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Unexpected job opportunity, I like current one but....

vintageinjune

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
427
Earlier this year, someone I had worked with gave my number to someone else in the industry when they were talking about how they were looking for someone to fill a position. They reached out to me and asked if I was interested in their position, but I replied that I was happy where I was at. Then they asked what it would take to make leaving worth my while.

I took a few days and wrote a several paragraphs long, detailed response, and they said they would keep me posted on if they could make that work. Months and months went by, peppered intermittently with them touching base with me just as I'd thought they'd given up and/or found someone else to fill the job. They always reached out to touch base with me, never I to them.

Last week, I was contacted and informed that they were excited to announce a position meeting my requirements was theirs to offer. I have working interviews set up and have already toured the office and had a chance to observe it for several hours and interview current employees.

The culture seems to match all my requirments (bonus: I personally know someone who worked there and had nothing but wonderful things to say about it, but also know people who have worked there who admit the place frequently runs late), during my tour I announced the need for some additional equipment and a couple small changes to standards that were not being met, fully expecting push back about spending that kind of money - yet to my delighted shock, I was thanked for informing them of the change in industry standards and told "this is why a new set of eyes is always good, they can see things you miss because you've been too close for too long and can learn something new".

I'm in my mid 30s, just started my current job barely more than a year ago, and while the pay is fine, there are no retirement benefits. We are currently maxing out my husband's 401k, and are talking aobut setting up a ROTH, but having a pre-tax benefit plan would be nice, and employer contibution even more so.

The new job offers twice as much paid vaction (6 weeks instead of 3), a 3% match to 401k that I can open the day I start working there, paid continuing education, dental, and a small raise to boot.

Contemplating leaving where I am at when I am perfectly happy there seems strange, but at the same time this new opportunity found me, and part of me feels like I'd be an idiot not to take it?

Any thoughts, words of encouragement, or sage advice to bestow upon me?
 

Sprinkles&Stones

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
May 19, 2020
Messages
1,048
I am in almost the exact same position as you, so thank you for sharing! Isn’t it odd when on paper something looks great, but for whatever reason we hesitate? When there’s just that last little bump that keeps us where we are comfortable.

I think your new job sounds like it makes more financial sense. Of course there won’t be any job that’s *perfect* and without hiccups.

I know for me right now, I am trying to decide what is worth more: the job offer with better pay, or staying where I am at because it’s comfortable and I am happy but the pay and benefits suck.

don’t you wish you could shake the bottle and have the genie pop out and tell you what to do?! I do!!!!

I hope others chime in too.
 

vintageinjune

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
427
I believe I could leave without burning bridges as in the current office would give me a good reference if ever needed, but I suspect would be reluctant to rehire me in the future if I decided I would like to go back.

I have several "back up" employment opportunities that I can fall back on if ever needed, so getting locked out of future employment isn't an issue.
 

PinkAndBlueBling

Brilliant_Rock
Premium
Joined
Dec 16, 2017
Messages
1,192
OMG! How wonderful that you are so wanted! That's an enviable position to be in. I say go for it. It sounds like they truly value you, and as an oldish person, I'm telling you that you really have to think about retirement, even in your 30s. And double vacation?! Pack your bags!
 

ItsMainelyYou

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jun 27, 2014
Messages
1,911
I believe I could leave without burning bridges as in the current office would give me a good reference if ever needed, but I suspect would be reluctant to rehire me in the future if I decided I would like to go back.

I have several "back up" employment opportunities that I can fall back on if ever needed, so getting locked out of future employment isn't an issue.

You have references, you have backup contingencies, you have new opportunity.
It's a whole lot of confluence for you to ignore for comfort's sake.
It's a measured risk, but what is ever gained without chance?
I say jump.
 

GeliL

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 30, 2018
Messages
197
If you feel good about the people and the company I'd definitely say go for it! Perhaps you can ask to speak with the potential coworkers there in an 1 on 1 to get a grasp of what it's like and see if it's something you are looking for. That was what I did when I couldn't decide.

