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Spread =Apparent size explanation

Texas Leaguer

Ideal_Rock
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We are working on video that explains Spread Phenomena.
It will be great you if have a chance to check the current version and provide your feedbacks.
. The most valuable is to point out unclear slides and explanations.
A lot of good stuff here Serg. The visuals are great. I just played it through once and won't have any specific feedback until I get a chance to go through it carefully.

My overall impression is that it may be a little too fast paced for the average consumer. It might make sense to make different versions for different audiences. Simplifying anything is a good exercise as it can get you to the essence of what you are trying to communicate.

Having a professional in each target language do the voice over would also help a consumer follow along better.
 

MRBXXXFVVS1

Brilliant_Rock
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I love the content of this video, as it gave a very thorough explanation of spread and how the different fancy cuts compared!

I am a reasonably advanced consumer (not expert or trade) and did get a little confused from 2:06 until the dessert example - I think that segment moved a bit too quickly for the density of information. I also got confused with the first diamond comparison that referenced calories - I think the analogy could be removed there and get the same message across.
 

Serg

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A lot of good stuff here Serg. The visuals are great. I just played it through once and won't have any specific feedback until I get a chance to go through it carefully.

My overall impression is that it may be a little too fast paced for the average consumer. It might make sense to make different versions for different audiences. Simplifying anything is a good exercise as it can get you to the essence of what you are trying to communicate.

Having a professional in each target language do the voice over would also help a consumer follow along better.
Hi Bryan,

Thank you for the comments.

We are thinking about short and simplest version.
What should a simplest version include / exclude ?
 

oldminer

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I suggest you provide several examples of the relationship of mass to visual size. GO at a slower pace, for sure. It is a most important consideration because it is one of the things your naked eyes can actually appreciate when selecting a diamond. You can't readily discern a single color grade from the next, or one clarity grade from the next. We know you can't judge the actual weight visually with any degree of exactness. But, your eyes can see a 0.1mm or 0.2mm difference in length/width or round diameter. The measure of spread automatically takes into account the many nuance things cutters use to retain weigh such as a bit too much depth, use of somewhat heavier than the best girdle thickness, changes in crown and pavilions angles, and several other ways to incrementally increase retained weight without gaining any visual, face-up benefit for the stone. The benefit to the cutter is "weight", but the consumer is best served by a most efficient delivery of a properly cut stone without this added, invisible weight.

The examples need to go at a bit slower pace and be more clear about how one might calculate such cutting efficiency. I would think everyone would require more data than having just a standard GIA or AGS report to make these spread calculation comparisons.

You have to also consider what happens to a perfectly fine AGS000 which has a 97% spread. Does it become unsalable or does it need to be discounted? Is an AGS000 stone with a 103% spread better than a 100% one or is it also relegated to a second class stone? What do you foresee and what do you suggest? When I worked for 15 years with Imagem, Inc, we had the ability to provide a mass to spread ratio and did not find anyone in the diamond trade interested or willing to take on such potentially unwelcome information. Can you make a convincing argument for implementing such a calculation? I'm a supporter of the truth and of facts, but I do you see these secondary consequences having some importance?

I'm not attacking here and I hope you don't feel that way. I like to understand things before I move anything meaningfully in a new direction. Many here will feel the same.
 

AprilBaby

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I am a visual learner. It was good until you got to the food and calories. I got bored and lost. The last section on spread was good. The monotone voice needs improvement.
 

Texas Leaguer

Ideal_Rock
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Hi Bryan,

Thank you for the comments.

We are thinking about short and simplest version.
What should a simplest version include / exclude ?
Serg,
Here are my comments after watching the video again. I hope you find this kind of critique helpful.

The concept of spread is important to understand for both consumers and professionals alike. The fact is that most professionals may not fully understand it themselves, or have the ability to explain it. So it is valuable to have an easy to digest video with good graphics and clear explanation to bring this factor into better focus and to promote practical use.

There are really three main goals of this lesson:
  • Define and illustrate the concept of spread
  • Explain the importance of considering spread in the shopping process
  • Create a metric that can be used by shoppers to compare diamonds on this value factor.
The best lessons are those that are succinct – not longer than they need to be to convey the essential information. They should be easy to follow and should impart 85-90 percent of the knowledge in a single viewing. Chances are, the viewer is on a journey to learn more about diamonds than this one aspect, so making the content efficient allows them to gain this piece of knowledge and move on, rather than having to replay it a number of times to fully grasp the concepts.

