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hoovillemd

Rough_Rock
Joined
Aug 11, 2002
Messages
50
Hello Everyone,
I have just purchased my new engagment ring and would like some info on if I got a good deal or not. I was told that this diamond is a H&A but I do not have a proportion scope to see the H&A. Is there any way to find out if this diamond is a true H&A without a scope? The ags# is 0002506101. Below are some specs on the diamond.

Cut Grade: AGS Ideal 0
polish: Ideal
symmetry: Ideal
Proportions: Ideal

Shape & Style: Round Brilliant
Measurements: 6.49-6.55*3.99mm
Color Grade: AGS 0 (D)
Clarity Grade: AGS 4 (VS2)
Carat Weight: 1.035 cts.
Fluorescence: Medium Blue

Table: 56%
Depth: 61.2%
Crown angle: 35.1
Pavilion angle: 40.8
culet %: 0
Faceted: 1.0% to 1.9%

I also put these numbers in the Holloway cut adviser an they came up as follows.

Light return: Excellent
Fire: Excellent
Scintillation: Excellent
Spread or
Diameter for Weight: Very Good




These are the specs of my diamond. The only question is about the medium blue fluorescence. I have looked at the diamond over and over again and it is perfect, But is the medium blue fluorescence a bad thing. I Payed $6300.00 for the diamond. Is this a good deal? I would like to thank everyone for any help the can give me on these issues. I have learned many new things from pricescope about the diamond I have purchased, but I would love to learn more about my diamond and diamonds in general.

Thanks,
Matt Dabney
 

Rhino

Ideal_Rock
Trade
Joined
Mar 28, 2001
Messages
6,271
There is no way to tell unless it is seen and inspected.

There are multitudes of AGS "0" cut grades with proportions like you mention that are not H&A's as variances in the minor facets can easily disrupt the internal symmetry of the diamond. Ideal external proportions is no guarantee to precision internal 3 dimensional symmetry.

Kind regards,
Rhino
 

Garry H (Cut Nut)

Super_Ideal_Rock
Trade
Joined
Aug 15, 2000
Messages
14,924
The only way to tell H&A's is with a viewer before the stone is set.
The ideal-scope will tell you a if the table side has perfect symmetry though.
But AGS 0 rating means the stone has excellent symmetry and you may not be able to tell the difference anyway.

Med Blue is an advantage in my opinion, I prefer strong though.

You have purchased a very fine diamond and you should enjoy it :)
 

hoovillemd

Rough_Rock
Joined
Aug 11, 2002
Messages
50
I would like to thank everyone for taking the time to write on this topic. You have all been very helpful.

Thanks,
Matt Dabney
 

hoovillemd

Rough_Rock
Joined
Aug 11, 2002
Messages
50
If I could get some more info on if I have picked out a good diamond or not that would be great.

Thanks,
Matt Dabney
 

hbright

Rough_Rock
Joined
Nov 24, 2002
Messages
40
Med. Blue is ostensibly not bad. I had a SB fluor stone that I returned because it looked noticeable blue violet in the sun. It wasn't "cloudy", but the strong tint made the diamond looke purple (eew!). It was still very bright and scintillating (my eyes hurt). Basically, it looked like an awesome colored diamond outdoors with no cloudiness. I tried to like SB, but the one thing that wasn't mentioned on the web was its purple tint which defeats the purpose of buying a white diamond! Well, I finally returned it and got one with faint blue fluor and it is not purple or blue at all. Phew.

Now, if fluor stone actually had an extemely faint true sky blue hue in the sun, that would be awesome. I think of "blue-white". Actually, I read somewhere that the true blue-whites were fluorescent at all but were colorless 1a class diamonds (not the 1a cut, but the purity category or something of the like) had just the faintest barely perceptible hint of sky blue body color that gave them a truly "icy white" look to them. The SB I saw should be called "violet-white". Other than the color in sunlight, it was an excellent stone.

You should get a very slight discount for med fluor in a stone of your color. Check out the site below to get an idea of discount range. I've found other such charts with higer discounts.

http://www.goodoldgold.com/fluorescence.htm

My personal experience with AGS ideal cuts is that they score excellent on HCA and have perfect arrows though not officially branded or purposely cut to be H&A or 8*. I was quite shocked to see such perfect arrows and near perfect light return on non-branded H&A stones when all the info on the web suggested otherwise. If you look at goodoldgold.com, the few ags000's they sell as non-branded H&A's looke rather pathetic which is contrary to my experience. The ags000's I saw at a B&M looked like their branded cuts. They weren't being sold as H&A either. The store doesn't even advertise such things. H&A, IMHO, is practically just another way of saying AGS000 (not counting that H&A doesn't necessarily mean good light return and that some AGS000 may have bad HCA scores and no visible arrows) and paying about the same premium.

BTW, Garry Holloway did a limited survey (not official) of a online seller of non-H&A and found that the around 70% of the AGS000 scored excellent on the HCA. Not suprising in light of my personal experience.
 

hoovillemd

Rough_Rock
Joined
Aug 11, 2002
Messages
50
Thank you so much for your info on my diamond hbright. I am going to check out that web-site as soon as possible.

Thanks,
Matt Dabney
 

nutterbutter

Rough_Rock
Joined
Dec 13, 2002
Messages
5
I'm also new the boards!

I just wanted to add my own two cents!