Most regrets stem from inaction, and you never know, maybe the old company would rehire you if they think you are valuable enough to rehire, since they wouldn't need to train you again. People tend to settle where they are comfortable since they have a good grasp of their current situation and would hesitate to reach for the unknown, but you never know until you try! Maybe you will be happier there, especially with the double vacation.
 

Lookinagain

Brilliant_Rock
Premium
Joined
May 15, 2014
Messages
1,882
The new job offers twice as much paid vaction (6 weeks instead of 3), a 3% match to 401k that I can open the day I start working there, paid continuing education, dental, and a small raise to boot.

All other things being equal, the 401k with a match is something to seriously consider. If your current job has no retirement benefits, you probably won't want to stay there too long anyway. Although you are still young in your mid-30's there is a limit to how much you can contribute each year to your 401k and it takes time to build up enough for a nice retirement. You probably don't want to work at your current job with no retirement benefits until you hit 40. I know you can save on your own for retirement in other vehicles, but having the 401k come out of your check and getting the match makes it something you don't even have to think about. But you do need to consider how many years it takes for that match to be vested 100%. You should feel pretty confident that you will stay there long enough to take advantage of full vesting. Some companies do that in 3 years, some 5, some 7, etc. If you're one who expects to move around fairly often, the match may not do much good.
 

DejaWiz

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Apr 23, 2021
Messages
900
Opportunities such as this rarely manifest for a majority of people and when they do, there's usually some sacrifice involved (less vacation time, diminished retirement contribution, significantly longer commute distance, etc).
I say seize your day and go for it!
 

lala646

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Nov 4, 2018
Messages
660
Speaking as someone who receives 6 weeks paid vacation at my current job, it is such a luxury in this day & age. Most of my friends have 2-3 weeks, regardless of their tenure in their job. That alone would be enough to tempt me to jump ship. The other perks are icing on the cake (and not insignificant icing, at that).
 

Daisys and Diamonds

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Apr 30, 2019
Messages
12,433
Earlier this year, someone I had worked with gave my number to someone else in the industry when they were talking about how they were looking for someone to fill a position. They reached out to me and asked if I was interested in their position, but I replied that I was happy where I was at. Then they asked what it would take to make leaving worth my while.

I took a few days and wrote a several paragraphs long, detailed response, and they said they would keep me posted on if they could make that work. Months and months went by, peppered intermittently with them touching base with me just as I'd thought they'd given up and/or found someone else to fill the job. They always reached out to touch base with me, never I to them.

Last week, I was contacted and informed that they were excited to announce a position meeting my requirements was theirs to offer. I have working interviews set up and have already toured the office and had a chance to observe it for several hours and interview current employees.

The culture seems to match all my requirments (bonus: I personally know someone who worked there and had nothing but wonderful things to say about it, but also know people who have worked there who admit the place frequently runs late), during my tour I announced the need for some additional equipment and a couple small changes to standards that were not being met, fully expecting push back about spending that kind of money - yet to my delighted shock, I was thanked for informing them of the change in industry standards and told "this is why a new set of eyes is always good, they can see things you miss because you've been too close for too long and can learn something new".

I'm in my mid 30s, just started my current job barely more than a year ago, and while the pay is fine, there are no retirement benefits. We are currently maxing out my husband's 401k, and are talking aobut setting up a ROTH, but having a pre-tax benefit plan would be nice, and employer contibution even more so.

The new job offers twice as much paid vaction (6 weeks instead of 3), a 3% match to 401k that I can open the day I start working there, paid continuing education, dental, and a small raise to boot.

Contemplating leaving where I am at when I am perfectly happy there seems strange, but at the same time this new opportunity found me, and part of me feels like I'd be an idiot not to take it?

Any thoughts, words of encouragement, or sage advice to bestow upon me?

Oh my Goodness
This is wonderful
And its never too early to start aggressively planning for retirement
You must be worth your weight in gold and this new place knows it !
Best wishes for a very rewarding career with them
 

vintageinjune

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
427
I am in almost the exact same position as you, so thank you for sharing! Isn’t it odd when on paper something looks great, but for whatever reason we hesitate? When there’s just that last little bump that keeps us where we are comfortable.