Therefore, all extraneous information needs to be stripped out. While the history of how the term ‘carat’ came to be used may be interesting, it is not necessarily relevant to understanding spread. Extensive analogies to things such as nutritional value may create a learning curve inside a learning curve, making the content convoluted and more laborious while doing little to make the concept of spread more understandable.

In order to accomplish content efficiency and effectiveness, the lesson needs to be developed with a specific audience in mind. So if different audiences are targeted, different versions may need to be created. I assume there are two basic audiences – consumer and trade. They are not all that different actually, so much of the same content can be used in both versions. Give the trade a little more of the hard science. The consumer version can have a link to the trade version to ‘learn more’.

Good content, like a good essay, has basic parts:
  • Introduction- define the topic and tell the audience what you are going to tell them.
  • Body – illustrations and explanations of the concept and why it is important.
  • Summary – Tell them what you told them and give them practical advice on how to apply it.
So, I would start with a basic explanation of spread and the fact that diamond ‘carat’ is not the same as size. It is a measure of weight (or in scientific language, ‘mass’). Believe it or not, this prerequisite fact is not generally understood by the consumer market! The graphic with all the 1.00 carat stones and the moving blue outline showing the differences in actual size is highly effective and is all you need to introduce the concept in a very intuitive way that both consumers and trade will appreciate.

Next, is why spread matters in terms of value. The difference in price between the well cut .97ct and the heavily made 1.17 of the same size should be fleshed out. This is a matter of primary importance to the consumer. More emphasis also needs to be made of the detrimental effects on light performance of the retention of unnecessary weight. It’s a double whammy for the consumer – they are paying much more for inferior performance.

By the 80/20 rule I would focus mostly on rounds for the general understanding. The reasons that this is also an important factor for fancy cuts can be further explained after the general understanding of the concept has been established using rounds.

The reference to Tolkowsky will not be effective for most consumers without explanation. That it is a general standard for well cut rounds should be called out. This leads into the section explaining the metric for calculating spread and how it can be used by the consumer to understand at a glance how close the spread of particular stone is to what it should be, how much excess padding has been left on the stone, or how stripped down it is. In cases where the number is high (positive or negative), further analysis of light performance is critical.

Finally, the conclusion should be a summary of the basic sections; that we now know what spread is, the impacts it has on price and performance, how it is calculated, and how the metric can be effectively used in shopping for diamonds.
 

Garry H (Cut Nut)

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Messages
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Serg,
Here are my comments after watching the video again. I hope you find this kind of critique helpful.

The concept of spread is important to understand for both consumers and professionals alike. The fact is that most professionals may not fully understand it themselves, or have the ability to explain it. So it is valuable to have an easy to digest video with good graphics and clear explanation to bring this factor into better focus and to promote practical use.

There are really three main goals of this lesson:
  • Define and illustrate the concept of spread
  • Explain the importance of considering spread in the shopping process
  • Create a metric that can be used by shoppers to compare diamonds on this value factor.
The best lessons are those that are succinct – not longer than they need to be to convey the essential information. They should be easy to follow and should impart 85-90 percent of the knowledge in a single viewing. Chances are, the viewer is on a journey to learn more about diamonds than this one aspect, so making the content efficient allows them to gain this piece of knowledge and move on, rather than having to replay it a number of times to fully grasp the concepts.

Therefore, all extraneous information needs to be stripped out. While the history of how the term ‘carat’ came to be used may be interesting, it is not necessarily relevant to understanding spread. Extensive analogies to things such as nutritional value may create a learning curve inside a learning curve, making the content convoluted and more laborious while doing little to make the concept of spread more understandable.

In order to accomplish content efficiency and effectiveness, the lesson needs to be developed with a specific audience in mind. So if different audiences are targeted, different versions may need to be created. I assume there are two basic audiences – consumer and trade. They are not all that different actually, so much of the same content can be used in both versions. Give the trade a little more of the hard science. The consumer version can have a link to the trade version to ‘learn more’.

