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Symmetry or Brillance?

Discussion in 'RockyTalky' started by oriental, Apr 4, 2002.

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  1. oriental
    Rough_Rock

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    by oriental » Apr 4, 2002
    As I understood, the performance of a diamond is determined by its % light return and hence brillance. So what is the value of having a diamond that is cut to high symmetry?
     
    


    


  2. pricescope
    Ideal_Rock

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    by pricescope » Apr 4, 2002
    Symmetry is a separate factor affecting desirability (or beauty) of diamonds. Non symmetrical diamond can be very brilliant.

    Perfectly symmetrical diamond can be dull (see Ideal-Scope: Symmetry).

    Diamonds with traditional ideal proportions and symmetry cost more.

    You have to look at different diamond and decide for yourself :)
     
  3. lawmax
    Brilliant_Rock

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    by lawmax » Apr 4, 2002
    Many people prefer diamonds that are optically symmetrical. They like it when the facets are perfectly aligned to act like mirrors and they like the effect of the contrast of dark and light in the diamond. The contrast enhances the eye's perception of brilliance.

    Some people have discussed the big, bold flashes of white and colored light returned vs. random little sparkles in less symmetrical diamonds. To a certain extent, this is a matter of personal preference. Try to compare diamonds in person, outside of the jewelry store lighting to see what you prefer. You will pay more for precise craftsmanship. There is more to a diamond's beauty than just brilliance (return of white light). It would appear that cut grading in the not too distant future will be based on optical symmetry and not on external proportions.
     
  4. oldminer
    Ideal_Rock
    Trade

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    by oldminer » Apr 4, 2002
    There are proportions of diamonds that will cause the diamond to be a poor reflector of light, less durable, or too deep compared to its width. The proportions that are reasonably the best because of the potential for brilliancy, durability and pleasing shape are pretty well already determined. All that remains is quantified results of the brilliancy, scintillation and dispersion of these well cut stones in order to know which of these is the best performing overall combination cut characteristics and brightness.

    Light performance measurement alone will not ever define a well cut diamond. Proportions alone don't define it either. Both work together to determine what will be judged the best range overall.
     
    


    


  5. oriental
    Rough_Rock

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    by oriental » Apr 4, 2002
    Thanks for all your replies.

    I am from Singapore where the jewelers/salespersons are not as sophistcated as those in the US. Visitng a showroom doesn't help much in my selection because of the limited tools that the jewelers have to illustrate to customers the merits of each stone. It is often frustrating to see the jewelers justify a customer's buy based solely on their brand name and not on the physical attributes of the stone and cut.

    In this context, if my objective is to get a diamond that is very brillant, what tools can best help me? How about going for a AGS000 stoe with a low HCA score and shows very little light leakage under the idealscope?
     
  6. lawmax
    Brilliant_Rock

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    by lawmax » Apr 5, 2002
    You can use the ideal scope to shop there and compare the diamonds that do well with it to see what is most appealing to your eye. Remember to see the diamonds in natural lighting.

    You can also shop online for stones here in the US. Many vendors will even send the diamond to an independent appraiser like oldminer before you pay for the stone so he can check it out for you. He has ideal scopes. Then, after his appraisal of the diamond, if you want the stone, you can pay for it and have it shipped to you. You really can't beat the prices and cut quality that you can find here in the US.

    Good luck :)
     
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