Find your diamond
Find your jewelry
shape
carat
color
clarity

Is Palladium a Good Alternative?

Status
Not open for further replies. Please create a new topic or request for this thread to be opened.

alia

Rough_Rock
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
10
Given the current economic circumstances, palladium is certainly looking like an attractive option to me. What are the differences between platinum and palladium? Can you actually tell them apart with the naked eye?

I''ve been looking at this ring: http://www.platin-ice.com/OnlineShop.aspx?PId=192 - choosing palladium cuts the price almost by half. Obviously palladium costs a lot less, but why is that? Is there a difference in durability?
 

Imdanny

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 21, 2008
Messages
6,186
Yes, you can tell them apart with your eye (well, I can). Palladium is slightly more grey, if that makes sense. I actually the look of it better than platinum.

They are in the same family, so they look very much like each other. As far as platinum being more "prestigious," that's just nonsense.

The main difference (to me) is the weight. You can see on a list of specific gravity (sorry, don't have a link just now) that platinum (due to alloys used and the amount by weight that is used as alloy, as opposed to the amount of alloy in gold, mainly) is the heaviest option.

18kt yellow gold is next. 18kt white gold. Then 14 kt yellow gold, etc. This is not exact, just a general outline of how the chart reads.

Palladium is about as heavy as 14 kt gold. It's in that area somewhere. I think I remember it's just slightly less heavy than 14kt white gold.

That's a deal killer for me, but that's just me! I don't see any reason not to consider it (I considered it).

I'll let someone else speak about its price (I think it has been higher per ounce than platinum in the past-- I don't know what affects its price today).

I'll let someone else speak about its durability. I have no first hand knowledge of that, and I really don't know how to answer that. Good luck!
 

Imdanny

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 21, 2008
Messages
6,186
I found the chart. Here you go.


http://www.18carat.co.uk/densityofgoldandothermetals.html
 

oldmancoyote

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Aug 22, 2008
Messages
755
Date: 3/16/2009 5:49:01 AM
Author: Imdanny
Yes, you can tell them apart with your eye (well, I can). Palladium is slightly more grey, if that makes sense. I actually the look of it better than platinum.

They are in the same family, so they look very much like each other. As far as platinum being more ''prestigious,'' that''s just nonsense.

The main difference (to me) is the weight. You can see on a list of specific gravity (sorry, don''t have a link just now) that platinum (due to alloys used and the amount by weight that is used as alloy, as opposed to the amount of alloy in gold, mainly) is the heaviest option.

18kt yellow gold is next. 18kt white gold. Then 14 kt yellow gold, etc. This is not exact, just a general outline of how the chart reads.

Palladium is about as heavy as 14 kt gold. It''s in that area somewhere. I think I remember it''s just slightly less heavy than 14kt white gold.

That''s a deal killer for me, but that''s just me! I don''t see any reason not to consider it (I considered it).

I''ll let someone else speak about its price (I think it has been higher per ounce than platinum in the past-- I don''t know what affects its price today).

I''ll let someone else speak about its durability. I have no first hand knowledge of that, and I really don''t know how to answer that. Good luck!
I beg to disagree on the highlighted point. Platinum is more common than palladium in the earth crust (although slightly more expensive to extract), but it has been chosen consistently in modern times (1900 ->) for some of the most important pieces of jewellery, whereas palladium seems to surface as a fashionable substitute in times of economic troubles or platinum scarcity. Whether all of this amounts to "more prestige" is debatable, but it points to the fact that the image of platinum is considerably higher than that of palladium.

Palladium is also the most reactive of the platinum metals group - although it''s still by and large non-reactive, greater precautions need to be taken to avoid oxidization and joint failure when using palladium than with gold and platinum. Casting and fabrication require specific knowledge which is less widespread than for platinum or gold.

Re: prices: apart from a speculative spike in 1999-2000, palladium has been consistently priced less than platinum from the early 1980s because of lower demand for industrial and jewellery uses.

Durability-wise, palladium alloys have similar properties (hardness, lack of elastic memory, behaviour on scratching/impact) to platinum, so there shouldn''t be issues there.
 

geckodani

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jun 25, 2008
Messages
8,896
My wedding ring and engagement ring are palladium, and I love them! Here''s a pic I took a while back of palladium next to platinum and white gold:

 

Imdanny

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 21, 2008
Messages
6,186
Date: 3/16/2009 10:11:41 AM
Author: oldmancoyote
Date: 3/16/2009 5:49:01 AM

Author: Imdanny

Yes, you can tell them apart with your eye (well, I can). Palladium is slightly more grey, if that makes sense. I actually the look of it better than platinum.