I think your new job sounds like it makes more financial sense. Of course there won’t be any job that’s *perfect* and without hiccups.

I know for me right now, I am trying to decide what is worth more: the job offer with better pay, or staying where I am at because it’s comfortable and I am happy but the pay and benefits suck.

don’t you wish you could shake the bottle and have the genie pop out and tell you what to do?! I do!!!!

I hope others chime in too.

Oh, I wish you the best of luck with this struggle!

Comfort and low/almost no workplace drama is one of the perks at my current job, which is worth way more than money to me. So far it seems it would be a fairly even trade as far as pros and cons as far as workplace culture are concerned.

Do you know if your job offer with better pay would be at a company as equally good to work for as your current one?
 

vintageinjune

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
427
OMG! How wonderful that you are so wanted! That's an enviable position to be in. I say go for it. It sounds like they truly value you, and as an oldish person, I'm telling you that you really have to think about retirement, even in your 30s. And double vacation?! Pack your bags!

Yes, we are in our mid thirties and ideally would like to retire by age 55, which is why we are aggressively paying down debt and looking in to ways to boost our retirement funds and strategies. If I could go back in time I'd have started saving for retirement in my late teens, but oh well, here we are!

Part of the allure of the extra weeks of vacation is that I can either actually get paid to not work, OR I can do substitute work those weeks and get double the money! :lol:
 

vintageinjune

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
427
You have references, you have backup contingencies, you have new opportunity.
It's a whole lot of confluence for you to ignore for comfort's sake.
It's a measured risk, but what is ever gained without chance?
I say jump.

Thank you! I appreciate the honestly and bluntness.
Guilt comes in to play, along with the comfort, as a reason that crosses my mind to stay where I am at. How do I tell my current employer that, thank you so much, I love it here, but I am choosing to leave anyway?
 

vintageinjune

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
427
If you feel good about the people and the company I'd definitely say go for it! Perhaps you can ask to speak with the potential coworkers there in an 1 on 1 to get a grasp of what it's like and see if it's something you are looking for. That was what I did when I couldn't decide.

Most regrets stem from inaction, and you never know, maybe the old company would rehire you if they think you are valuable enough to rehire, since they wouldn't need to train you again. People tend to settle where they are comfortable since they have a good grasp of their current situation and would hesitate to reach for the unknown, but you never know until you try! Maybe you will be happier there, especially with the double vacation.

What an excellent point about regrets stemming from inaction!
It reminds me of that saying "You will always regret the things you didn't do more than the ones you did".
If it were a friend of mine in this situation, I would be encouraging them to explore or just outright accept the job, so I'm laughing a bit at myself for being so hesitant.
However.... I did set up the working interviews, and my first one is tomorrow. ^_^
 

ItsMainelyYou

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jun 27, 2014
Messages
1,911
Thank you! I appreciate the honestly and bluntness.
Guilt comes in to play, along with the comfort, as a reason that crosses my mind to stay where I am at. How do I tell my current employer that, thank you so much, I love it here, but I am choosing to leave anyway?

As graciously as you can. In the end you have to do what's best for your future. Opportunity sometimes comes a knocking. It's best most times to answer.
 

vintageinjune

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
427
All other things being equal, the 401k with a match is something to seriously consider. If your current job has no retirement benefits, you probably won't want to stay there too long anyway. Although you are still young in your mid-30's there is a limit to how much you can contribute each year to your 401k and it takes time to build up enough for a nice retirement. You probably don't want to work at your current job with no retirement benefits until you hit 40. I know you can save on your own for retirement in other vehicles, but having the 401k come out of your check and getting the match makes it something you don't even have to think about. But you do need to consider how many years it takes for that match to be vested 100%. You should feel pretty confident that you will stay there long enough to take advantage of full vesting. Some companies do that in 3 years, some 5, some 7, etc. If you're one who expects to move around fairly often, the match may not do much good.

