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Is it possible for a J to face up white?

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SwanSong

Rough_Rock
Joined
Feb 6, 2003
Messages
82
I know this is somewhat of a suubjective question...but has anyone seen an I or J color Round face up white in a platinum setting.

Carat 1.75 +
Platnium setting
Ideal Cut
Very high on Brilliance Scope for white lite return.

I woudl like to get your thoughts,

Thank You,

T
 

pricescope

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Dec 31, 1999
Messages
8,266
SwanSong, J diamond is still near colorless. I don't think it will look bad in normal conditions unless you compare it with G or higher side by side.
 

fire&ice

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jul 22, 2002
Messages
7,828
My stone is an I w/ med/strong bl. fluor. It is set in a platinum setting w/ f/g baguettes.

That said, I have seen "I" w/ a bit of body color showing face up. I/J can be tricky. A good cut helps as well as some med/strong blue fluor.

Let your eyes be the judge. Some people are more sensitive to color.
 

mattinSD

Rough_Rock
Joined
Feb 11, 2003
Messages
23
I'm very happy with the J color center stone in a platinum setting that I purchased for my girls e-ring... I think it faces up fairly white, but I'm not that sensitive to color.

on key.jpg
 

Hest88

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 22, 2003
Messages
4,357
I've seen "I" stones that face up white, but they have to be very well cut so that the sparkle and play of light really masks the color. I've seen badly cut J colors set in yellow gold that were unmistakably yellow.

If the diamond is well-cut, I doubt most people will know it's not a D when it's set. Most people don't hold two diamonds next to each other to compare anyway.
 

liz

Rough_Rock
Joined
Dec 13, 2002
Messages
100
My stone is an I with faint fluoresence and it faces up very white. Under certain lighting conditions I can detect a touch of warmth in it from the pavillion, but personally, I like that. With well-cut I-J stones what you're really seeing is "warmth" rather than color, and this distinction can only be made when viewing the stone from the side or bottom and against a white background.
 

gemsource

Rough_Rock
Joined
Mar 11, 2003
Messages
48
everyone keeps repeating j is white.maybe so.i have many j stones w/certs to me they look yellow tinted.i ask anyone they look and say white.now two things either im seeing something no one else sees or they see something i dont.
j is a nice color i like
 

gemsource

Rough_Rock
Joined
Mar 11, 2003
Messages
48
to hest88 is that a tsavorite?next to your name?i was looking at the green stone
 

Hest88

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 22, 2003
Messages
4,357
----------------
On 3/11/2003 8
6:38 PM gemsource wrote:

to hest88 is that a tsavorite?next to your name?
----------------
No. Actually a demantoid. Still a garnet, though.
 

TheDiamondangel

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Mar 12, 2003
Messages
239
Keep in mind that the larger the stone, the more likely you are to see body color. However, a well cut stone will look better than a stone of same carat weight but poor cut. I happen to love J stones..the warmth is very appealing.
 

stoneseeker123

Rough_Rock
Joined
Mar 12, 2003
Messages
3
Newbie lurker here. Over 4/5 months NEVER seen anyone who has an off top range (G-J) colour stone say it faces up anything other than perfectly white. But everyone who has top-range (D-F) says they can tell the difference. Make of that what you will. Go with personal inspection - if you like, buy!
 

djr59

Rough_Rock
Joined
Jan 31, 2003
Messages
13
People like to refer to I and J stones as warm or having warmth? Wel I am looking at a I color stone and I guess I am not not sure what you be by warm? Do you mean it shows color? So, my questions is, what is meant by warmth? I know it won't keep me warm at night, but she will if she likes her ring !!!!!!!!!
 

liz

Rough_Rock
Joined
Dec 13, 2002
Messages
100
In my opinion, "warmth" refers not to the color but to the tone of the diamond. Consider for example a sepia-toned photograph next to B&W photograph with regular silver emulsion. The tone of the sepia photograph is "warm" (could be downright brown depending on how long the print sat in the toner bath), whereas the regular B&W photo has various gradations of black and white with many grey tones in between, giving the photo an overall "silver" tone.

In diamonds, what is meant by "warmth" can best be seen when looking at an I-J stone next to a D-E stone. You will see (if viewing the stones from the pavillion against a white background) that the D-E stones appear "icy" or "cold" and the I-J stones appear "warm." Again, this is not color you're seeing, but tone. My understanding is that when dealing with well-cut rounds, color (in the conventional sense) doesn't really start showing up until you get to lower letters of the Faint Tint range, L and M for example.

I'm not an expert by any means, but I've looked at stones in all color ranges, and I've seen the differences with my own eyes. The only way to know what's accpetable for you is to do the same.
 
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