They are in the same family, so they look very much like each other. As far as platinum being more 'prestigious,' that's just nonsense.


The main difference (to me) is the weight. You can see on a list of specific gravity (sorry, don't have a link just now) that platinum (due to alloys used and the amount by weight that is used as alloy, as opposed to the amount of alloy in gold, mainly) is the heaviest option.


18kt yellow gold is next. 18kt white gold. Then 14 kt yellow gold, etc. This is not exact, just a general outline of how the chart reads.


Palladium is about as heavy as 14 kt gold. It's in that area somewhere. I think I remember it's just slightly less heavy than 14kt white gold.


That's a deal killer for me, but that's just me! I don't see any reason not to consider it (I considered it).


I'll let someone else speak about its price (I think it has been higher per ounce than platinum in the past-- I don't know what affects its price today).


I'll let someone else speak about its durability. I have no first hand knowledge of that, and I really don't know how to answer that. Good luck!
I beg to disagree on the highlighted point. Platinum is more common than palladium in the earth crust (although slightly more expensive to extract), but it has been chosen consistently in modern times (1900 ->) for some of the most important pieces of jewellery, whereas palladium seems to surface as a fashionable substitute in times of economic troubles or platinum scarcity. Whether all of this amounts to 'more prestige' is debatable, but it points to the fact that the image of platinum is considerably higher than that of palladium.


Palladium is also the most reactive of the platinum metals group - although it's still by and large non-reactive, greater precautions need to be taken to avoid oxidization and joint failure when using palladium than with gold and platinum. Casting and fabrication require specific knowledge which is less widespread than for platinum or gold.


Re: prices: apart from a speculative spike in 1999-2000, palladium has been consistently priced less than platinum from the early 1980s because of lower demand for industrial and jewellery uses.


Durability-wise, palladium alloys have similar properties (hardness, lack of elastic memory, behaviour on scratching/impact) to platinum, so there shouldn't be issues there.
Well, I was just trying to say that they are both metals of the same family, so any import we give to "prestige" is a little ironic, since they are *almost* the same thing. Do you think that platinum is more prestigious than gold? You do know that that argument (whether platinum is more prestigious than gold) goes both ways? (No, I'm not being rhetorical, I'd like to hear your thoughts on this question).

What I actually wanted to say was a consumer should consider the properties and uses of the two metals for her or himself, without being as concerned about platinum being more famous. That's really all I was trying to say.
 

Imdanny

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 21, 2008
Messages
6,186
Date: 3/16/2009 11:51:38 AM
Author: geckodani
My wedding ring and engagement ring are palladium, and I love them! Here''s a pic I took a while back of palladium next to platinum and white gold:


So can I ask you: do you mean it''s groupings of rings with the first two being palladium, etc?

Why do the palladium have less patina? Are they just newer? (I know it''s a harder surface (I think I remember) - but is it *that* much harder? It looks great!
 

musey

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Sep 30, 2006
Messages
11,242
Gecko, what a wonderful comparison shot! Thank you for posting that! I really love the look of your palladium. The slightly darker cast appeals to me.
 

oldmancoyote

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Aug 22, 2008
Messages
755
Date: 3/16/2009 6:48:34 PM
Author: Imdanny

Well, I was just trying to say that they are both metals of the same family, so any import we give to 'prestige' is a little ironic, since they are *almost* the same thing. Do you think that platinum is more prestigious than gold? You do know that that argument (whether platinum is more prestigious than gold) goes both ways? (No, I'm not being rhetorical, I'd like to hear your thoughts on this question).

What I actually wanted to say was a consumer should consider the properties and uses of the two metals for her or himself, without being as concerned about platinum being more famous. That's really all I was trying to say.
They are "almost" the same thing as much as gold and silver are "almost" the same thing. Just look at any periodic table of the elements, and you'll see that the relationship between palladium and platinum is exactly the same (in periodic table terms) as that between silver and gold. Yet I don't think anyone has ever considered silver "as prestigious" as gold.

As far as prestige (standing or estimation in the eyes of people : weight or credit in general opinion - Merriam Webster) goes, I'd say that the prestige of gold and platinum has waxed and waned through the ages. Currently in the West - and from about the 1920s - platinum enjoys at least equal prestige with gold, and possibly higher. Go back 120 years, and platinum wasn't considered fit for jewellery, to the point that many diamonds were set in silver; so much for "prestige". Go back to the 1500s, and the newly-found platinum was considered of so little worth that it was not extracted or collected by the conquistadores ("platino": little silver in Spanish) who exploited South America for gold and silver. My guess is that today in many cultures that value fine gold, platinum is seen as relatively worthless or at any rate of far less consideration than gold. Palladium - as far as I know - enjoys little prestige in any culture.