I had thought that I'd be at my current position for possibly the rest of my career honestly. Job hopping is not on my radar, and I only left my previous position of 6.5 years due to being laid off last year because of the pandemic and inadvertently coming across the position I have now while trying to help a friend find a new job. (My former postion was laid off with job attached, but ultimately there were some moral/ethical issues that once I was forced to confront while stuck at home with no work, I could not justify going back).

Thank you for the information about the full vesting - I will inquire about that tomorrow. We are fully vested at my husband's job, and we've been maxing out contributions to his 401k for about 5 years, and he gets a match as well (I think still only 3%, but hey, it is something).

Should I accept this new position, it is with the expectation that I'll be there until either the owners or I retire.
 

vintageinjune

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
427
Speaking as someone who receives 6 weeks paid vacation at my current job, it is such a luxury in this day & age. Most of my friends have 2-3 weeks, regardless of their tenure in their job. That alone would be enough to tempt me to jump ship. The other perks are icing on the cake (and not insignificant icing, at that).

My last position gave me 6 weeks of time off each year, and I will admit that I have definitely noticed the difference, physical and mental, of only having the 3 weeks, and 2 of them are pre-determined for the entire office.
 

vintageinjune

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
427
Oh my Goodness
This is wonderful
And its never too early to start aggressively planning for retirement
You must be worth your weight in gold and this new place knows it !
Best wishes for a very rewarding career with them

:lol-2: Can I just say how much I adore that you skipped straight to well wishes on my rewarding career with them? That does give a clear answer on where I should be headed from an outsider perspective, and I thank you for sharing your thoughts and encouragement with me.

Retirement planning is being taken very seriously right now, we are in our mid 30s, we have 14 years left on the mortgage, and I need to finish paying off my student loans (little over half way there), but we own our cars and carry no other debt.
 

Lookinagain

Brilliant_Rock
Premium
Joined
May 15, 2014
Messages
1,882
IWe are fully vested at my husband's job, and we've been maxing out contributions to his 401k for about 5 years, and he gets a match as well (I think still only 3%, but hey, it is something).

I think 3% up to a certain % of what you contribute isn't unusual. I've worked at two large companies and both matched 50% but only up to the employees 6% contribution, so basically they matched 3%. However, one took 7 years to fully vest, while the other was 3 years. Big difference. I'm sure some companies match at at higher rate, but the 3% isn't all that unusual. And yes, better than nothing.
 

vintageinjune

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
427
As graciously as you can. In the end you have to do what's best for your future. Opportunity sometimes comes a knocking. It's best most times to answer.

Well, there you go again, telling me what I probably already know but need to verify.

Interestingly..... a former colleague of mine and I reconnected a couple weeks ago. She was applying for a position with my former office and called me to get the scoop, and ultimately decided to not take the job for many of the same reasons I left, but she is still searching for the right fit and would actually be a near perfect fit for my current position. Her request of me was to let her know if my office was ever hiring because she would be very interested in applying.

Admittedly, I would fee much less guilty about leaving if I could also supply my replacement!
 

Lookinagain

Brilliant_Rock
Premium
Joined
May 15, 2014
Messages
1,882
I think many of us often have so much loyalty to a job that we feel bad about leaving, even it it's a better opportunity for us. I know I've been guilty of that. I think research shows that women are more guilty of that than men. It's interesting. So I understand why you would feel less guilty if you provided them with a good replacement. I feel like that about my job as I think about retiring. But there are also times when I think.....jeez, I don't have to worry about that because by the time it becomes an issue that I would normally have to deal with, I'll be gone=)2
 

ItsMainelyYou

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jun 27, 2014
Messages
1,911
Well, there you go again, telling me what I probably already know but need to verify.

Interestingly..... a former colleague of mine and I reconnected a couple weeks ago. She was applying for a position with my former office and called me to get the scoop, and ultimately decided to not take the job for many of the same reasons I left, but she is still searching for the right fit and would actually be a near perfect fit for my current position. Her request of me was to let her know if my office was ever hiring because she would be very interested in applying.