Good content, like a good essay, has basic parts:
  • Introduction- define the topic and tell the audience what you are going to tell them.
  • Body – illustrations and explanations of the concept and why it is important.
  • Summary – Tell them what you told them and give them practical advice on how to apply it.
So, I would start with a basic explanation of spread and the fact that diamond ‘carat’ is not the same as size. It is a measure of weight (or in scientific language, ‘mass’). Believe it or not, this prerequisite fact is not generally understood by the consumer market! The graphic with all the 1.00 carat stones and the moving blue outline showing the differences in actual size is highly effective and is all you need to introduce the concept in a very intuitive way that both consumers and trade will appreciate.

Next, is why spread matters in terms of value. The difference in price between the well cut .97ct and the heavily made 1.17 of the same size should be fleshed out. This is a matter of primary importance to the consumer. More emphasis also needs to be made of the detrimental effects on light performance of the retention of unnecessary weight. It’s a double whammy for the consumer – they are paying much more for inferior performance.

By the 80/20 rule I would focus mostly on rounds for the general understanding. The reasons that this is also an important factor for fancy cuts can be further explained after the general understanding of the concept has been established using rounds.

The reference to Tolkowsky will not be effective for most consumers without explanation. That it is a general standard for well cut rounds should be called out. This leads into the section explaining the metric for calculating spread and how it can be used by the consumer to understand at a glance how close the spread of particular stone is to what it should be, how much excess padding has been left on the stone, or how stripped down it is. In cases where the number is high (positive or negative), further analysis of light performance is critical.

Finally, the conclusion should be a summary of the basic sections; that we now know what spread is, the impacts it has on price and performance, how it is calculated, and how the metric can be effectively used in shopping for diamonds.
Well said Bryan!
Sergey you need a word for Tolkowsky - you will not use Ideal - even though it is the common term. What word?
In Bryan's eg of the 97 vs 1,17ct - the 0.97 well cut will look larger in 80% of viewing conditions.
That is also important, but harder to get across.
Bryan fancy shapes have way more cheating on spread than rounds - and solving that problem will lead to more diversity of better shapes and more efficiency in what is produced.
 

Texas Leaguer

Ideal_Rock
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Messages
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Well said Bryan!
Sergey you need a word for Tolkowsky - you will not use Ideal - even though it is the common term. What word?
In Bryan's eg of the 97 vs 1,17ct - the 0.97 well cut will look larger in 80% of viewing conditions.
That is also important, but harder to get across.
Bryan fancy shapes have way more cheating on spread than rounds - and solving that problem will lead to more diversity of better shapes and more efficiency in what is produced.
I agree Garry. But I think the general concept is easier to communicate if you focus first on rounds. An in-depth discussion of fancies could be a follow on lesson or part 2 of the same lesson. The excellent visual Serg created with all the different one carat stones with the blue outline quickly conveys the applicability and importance of the spread factor across all shapes.

But it seems like a standard needs to be established for each shape against which to compare members of that shape. And there will need to be some general agreement about that standard. Rounds are compared against Tolkowsky because that basic proportion set has been validated by light performance analysis to be in the sweetspot of overall light performance, and therefore has garnered general acceptance. Also, rounds are simpler because they have a common facet arrangement and are highly symmetrical.
 

Garry H (Cut Nut)

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Messages
15,327
I disagree Bryan a bit.
Using a standard for all shapes fully and openly informs.
The point is about spread.
We know for e.g. that some people have tried to use the diagonal measurement of square stones - that is misleading info.
People know what round is.
They do not know that marquise can be twice the spread of asscher.
 

Serg

Ideal_Rock
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Mar 21, 2002
Messages
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Serg,
Here are my comments after watching the video again. I hope you find this kind of critique helpful.

The concept of spread is important to understand for both consumers and professionals alike. The fact is that most professionals may not fully understand it themselves, or have the ability to explain it. So it is valuable to have an easy to digest video with good graphics and clear explanation to bring this factor into better focus and to promote practical use.

There are really three main goals of this lesson:
  • Define and illustrate the concept of spread
  • Explain the importance of considering spread in the shopping process
  • Create a metric that can be used by shoppers to compare diamonds on this value factor.
The best lessons are those that are succinct – not longer than they need to be to convey the essential information. They should be easy to follow and should impart 85-90 percent of the knowledge in a single viewing. Chances are, the viewer is on a journey to learn more about diamonds than this one aspect, so making the content efficient allows them to gain this piece of knowledge and move on, rather than having to replay it a number of times to fully grasp the concepts.