Is it a valid reason to prefer one metal to the other? Possibly, and possibly not - is a blue (or red) box a valid reason to justify a 15, 20 or 50% premium price compared to a non-branded item with the same basic quality? Yes, for many; not for some. However, thanks to the prestige of its brand, a Tiffany or Cartier item will be more easily recognised, valued (and - perish the thought - re-sold) than a functionally equivalent unbranded piece.

In other words - I agree with you that people should evaluate materials to some extent independently of their fame, reputation or prestige. But then, luxury items such as jewellery are also about fame, reputation and prestige. Otherwise, one might as well suggest stainless steel with a lead core - which to all practical intents and purposes is a very good functional replacement for palladium (platinum is still heavier
), but many times cheaper.
 

Imdanny

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 21, 2008
Messages
6,186
Date: 3/16/2009 8:34:47 PM
Author: oldmancoyote
Date: 3/16/2009 6:48:34 PM

Author: Imdanny


Well, I was just trying to say that they are both metals of the same family, so any import we give to 'prestige' is a little ironic, since they are *almost* the same thing. Do you think that platinum is more prestigious than gold? You do know that that argument (whether platinum is more prestigious than gold) goes both ways? (No, I'm not being rhetorical, I'd like to hear your thoughts on this question).


What I actually wanted to say was a consumer should consider the properties and uses of the two metals for her or himself, without being as concerned about platinum being more famous. That's really all I was trying to say.
They are 'almost' the same thing as much as gold and silver are 'almost' the same thing. Just look at any periodic table of the elements, and you'll see that the relationship between palladium and platinum is exactly the same (in periodic table terms) as that between silver and gold. Yet I don't think anyone has ever considered silver 'as prestigious' as gold.


As far as prestige (standing or estimation in the eyes of people : weight or credit in general opinion - Merriam Webster) goes, I'd say that the prestige of gold and platinum has waxed and waned through the ages. Currently in the West - and from about the 1920s - platinum enjoys at least equal prestige with gold, and possibly higher. Go back 120 years, and platinum wasn't considered fit for jewellery, to the point that many diamonds were set in silver; so much for 'prestige'. Go back to the 1500s, and the newly-found platinum was considered of so little worth that it was not extracted or collected by the conquistadores ('platino': little silver in Spanish) who exploited South America for gold and silver. My guess is that today in many cultures that value fine gold, platinum is seen as relatively worthless or at any rate of far less consideration than gold. Palladium - as far as I know - enjoys little prestige in any culture.


Is it a valid reason to prefer one metal to the other? Possibly, and possibly not - is a blue (or red) box a valid reason to justify a 15, 20 or 50% premium price compared to a non-branded item with the same basic quality?
I'll disagree with you on this point, and bow out of this thread. There are many, many Cartier and VCA pieces that cannot be and aren't replicated to any "basic" level of equivalence by others. And there are differences between the Cartier 1895 settings and copies of it, and differences between the original Tiffany setting and copies of it. I could hold my breath, cover my ears, close my eyes, and sigh. It wouldn't change the the fact. What do you mean by "basic" quality? "Basically the same design and made out of the same metal"? Well, you're welcome to your definition of "basic."

I've always heard that palladium is a platinum group metal. It that statement has no real meaning, I blame the people who told me that.
 

kjt

Rough_Rock
Joined
Oct 30, 2008
Messages
94
Yes, palladium is a great alternative to platinum.

My engagement ring and wedding band are both platinum, but last year, I got a micro pave diamond band made from palladium. The metal cost significantly less, and I was able to get a metal that didnt turn yellow as I knew white gold would have (I have several white gold rings and most of them have turned yellow quickly).

I am very happy with the choice that I have made, and in the future, will consider it. The only drawback is that I like to feel the weight of my rings, and the palladium doesnt give that. However, I think the significant price drop more than makes up for it.

