion) of about 58-65%.

The cost of a 1ct., D, IF marquise is about 20% less than that of an identical round diamond. For a 1ct., G, VS2 stone, the marquise cut is only about 7% cheaper than the same round diamond.

PEAR - The pear shape, like the marquise, usually has the 58 facet brilliant pattern, but can also be cut with different numbers of pavilion mains of 8,7,6 or 4 facets.

In a pear, look for a well-shaped head and even shoulders with an optimal length-to-width range of 1.50-1.75:1.00. This shape in a ring will make the fingers appear longer. Pear-shaped diamonds work equally well as pendants and are exceptional as drop earrings.

Ranges for the well cut pears for table % and total depth % are about 53-63% and 58-65%, respectively.

The relative cost of a 1ct., D, IF pear shaped diamond is roughly 25% less than an identical round stone, but a 1ct., G, VS2 pear is only 20% less than the cost of an identical round.

OVAL - The oval, as with the above examples, is seen most frequently cut in the standard 58 facet brilliant pattern, but again can have a varying number of pavilion mains facets ranging from 4, 6 or 8.

For ovals, look for even, well-rounded ends with a full body having an optimal length-to-width range of 1.33-1.66: 1.00. This shape of stone in a ring accents finger length, and also works nicely as stud earrings.

Higher cut quality ovals, as with the marquise and pear, have table %'s of about 53- 63% and total depth %'s of 58-65%.

The relative cost of an oval diamond of 1ct., D color and IF clarity is roughly 25% less than an identical round stone, but a 1ct., G, VS2 oval is only 20% less than the cost of an identical round.

RADIANT - The radiant cut is a patented name and cut called a cut-cornered, square/rectangular (depending on the overall shape) modified brilliant on GIA grading reports. It has a total of 70 facets, there being 25 crown, 8 girdle and 37 pavilion facets. The truncated corners may aid in avoiding or minimizing possible chipping problems posed by extremely thin girdle widths in these areas of the stone.

Generally, a ring with a square cut radiant tends to shorten the appearance of the longer fingered hand.

Radiants of higher cut quality will have table %'s of about 59-69% and total depth %'s ranging from about 59-69%. Deep pavilions are often seen on many radiants and princess cuts and contribute to the increased total depth % seen in these stones. However, this extra depth is often necessary to bring out the maximum brilliance in the stone.

The comparative cost of a 1ct., D, IF radiant diamond is roughly 33% less than an identical round stone, but a 1ct., G, VS2 radiant is only about 20% less than the cost of an identical round.

PRINCESS - The princess cut is called a square/rectangular modified brilliant in GIA grading reports. It may have either 50 facets (21 crown, 4 girdle, 25 pavilion) or 58 facets (21 crown, 4 girdle, 33 pavilion), depending on how the pavilion is cut.

This cut of diamond is frequently a square shape and therefore shortens the appearance of the longer fingered hand. The princess cut has sharp, squared-off corners, and if the girdle is extremely thin in these areas, chipping or cracking may occur more easily.

Princess shapes of high cut quality usually have a table % in the range of roughly 60-75% and a total depth % of about 65-80%.

As with the radiant, the cost of a 1ct., D, IF princess diamond is roughly 33% less than that of an identical round stone, but a 1ct., G, VS2 princess is only about 20% less than the cost of an identical round.

EMERALD - The emerald cut is not a brilliant cut, but is called a step cut. Step cuts are comprised of larger, planar facets which act like mirrors. The emerald cut has 58 facets, with 25 crown, 8 girdle and 25 pavilion. Because of the angle, size and shape of the facets, the emerald cut shows less brilliance and fire (dispersion) than the other brilliant and modified brilliant cut diamonds. However, the emerald cut stone reveals a classic and aristocratic elegance and beauty not seen in other cuts.

Because of the open and large, plate-like nature of the facets, it is highly recommended that you consider staying at higher color (D-G) and clarity (IF-VS2) grades than you might with a brilliant cut stone because they are more likely to become visible at lower grades. Also, check to make sure that all the facet edges appear parallel in the face-up position. If they aren't, it can be pretty obvious at times.

The emerald cut offers a touch of regal elegance as the center stone in a ring, and the most attractive proportions are a length-to-width ratio range of 1.50-1.75:1.00. However, some prefer a more square look with a ratio in the range of 1.30:1.00. Obviously, the more square the shape, the more it compliments the longer-fingered hand, and the more rectangular, the better suited it is to the shorter-fingered hand.

The better emerald cut diamonds, like radiants, will have table %'s of about 59-69% and total depth %'s ranging from about 59-69%.

Like both the radiant and princess, the cost of a 1ct., D, IF emerald cut diamond is roughly 33% less than that of an identical round stone, but a 1ct., G, VS2 emerald is only about 20% less than the cost of an identical round.

HEART - The heart shape is a brilliant cut, which can also be modified so that the number of pavilion mains may be 6, 7 or 8.

In a heart cut it is important to look for a perfectly symmetrical appearance where the lobes (top arches) are of even height and breadth, and the overall shape pleasing.

The better cut heart shapes will have a length-to-width ratio of just about 1.00:1.00, with a little variation from about 0.98:1.00 to 1.02:1.00.

This shape is seen frequently in pendants, but is suitable for most any purpose.

The well-cut heart shaped diamonds will have a table % in the 53-63% range, and a total depth of about 58-65%.

Roughly comparable with the pear and oval shapes, the relative cost of a 1ct., D, IF, heart shaped diamond is approximately 25% less than an identical round stone, but a 1ct., G, VS heart is only about 20% less than the cost of an identical round diamond
 

fire&ice

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jul 22, 2002
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7,828
----------------
On 9/27/2002 5:06:05 PM

Also, this article at [*]http://www.diamondexpert.com/articles/fancy.html seems helpful. In a nutshell: Stay away from square diamonds; You can't go wrong with a round; and rectangular diamonds will add the appearance of length.

. This shape of diamond in a ring accentuates the length of the fingers.

----------------

Wow, that was informative. Thanks.

Marquise does accentuate the length of the fingers......when you have lovely long fingers. Unfortunately, I am not blessed w/ those great piano fingers. Marquise's or elongated rings accentuate my lack of length.
 

caltron

Rough_Rock
Joined
Sep 8, 2002
Messages
13
Well, I've always read that marquise diamonds do make short fingers appear longer. My aunt has short, chubby fingers, and in my opinion, the marquise diamond did make them look longer. It's the same principle in effect when women are told to wear vertical stripes to look thinner.

That's just the conventional wisdom. It doesn't mean it's true, but I happen to agree with it.
 

fire&ice

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jul 22, 2002
Messages
7,828
You could be right - especially given the "skinny" nature of marquise.

I'm just a RB kinda girl - not a big fan of any other cut.
 
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