Admittedly, I would fee much less guilty about leaving if I could also supply my replacement!

See?!
Confluence of events! A fortuitous assuaging of feelings! It can't get more neon, you know? :lol:
 

MillieLou

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Feb 27, 2020
Messages
644
Thank you! I appreciate the honestly and bluntness.
Guilt comes in to play, along with the comfort, as a reason that crosses my mind to stay where I am at. How do I tell my current employer that, thank you so much, I love it here, but I am choosing to leave anyway?

I was given good advice by a senior colleague when I was a junior employee, with naive ideas about loyalty:

They would drop you in a hot second if you didn't fit into their plans any more. Always put yourself first in your career, because your employer isn't going to.

He said it's often women who stay out of loyalty and then feel betrayed when their employer screws them over (often around pay and career progression).

Also, a workplace culture and team can change faster than you think. It only takes one or two people to leave / join. Don't stay in a job purely because you like your colleagues. That's a bonus, but look at the hard facts like pay, benefits, commuting time, job security etc.

You're doing nothing wrong. I venture to guess this wouldn't even be a dilemma for a man. Re-read your OP - you've given ten good reasons to leave and zero to stay :devil:

Also: read Nice Girls Don't Get The Corner Office.
 

Sprinkles&Stones

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
May 19, 2020
Messages
1,048
Oh, I wish you the best of luck with this struggle!

Comfort and low/almost no workplace drama is one of the perks at my current job, which is worth way more than money to me. So far it seems it would be a fairly even trade as far as pros and cons as far as workplace culture are concerned.

Do you know if your job offer with better pay would be at a company as equally good to work for as your current one?

Oh gosh, that's an easy one.

The company I work for currently is terrible. Low pay, no benefits.

The new place is far better on paper and I have a lot of friends who have switched companies and love it. I think being comfortable where I am at is the biggest hinderance to be honest.
 

vintageinjune

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
427
I was given good advice by a senior colleague when I was a junior employee, with naive ideas about loyalty:

They would drop you in a hot second if you didn't fit into their plans any more. Always put yourself first in your career, because your employer isn't going to.

He said it's often women who stay out of loyalty and then feel betrayed when their employer screws them over (often around pay and career progression).

Also, a workplace culture and team can change faster than you think. It only takes one or two people to leave / join. Don't stay in a job purely because you like your colleagues. That's a bonus, but look at the hard facts like pay, benefits, commuting time, job security etc.

You're doing nothing wrong. I venture to guess this wouldn't even be a dilemma for a man. Re-read your OP - you've given ten good reasons to leave and zero to stay :devil:

Also: read Nice Girls Don't Get The Corner Office.

There was an incident earlier this year that briefly caused the discussion to arise about possibly eliminating one of the four in my position at my office (not due to anything any of us did, but external circumstances beyond our control), they ultimately decided against it, but I made it clear if someone had to go, I'd volunteer because I have other job offers on the table. So, yes, they would drop someone in an instant if they felt it served their needs best (there was talk about the top choice being someone who had worked there for 22+ years, and I was appalled they would consider doing that to her, hence the reason I voiced that I would volunteer to leave).

My working interview at the new office yesterday went well, BUT there was less than half the staff present because the person who would be my boss is out with her staff this week on one of those 6 weeks of paid vacation they do. Next week I have a working interview with her and her staff, and if it goes as well as yesterday, I do think it would be in my future best interest to accept the position.

Thank you for the advice, reality check, and book recommendation!

The good reasons to stay are
 

vintageinjune

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
427
Did you mean to write more or was this intentionally blank ;-)

:lol-2: :lol-2: :lol-2:

I was trying to start a list that wasn't "good coworkers" and "low stress", and apparently didn't delete the whole thing! Not intentional, but perhaps my subconcious got the better of me.

Change is uncomfortable, but that discomfort is necessary for growth.

If next week's working interview goes well, I will take the job. I assured them an answer by next Friday (the day after the second working interview).
 
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