Happy shopping!
 

oldmancoyote

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Aug 22, 2008
Messages
755
Date: 3/16/2009 10:24:07 PM
Author: Imdanny
I''ve always heard that palladium is a platinum group metal. It that statement has no real meaning, I blame the people who told me that.
It doesn''t have the meaning you attribute to it.
 

geckodani

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jun 25, 2008
Messages
8,896
Date: 3/16/2009 6:51:59 PM
Author: Imdanny

Date: 3/16/2009 11:51:38 AM
Author: geckodani
My wedding ring and engagement ring are palladium, and I love them! Here''s a pic I took a while back of palladium next to platinum and white gold:


So can I ask you: do you mean it''s groupings of rings with the first two being palladium, etc?

Why do the palladium have less patina? Are they just newer? (I know it''s a harder surface (I think I remember) - but is it *that* much harder? It looks great!
Yup, the 2 on the left are my palladium ering and a plain band, next are my sister''s platinum ering and band, and the third set are actually white gold hoops, but you get the idea.

Palladium doesn''t patina the way that platinum does. I''ve had my rings since October, and while I''ve managed to knick it in a few places (I''m a klutz) other than the two I''ve inflicted on it, it''s still crazy shiny! I love that about my settings.

I can try to take some updated pics, if you''d like.
I''ll be near my sis in a few weeks too, and although she''ll think me mad, I can try to pry her rings off again and take more, LOL, if you like.

The Palladium does seem to be quite hard. I''ve also got a polishing cloth that can polish out minor scuffs. My sister has had her rings for 5 years, and to my knowledge had them repolished about 2 years ago.
 

geckodani

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jun 25, 2008
Messages
8,896
Date: 3/16/2009 7:44:34 PM
Author: musey
Gecko, what a wonderful comparison shot! Thank you for posting that! I really love the look of your palladium. The slightly darker cast appeals to me.
Thanks Musey! I like it too! Its's funny though, it's so shiny and reflective that in certain light it actually looks warm - because it's reflecting the peachy pink of my skin! LOL!
 

Imdanny

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 21, 2008
Messages
6,186
Date: 3/17/2009 12:31:58 PM
Author: geckodani
Date: 3/16/2009 6:51:59 PM

Author: Imdanny


Date: 3/16/2009 11:51:38 AM

Author: geckodani

My wedding ring and engagement ring are palladium, and I love them! Here's a pic I took a while back of palladium next to platinum and white gold:




So can I ask you: do you mean it's groupings of rings with the first two being palladium, etc?


Why do the palladium have less patina? Are they just newer? (I know it's a harder surface (I think I remember) - but is it *that* much harder? It looks great!

Yup, the 2 on the left are my palladium ering and a plain band, next are my sister's platinum ering and band, and the third set are actually white gold hoops, but you get the idea.


Palladium doesn't patina the way that platinum does. I've had my rings since October, and while I've managed to knick it in a few places (I'm a klutz) other than the two I've inflicted on it, it's still crazy shiny! I love that about my settings.


I can try to take some updated pics, if you'd like.
Yes, please do, take more pictures of the palladium rings that is. Bother your sister, too, if you want, LOL! This is very intriguing to me. I confess-- I like shiny metal. I'm not too much into patina. Urg! I wish some of my favorite rings were even offered in palladium rather than only platinum and 18kt.
 

geckodani

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jun 25, 2008
Messages
8,896
Date: 3/17/2009 10:06:26 PM
Author: Imdanny

Yes, please do, take more pictures of the palladium rings that is. Bother your sister, too, if you want, LOL! This is very intriguing to me. I confess-- I like shiny metal. I''m not too much into patina. Urg! I wish some of my favorite rings were even offered in palladium rather than only platinum and 18kt.
LOL - I''ll see what I can do this weekend. There are more in the thread where I got my bezel band (also palladium
). https://www.pricescope.com/community/threads/whiteflash-adwar-bezel-band-has-arrived.100955/

I believe Gypsy''s new pendant is going to be made in palladium, so there will be a new palladium lovely to ogle soon!
 

Chicago

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jul 20, 2007
Messages
117
I have an antique wedding set cast in palladium that I absolutely love, the only complaint I have is that it''s difficult to find jewelers who work with that metal. This could be problematic should you need a reset or sizing.
 
Status
Not open for further replies. Please create a new topic or request for this thread to be opened.
Be a part of the community It's free, join today!
    Style File: Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge
    Style File: Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge
    Diamond Prices - January 2021
    Diamond Prices - January 2021
    The Magic of Pink and Blue Diamonds
    The Magic of Pink and Blue Diamonds

Need Something Special?

Get a quote from multiple trusted and vetted jewelers.

Holloway Cut Advisor



Diamond Eye Candy

Click to view full-size image.
Top