I just bought a GIA RB 1.02 E SI1 that has strong blue flourescence. While the diamond can appear light purple under direct sunlight, the diamond looks awesome in all other settings. Even in direct sunlight, the stone gives off some flashy color. I panicked when I first saw the cert., but the jewler let me take it outside with a stone that didn't have flourescence and I thought the stone I bought did a lot more "talking" than the one without flourescence.

When it comes to flourescence, I think it has to do with personal taste.

Sharon
 

golfer

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Oct 7, 2002
Messages
128
I concur wholeheartedly, and the e-ring I purchased last month (still not given to gf) is a 1.43 E VS1 with strong blue fluor. I see no reason not to pick fluor -- it makes the ring cheaper and is far more beautiful.
 

fire&ice

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jul 22, 2002
Messages
7,828
----------------
On 12/13/2002 3:51:46 PM

I concur wholeheartedly, and the e-ring I purchased last month (still not given to gf) is a 1.43 E VS1 with strong blue fluor. I see no reason not to pick fluor -- it makes the ring cheaper and is far more beautiful.
----------------


No argument here :wink2: :bigsmile: I went to a football game earlier this season. The sun was very strong. My friend turned to me and said my ring was glowing. It was.
 

The Gipper

Rough_Rock
Joined
Dec 13, 2002
Messages
19
I just looked at a 1.0 K/H/SI1 at a local B&M and they were asking $6345. No H&A, GIA cert with good measurements. So I would say you got a good deal. Was it through an internet site?
 

hoovillemd

Rough_Rock
Joined
Aug 11, 2002
Messages
50
I did not purchase my diamond on the internet. I live in a city called Charlottesville, Va. I bought it from a well known dealer named Biff McGuire. He owns a small shop called Harlan McGuire. Mr. McGuire's shop has the best deals and the great customer care I could find. His contact info is 1-(800)-476-0124. Tell him Matt Dabney says hello.

Thanks,
Matt Dabney
 

hbright

Rough_Rock
Joined
Nov 24, 2002
Messages
40
>

Correction: I forget the "not" in front of fluorescent. True blue-whites, according to some website, were NOT fluorescent, but had an actually faint blue body color.
 

Richard Sherwood

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Sep 25, 2002
Messages
4,924
Hi HBright. I would say that information you read is incorrect. Diamonds with even a "faint blue" body color are very rare. Much too rare to account for all the "blue white" sightings of old.

Most diamontaires seem to be in agreement that the "blue white" term originated with colorless diamonds with a strong blue fluorescence. In natural daylight these diamonds would exhibit a "blue white" appearance.

The term, however, began to degenerate through the years from overuse. Dealers began calling practically any white stone (and some not so white stones) "blue white" in an effort to "romance" the stone to a prospective buyer.

I believe the term has been "outlawed" by the FTC in the selling of diamonds today.

Rich, GG
Sarasota Gemological Laboratory
 

hbright

Rough_Rock
Joined
Nov 24, 2002
Messages
40
>

Thanks for that info Richard. Darn, I wish I could remember that site hosting the info. The website did not in any way suggest that faintest sky blue bodied type 1a diamonds actually comprised the majority of "blue white" sightings of old, but rather argued that such rare stones can be more aptly defined as "blue whites", more so that the traditional "blue fluorescent - whites" which were being called "blue white".

I thought the term "blue white" is okay if the stone is truly colorless and has blue fluor and/or a stone is really faintly blue in native color. Regardless, the term is too well stigmatized even for technically correct usage.
 

hoovillemd

Rough_Rock
Joined
Aug 11, 2002
Messages
50
So just because you have a D colored diamond with mediam blue fluorescence does not make it a (blue-white) or does it? What exactly makes a blue-white what it is?
Marry Christmas everyone

Thanks,
Matt Dabney
 

hbright

Rough_Rock
Joined
Nov 24, 2002
Messages
40
http://www.midwestgems.com/art6-20.html

Check out the link above and/or do a internet search for keywords "fluorescent diamonds", "blue white", etc.

Blue white, according to FTC is only to be used for diamonds with blue body color. I'm not sure if this applies to D color and blue fluor stone since it is "colorless" but the fluorescence can actually make it appear blue in sunlight, and thereby making it a blue diamond at least part of the time. It all depends on whether the FTC thinks a blue diamond is always blue or sometimes blue (I'm guessing the former is true). Regardless, the term is associated with "rip-off" so it is hardly used even correctly. It is thought that blue whites of old where colorless (D) rocks which had fluorescence and were considered creme de la creme. The term blue white, however, was abused by the trade (i.e. lower color diamonds with fluorescence were called "blue white" but where sold for the price of higher colors since they appeared to be whiter). So a D color, like yours, would have ONCE AGO been CORRECTLY blue white though it is probably not now allowable to called that (not sure here, since a colorless diamond with blue fluor can be blue sometimes).

Another website (can't remember where) argued that true blue whites were actually the everso faintly blue diamonds w/o fluor which were and are quite rare. This definition is what the FTC seems to be holding to currently.

BTW, does the diamond look bluish in direct sun? Do you like it?
 

hoovillemd

Rough_Rock
Joined
Aug 11, 2002
Messages
50
The diamond is the most amazing diamond I could find for the price I had to spend. As for the blue color in the light Im not sure. I am going to look at the diamond again this friday so I will get back to everyone on if it gives of a blue tent in the sunlight. Thanks again for all of your help.
Happy Hollidays
From,
Matt Dabney
 
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