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Oval diamond bowtie advice

urodiamond

Rough_Rock
Joined
Jan 23, 2021
Messages
3
Hi all,

Have purchased an oval diamond for AUD 21,000. 1.7 carat D VS2. Online expert advice was that this was a great diamond. However on the online images I was not able to appreciate the bowtie very well. Now when viewing it in person there is a bowtie which is variable on prominence depending on the lighting conditions.

Just wanted to get an opinion on whether this would be considered a very bad bowtie?


1611379816143.png


1611380324644.png 1611380345616.png 1611380363583.png
videos


Thanks!
 

urodiamond

Rough_Rock
Joined
Jan 23, 2021
Messages
3
Hi all,

Have purchased an oval diamond for AUD 21,000. 1.7 carat D VS2. Online expert advice was that this was a great diamond. However on the online images I was not able to appreciate the bowtie very well. Now when viewing it in person there is a bowtie which is variable on prominence depending on the lighting conditions.

Just wanted to get an opinion on whether this would be considered a very bad bowtie?


1611379816143.png


1611380324644.png 1611380345616.png 1611380363583.png
videos


Thanks!

additional video
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jun 8, 2008
Messages
45,958
additional video

I am not an oval aficionado but I know what I don't like and I don't like the dark areas (I think it is a bowtie but not an expert) I see in the video you shared. I am going to tag a bowtie expert who will be able to help you.


@tyty333 can you help @urodiamond.
 

tyty333

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Dec 17, 2008
Messages
23,557
I'm not loving it. Its a tough call to know when its a bow-tie and when its not. Bow-ties are dark and dont return light.
There are areas on some ovals that are in the shape of bow-ties but are actually nice facets that do return light.
These facets will go dark in bright light just like well-cut round brilliant goes dark in bright light.

I think maybe the best way to get around this is to buy a faceting pattern this is a 6main, 8 main straight across,
or 4 main. Yours is an 8 main with offset arrows (from the center). There are also ideal cut 10 main ovals.

Here is a 6 main...

Here is an 8 main straight across

4 main (not necessarily a great one)

You want to see nice facets come into view as the stone turns.
Here is your stone turned at an angle. There are no new nice light-returning facets in the red area. This area
would be considered "mushy".
Capture.PNG

Vs the 6 main I posted above. There are nice, well-defined, distinct facets that will return light
in the same area. Thats the kind of stone you want to look for. The center may go dark just like a round brilliant
in bright light but in general, you wont see as much of that bow-tie shape you are seeing in your stone.
Capture.PNG

Hope that helps some!
 

urodiamond

Rough_Rock
Joined
Jan 23, 2021
Messages
3
I'm not loving it. Its a tough call to know when its a bow-tie and when its not. Bow-ties are dark and dont return light.
There are areas on some ovals that are in the shape of bow-ties but are actually nice facets that do return light.
These facets will go dark in bright light just like well-cut round brilliant goes dark in bright light.

I think maybe the best way to get around this is to buy a faceting pattern this is a 6main, 8 main straight across,
or 4 main. Yours is an 8 main with offset arrows (from the center). There are also ideal cut 10 main ovals.

Here is a 6 main...

Here is an 8 main straight across

4 main (not necessarily a great one)

You want to see nice facets come into view as the stone turns.
Here is your stone turned at an angle. There are no new nice light-returning facets in the red area. This area
would be considered "mushy".
Capture.PNG

Vs the 6 main I posted above. There are nice, well-defined, distinct facets that will return light
in the same area. Thats the kind of stone you want to look for. The center may go dark just like a round brilliant
in bright light but in general, you wont see as much of that bow-tie shape you are seeing in your stone.
Capture.PNG

Hope that helps some!

Thank you for that - very helpful!


Just out of curiosity - apart from actually looking at the diamond in person do you have any other tips for minimising the chances of having a bowtie by looking at the online images?

Also I have noticed that the online pictures from James Allen tend to illustrate the bowtie (when it is present) quite well but the images from Blue nile tend to hide the bowtie completely.
 

tyty333

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Dec 17, 2008
Messages
23,557
I dont have any pointers except to watch the stones as they turn and to look for distinct, well-defined facets come into view (vs, mushy
gray facets).

There are some ideal ovals but they do tend to be $$$. They tend to have to be cut deeper to prevent mush and inturn face up smaller.

 

kasia109

Rough_Rock
Joined
Feb 18, 2021
Messages
5
Thank you for that - very helpful!


Just out of curiosity - apart from actually looking at the diamond in person do you have any other tips for minimising the chances of having a bowtie by looking at the online images?

Also I have noticed that the online pictures from James Allen tend to illustrate the bowtie (when it is present) quite well but the images from Blue nile tend to hide the bowtie completely.

There are recommended angles, depths and table sizes etc. that I followed, they are not a guarantee, but a good starting point. I compared the recommended criteria to the lab reports and only considered diamonds that met the criteria for excellent cut, and then analyzes images etc. When you research more, there is also suggestion that depth % can influence whether you have more fire vs. brilliance. There are lots of you tube videos as well to help.


Scroll down to: Oval Cut Diamond - Cut Quality Recommendations

This table is one of a few I found, but all the tables out there include pretty similar criteria.

Hope this helps.
 
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