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Manufacturing Defects

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pyramid

Ideal_Rock
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The company my ring was bought from guarantees against manufacturing defects.

I have discovered the girdle on my diamond is ''very thin'' in two small places, would this be considered a manufacturing defect?

Could as many experts as possible please reply here?

I want to know the facts before I bring that to their attention.
 

dimonbob

Brilliant_Rock
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Hello Pyramid;

The ring company I am sure is talking about the ring (metal) not the diamond.

Oh, by the way a very thin girdle is not a manufacturing defect in a diamond. An extremely thin girdle is not a recommended girdle but even that is not a defect.

A chip in a diamond in a ring might give you wiggle room to complain but not either of the two above.

Sorry!
 

pyramid

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Thank you Diamondbob for your reply.


If customers are told a girdle may chip where it is too thin, why is it not a defect?

If something else is sold and part of it is too thin it would be a defect. This is detrimental to the life of the stone is it not? It is a flaw in the cutting part of the four C's so why is it not a defect due to durability factors. A large table may affect light but not the diamond, large angled slopes may affect light but not the diamond. How can cutters get away with this.

As this store sells rings with diamonds in them and all other jewelry I assumed the manufacturers guarantee covers everything that is manufactured including stones which are cut be they diamonds or other gemstones.

Also with thin parts on a girdle which is most of the way medium it will make the stone unsymmetrical will it not and look lopsided if out of the ring mount?

Anyone who can advise on this please feel free to do so.
 

pyramid

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Correct me if I am wrong but if a plate say is chipped the thinner edge is likely to break further so a diamond with a very thin girdle, although not chipped, would be the same when looking at it in comparison to a medium girdle at each side of the very thin section in the middle would it not?
 

Hest88

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I agree with Dimonbob. I would bet money that they just mean the ring and not the diamond. You can argue it semantically, but no one talks about manufacturing defects when it comes to diamonds.
 

dimonbob

Brilliant_Rock
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Hello again Pyramid,

Think about this: All marquise and princess cut diamonds have very sharp cornors on them. These sharp corners can chip fairly easily compared to the rounded or flat edge. These corners chip with more frequency than do thin girdles. So are all marquise and princess cut diamonds defective? When you buy a car, you kick the tires. When you buy a house, you check out everything and hire someone else to check it out. When you buy a diamond ring, you should find out about what you are buying before you lay down your money and then get a knowledgable gemologist appraiser to check it out and give you the straight information. You can take it back within a reasonable length of time.

If a medium girdle has a very thin section, that does not make the stone unsymmetrical nor lopsided. The thin section of the girdle was caused by the shape of the VERY EXPENSIVE rough and the cutter was trying to get as much out of the rough as possible so he could make a few bucks. If he takes too much diamond off in the cutting process, he ends up with a very expensive diamond that nobody is willing to pay for and he could be out of business. It is not against the law nor unethical to cut a diamond with even an extremely thin girdle.

If you think you will chip your diamond, you probably will. Therefore you should go buy some insurance for loss, theft and damage.
 

Heyjud

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Feb 26, 2003
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I agree with Dimonbob
They say - let the buyer beware
Arm yourself with knowledge
and pick that stone with care.

When you need advice
At the end of your rope
The best place to ask
Is here in PriceScope!

 

hsanchez

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Jan 5, 2004
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What about the jeweler's responsibility insofar as the setting? Since the jeweler knows that marquise and other special cut diamonds are likely to chip in the thin areas, isn't there some standard that requires the jeweler to use an appropriate setting that would protect those thin areas?

Likewise, on a stone with a thin girdle, since the jeweler knows of the thin girdle and the likelihood that it will chip, isn't there a standard which requires a jeweler to use an appropriate setting for such a stone, which will provide greater protection for the thin girdle?

Also, shouldn't the jeweler warn the customer that the thin girdle could chip and therefore, such a diamond is not a good stone to wear every day, because normal wear and tear will likely result in a chip?
 

pyramid

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I found this old post. Whatever happened to Heyjud, notice the last posting was in 2004. I used to quite enjoy all these rhymes he/she came up with.
 

pyramid

Ideal_Rock
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Just a thought. When I posted on this post that I had thought a very thin part on a girdle which is mostly medium would make the diamond lopsided ofcourse Diamonbob corrected me on this about the expensive rought the diamond is cut from. This is what too much scrutinizing does to uneducated consumers.

Well as I said just a thought, what has crossed my mind is remember how Fred Cuellar said that diamonds were warped is this not what he is meaning? I have never understood what he meant by warped = does anyone know? I know a diamond cannot be warped but what was his logic on this (if he did believe it) apart from trying to get consumers to all buy from him as only he had ''perfect'' diamonds?
 

pyramid

Ideal_Rock
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Date: 1/6/2004 12:00:38 PM
Author: hsanchez
What about the jeweler's responsibility insofar as the setting? Since the jeweler knows that marquise and other special cut diamonds are likely to chip in the thin areas, isn't there some standard that requires the jeweler to use an appropriate setting that would protect those thin areas?

Likewise, on a stone with a thin girdle, since the jeweler knows of the thin girdle and the likelihood that it will chip, isn't there a standard which requires a jeweler to use an appropriate setting for such a stone, which will provide greater protection for the thin girdle?

Also, shouldn't the jeweler warn the customer that the thin girdle could chip and therefore, such a diamond is not a good stone to wear every day, because normal wear and tear will likely result in a chip?
I would be interested in professional opinions to this question which was posted a while ago when in reference to Very Thin girdle width?
 
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