Therefore, all extraneous information needs to be stripped out. While the history of how the term ‘carat’ came to be used may be interesting, it is not necessarily relevant to understanding spread. Extensive analogies to things such as nutritional value may create a learning curve inside a learning curve, making the content convoluted and more laborious while doing little to make the concept of spread more understandable.

In order to accomplish content efficiency and effectiveness, the lesson needs to be developed with a specific audience in mind. So if different audiences are targeted, different versions may need to be created. I assume there are two basic audiences – consumer and trade. They are not all that different actually, so much of the same content can be used in both versions. Give the trade a little more of the hard science. The consumer version can have a link to the trade version to ‘learn more’.

Good content, like a good essay, has basic parts:
  • Introduction- define the topic and tell the audience what you are going to tell them.
  • Body – illustrations and explanations of the concept and why it is important.
  • Summary – Tell them what you told them and give them practical advice on how to apply it.
So, I would start with a basic explanation of spread and the fact that diamond ‘carat’ is not the same as size. It is a measure of weight (or in scientific language, ‘mass’). Believe it or not, this prerequisite fact is not generally understood by the consumer market! The graphic with all the 1.00 carat stones and the moving blue outline showing the differences in actual size is highly effective and is all you need to introduce the concept in a very intuitive way that both consumers and trade will appreciate.

Next, is why spread matters in terms of value. The difference in price between the well cut .97ct and the heavily made 1.17 of the same size should be fleshed out. This is a matter of primary importance to the consumer. More emphasis also needs to be made of the detrimental effects on light performance of the retention of unnecessary weight. It’s a double whammy for the consumer – they are paying much more for inferior performance.

By the 80/20 rule I would focus mostly on rounds for the general understanding. The reasons that this is also an important factor for fancy cuts can be further explained after the general understanding of the concept has been established using rounds.

The reference to Tolkowsky will not be effective for most consumers without explanation. That it is a general standard for well cut rounds should be called out. This leads into the section explaining the metric for calculating spread and how it can be used by the consumer to understand at a glance how close the spread of particular stone is to what it should be, how much excess padding has been left on the stone, or how stripped down it is. In cases where the number is high (positive or negative), further analysis of light performance is critical.

Finally, the conclusion should be a summary of the basic sections; that we now know what spread is, the impacts it has on price and performance, how it is calculated, and how the metric can be effectively used in shopping for diamonds.
Thank you for a detailed analysis and suggestions.
re:Good content, like a good essay, has basic parts:
  • Introduction- define the topic and tell the audience what you are going to tell them.
  • Body – illustrations and explanations of the concept and why it is important.
  • Summary – Tell them what you told them and give them practical advice on how to apply it.
Such an approach looks too boring and dry for me. We try to create educational stories spiced with some fun.
In the Spread story we tried to combine:
  1. Business approach Why, What, How
  2. Traditional 3 act story structure



I do not want to develop separate movies on Spread for trade and consumers. They speak now in very different languages . Our task is to help them to use one common language.
Of course, sometimes a 2-3 min film is a best option. And we will develop such a version after the completion of the long one. We are now at the middle point of the film. But maybe this drama will have more than 3 acts.
 

Texas Leaguer

Ideal_Rock
Trade
Joined
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Messages
3,209
I do not want to develop separate movies on Spread for trade and consumers. They speak now in very different languages . Our task is to help them to use one common language.
Of course, sometimes a 2-3 min film is a best option. And we will develop such a version after the completion of the long one. We are now at the middle point of the film. But maybe this drama will have more than 3 acts.
Creating a unified understanding of the concept that can be assimilated by trade and consumer alike is a worthy goal. But doing so in a single lesson is extra challenging. You have to convey the concepts in a way not to overwhelm the newbie at the same time hold the attention of the more advanced viewer. The risk is losing newbies before you convey the essential concept, and likewise losing more advanced audience who may think they already know the material, before really getting the full understanding across to either.

It can be done by breaking it into progressively more advanced parts. You will still need to convey the majority of the understanding you seek to convey in each section, without the other sections. In this way, as people choose to drop off they take with them a solid piece of understanding that is useful for their particular purposes.

What is spread?
Why is it important?
How is it calculated?
Factoring spread into your selection process

Rather than trying to make the entire subject conform to some format of storytelling, make each section conform. Each of the above subtopics can be made interesting and satisfying (if not fun and exciting!). And at the end of each you can tease them to check out the next act in the drama. :)
 

John Pollard

Ideal_Rock
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Messages
3,563
Creating a unified understanding of the concept that can be assimilated by trade and consumer alike is a worthy goal. But doing so in a single lesson is extra challenging. You have to convey the concepts in a way not to overwhelm the newbie at the same time hold the attention of the more advanced viewer. The risk is losing newbies before you convey the essential concept, and likewise losing more advanced audience who may think they already know the material, before really getting the full understanding across to either.

It can be done by breaking it into progressively more advanced parts. You will still need to convey the majority of the understanding you seek to convey in each section, without the other sections. In this way, as people choose to drop off they take with them a solid piece of understanding that is useful for their particular purposes.

What is spread?
Why is it important?
How is it calculated?
Factoring spread into your selection process

Rather than trying to make the entire subject conform to some format of storytelling, make each section conform. Each of the above subtopics can be made interesting and satisfying (if not fun and exciting!). And at the end of each you can tease them to check out the next act in the drama. :)
This is solid advice.

@Serg , the amount of content you're working to deliver here needs a tiered approach, using a defined educational taxonomy and employing its progression.
Example: http://www.pollardpro.com/uploads/blooms-taxonomy.jpg

The obstacle with a long-format is precisely as @Texas Leaguer outlines. New learners need a point-of-entry where basic concepts are defined or they'll be lost. Intermediate learners, who already grasp basics, need a different point-of-entry, traditionally at the application/analysis level, or else they'll get bored.

Of course, sometimes a 2-3 min film is a best option. And we will develop such a version after the completion of the long one. We are now at the middle point of the film. But maybe this drama will have more than 3 acts.
Beginning with the end in mind is great. So developing the long version first is great. I believe "the end" result could indeed be a series of graduated 2-3m installments. These could be sequenced and even titled in the spirit of 101, 201, 301 curriculae - where 101 is a prerequisite for 201. You can employ Freytag's Pyramid in each, to keep forward momentum, perhaps even keeping the same characters for continuity.
 

AV_

Ideal_Rock
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Messages
3,885
Is any reason to create one more similar video?
None show the effect of brilliance and diameter/weight together, as one sees this by lining up diamodns on the back of the hand - such play does not require thinking or talking, but a video might not get away without a few words, here & there; one minute is not short either [what is the Periscope time limit? - those feel quite right, short enough to fit among speech & lead]

2c
 

Serg

Ideal_Rock
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Messages
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None show the effect of brilliance and diameter/weight together, as one sees this by lining up diamodns on the back of the hand - such play does not require thinking or talking, but a video might not get away without a few words, here & there; one minute is not short either [what is the Periscope time limit? - those feel quite right, short enough to fit among speech & lead]

2c
Brilliance has not correlation with Spread .
 

oldminer

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Just like buying a diamond solely by what it weighs makes little sense, it would also make little sense to buy a diamond solely based on spread. If every diamond had a spread number generated in square millimetres next to its weight consumers and dealers would have a meaningful number to compare one stone to another in a factual way. It is an easy enough fact that most anyone can understand and interpret with just a short explanation. Joining such information with the other 4C's or 5C's necessary to pick a diamond from all others would be a useful data point of comparison.

Without specific and accepted parameters of what makes fancy shapes Excellent or Ideal we are left almost totally with round and a few modified round/cushion/square cuts. Still, that group makes up a large and important market. I see spread a meaning number for comparison shopping. Is there something else that I am totally missing?
 

Garry H (Cut Nut)

Super_Ideal_Rock
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I agree with Sergey that the relationship to a well cut round is the best communication method.
Tolkowsky is the wrong word - what would be best?

I disagree Sergey that trade and consumers should have different language.
Also I would aim for the shortest video to convey the message.
When you look at educational videos on shopping related topics many drop off after 3 seconds. Less than half are watching after 15 seconds. True those who will use the information may hang on longer - but why not convey the message to as many as practical.
 

Karl_K

Ideal_Rock
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Messages
9,812
I agree with Sergey that the relationship to a well cut round is the best communication method.
I am not a fan of MRBing fancies.
Cut grading allready does enough damage tryin to turn everything into a mrb.
 

Karl_K

Ideal_Rock
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The biggest huge problem with the video is that
depth does not equal spread in fancy cuts including princess cuts.
 

Serg

Ideal_Rock
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I agree with Sergey that the relationship to a well cut round is the best communication method.
Tolkowsky is the wrong word - what would be best?

I disagree Sergey that trade and consumers should have different language.
Also I would aim for the shortest video to convey the message.
When you look at educational videos on shopping related topics many drop off after 3 seconds. Less than half are watching after 15 seconds. True those who will use the information may hang on longer - but why not convey the message to as many as practical.
Garry,
I never said that trade and consumers should have different language .
I had said yesterday : "They speak now in very different languages . Our task is to help them to use one common language."
 

Lucy-In-The-Sky

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Messages
36
Oh god, please remove the calorie counting/food stuff.

I’m a plus size woman who loves diamonds and sweets. The calorie segment felt kind of judgmental in terms of equating virtue/goodness with lower calorie and lower sugar choices and that irritated me so much I stopped watching.

That’s the kind of messaging that makes me make a mental note to avoid a company.
 

Serg

Ideal_Rock
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Oh god, please remove the calorie counting/food stuff.

I’m a plus size woman who loves diamonds and sweets. The calorie segment felt kind of judgmental in terms of equating virtue/goodness with lower calorie and lower sugar choices and that irritated me so much I stopped watching.

That’s the kind of messaging that makes me make a mental note to avoid a company.
The calories example could be considered as a good analogy if it has not caused the severe side effect of negative emotions. We would be happy to use another analogy. Please recommend any other product group where consumer key value and the main price-maker dramatically differ as they differ in diamonds (apparent size - one of key values vs. carat weight - price-maker).
 

prs

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@Serg Consumers will readily accept the fact that diamonds are priced by weight, just like many other items they buy. The fact carat weight and the spread (size) of round diamonds are not the same and independent of each other will come as a big surprise to almost all consumers. It was news to me three years ago when we were shopping for studs. I was amazed how much the spread varied on a 1.40ct MRB depending on its total depth. I even drew up my own excel spreadsheet to figure out how much the face up area varied with depth!

I think that once a consumer is made aware of this fact it becomes self evident. The consumer will jump on the idea he or she can get a bigger diamond for the same money if they pay attention to depth. You don't really need a seven minute video to hammer home this fact. A much shorter video designed to get the point across as concisely and as clearly as possible might be more effective. Today's younger consumers have much shorter attention spans than us older folk. These days even the network nightly news programs have to change stories every 30 seconds to keep viewers from getting bored and switching channels.

Personally I would leave out fancy shapes altogether as they are much more complicated than rounds. Once the consumer has grasped the idea that carat weight doesn't equal size, you can bet the desire to save money will make him or her apply that knowledge to all their diamond purchases. I know I do!!!
 
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prs

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One thing I forgot to say in my previous post is I discovered this weight/size discrepancy because my wife had been trying to determine the largest size MRB that would look good in her beautiful, little earlobes. We were using a jeweler in the LA jewelry district, highly recommended by my wife's sister (long before we discovered DKJ). We had pretty much settled on a 1.40ct size but something about the process didn't feel quite right to me, so for the first time ever I went on-line to do some jewelry research. Unfortunately I didn't discover PS, but I did find enough to know I needed to at least demand the diamonds have GIA triple Ex certs. I then went on Blue Nile and James Allen to look for price comparables. It was whilst I was writing down the details that I noticed the difference in spread.

My first reaction was WTF is going on here, why didn't our jeweler tell us about this??? I was pretty miffed with our jeweler but in retrospect both Blue Nile and James Allen had also failed to point it out. As I think about this now, it's obviously not in the best interest of jewelers to tell customers about this. If they do there's going to be a boatload of diamonds that suddenly become less desirable.

Your final video will definitely be of great value to consumers, but getting the trade to buy in might be a very hard sell. In fact it's likely you are going to piss off a lot of dealers who own low spread stones. If these dealers are among your preferred potential customer base this might not be such a good idea! Sorry to be a bit of a wet blanket, but in my career I always found constructive criticism to be the most helpful.
 
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VeryUndecided

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We are working on video that explains Spread Phenomena.
It will be great you if have a chance to check the current version and provide your feedbacks.
. The most valuable is to point out unclear slides and explanations.
Brilliant video. In the middle, I have started salivating in an unexplainable manner and left the house to go and get Scharzwaelder Kirchtorte from the nearby bakery.
Did I miss anything? :D :D
 
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