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India: International Distribution Problems

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strmrdr

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Interesting article.
As the current international meltdown shows depending on international trade instead of building a home market can be very painful.



Much of the success of the distribution model in the US owes its existence to the Interstate Highway System.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstate_Highway_System
As this map shows from just a few distribution points reachable by train you can reach the entire continental US in a day to a day and a half at low cost.
Form there you can speed up and extend the network using air travel.

mapInterstatehighways.jpg
 

John Pollard

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3,559
Thanks for the article Garry and Mahek.

Deliveries and returns over international borders can be thorny, really for good reason with diamonds.

Blue Nile established a physical presence in Canada and the UK to facilitate ease-of-use. For other international destinations a healthy page of restrictions, added insurance and emphasis on customer responsibilities beyond their control shows we're not quite "one world" yet (maybe 5 consecutive nights of Bono on Letterman will help).

Interesting that Mexico is on BN's international service list - wire-transfer only - but India is not.
 

raviramani

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This is quite an interesting article. I have been lurking around for sometime but after reading this article I had to say something. India has made tremendous progress since the mid 90''s after opening up for globalization. It still has decades more to go. The infrastructure as compared to most western countries is still in it''s infancy. It simply cannot cope with the growth in population. Broadband internet services are not at all reliable no matter which company you choose. VOIP services have made it easy to make and receive phone calls. However, everyone in the US has had a bad connection phone call with a call center in New Delhi, let alone the accent barrier.

Customer''s in today''s world and especially in this down economy are trying to save as much as possible. However, buying diamonds directly from India would definitely not be a good solution. Returns as mentioned in the article is way too complicated. Additionally most consumers don''t realize that there is a 6% import charges on finished jewelry including engagement rings. Not much of savings if you add shipping charges.

I tried to move my operations to Bombay last year for family reasons and failed miserably. Simply could not cope with the business and work culture anymore. Long lines everywhere from the postal service to banks! I will never forget, getting something as trivial as banker''s check in an internationally known bank took over an hour. The customs authorities have NO regard for privacy, rules or regulations. I bought a laptop as a gift and shipped it to Bombay. They opened up the package rummaged through the entire packaging in customs and charged me 25%. The laptop was was purchased at $500, valued by the customs internal sheet at $700. It cost me an additional $240 ($175 customs and $65 bribe) because customs would not release it despite all legal and correct paperwork. It was either pay up or shut up.
The competition from new international sources actually arises predominantly from Dubai, UAE rather than directly from India. Dubai unlike Indian borders is a free trade zone. They have no income or sales tax (last I checked). They have stringent rules, regulations and respect for the law. Dubai is only a 4 hr flight from Bombay. It is a well planned city, great infrastructure and organized. It''s entire concept is based on the US way of life.

If Indian diamantaires and the cutting houses want to compete with the international online retail market, it would require an overhaul of government policies, red tapism and a turnaround in the attitude of all the hands that are involved in the sales process. That in itself is at least a generation! They will have to invest heavily in training, experience of the western world, customer service expectations with quick turnarounds and a multitude of issues. Additionally, what would their existing retail store customers think of their online venture!

To add to all this, I am an Indian, born and raised in Bombay. I spent my early diamond learning days in the Bombay (Mumbai) Diamond Bourse. Came to study at GIA in 2000 and been in the US ever since. Never in my wildest dreams did I think that I would be writing in a pessismistic manner about my motherland. There is a lot of potential, hope and optimism about India but it will take revolutionary changes. It''s a world in a world!!!
 

Garry H (Cut Nut)

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Date: 2/21/2009 12:14:35 AM
Author: raviramani
This is quite an interesting article. I have been lurking around for sometime but after reading this article I had to say something. India has made tremendous progress since the mid 90''s after opening up for globalization. It still has decades more to go. The infrastructure as compared to most western countries is still in it''s infancy. It simply cannot cope with the growth in population. Broadband internet services are not at all reliable no matter which company you choose. VOIP services have made it easy to make and receive phone calls. However, everyone in the US has had a bad connection phone call with a call center in New Delhi, let alone the accent barrier.

Customer''s in today''s world and especially in this down economy are trying to save as much as possible. However, buying diamonds directly from India would definitely not be a good solution. Returns as mentioned in the article is way too complicated. Additionally most consumers don''t realize that there is a 6% import charges on finished jewelry including engagement rings. Not much of savings if you add shipping charges.

I tried to move my operations to Bombay last year for family reasons and failed miserably. Simply could not cope with the business and work culture anymore. Long lines everywhere from the postal service to banks! I will never forget, getting something as trivial as banker''s check in an internationally known bank took over an hour. The customs authorities have NO regard for privacy, rules or regulations. I bought a laptop as a gift and shipped it to Bombay. They opened up the package rummaged through the entire packaging in customs and charged me 25%. The laptop was was purchased at $500, valued by the customs internal sheet at $700. It cost me an additional $240 ($175 customs and $65 bribe) because customs would not release it despite all legal and correct paperwork. It was either pay up or shut up.
The competition from new international sources actually arises predominantly from Dubai, UAE rather than directly from India. Dubai unlike Indian borders is a free trade zone. They have no income or sales tax (last I checked). They have stringent rules, regulations and respect for the law. Dubai is only a 4 hr flight from Bombay. It is a well planned city, great infrastructure and organized. It''s entire concept is based on the US way of life.

If Indian diamantaires and the cutting houses want to compete with the international online retail market, it would require an overhaul of government policies, red tapism and a turnaround in the attitude of all the hands that are involved in the sales process. That in itself is at least a generation! They will have to invest heavily in training, experience of the western world, customer service expectations with quick turnarounds and a multitude of issues. Additionally, what would their existing retail store customers think of their online venture!

To add to all this, I am an Indian, born and raised in Bombay. I spent my early diamond learning days in the Bombay (Mumbai) Diamond Bourse. Came to study at GIA in 2000 and been in the US ever since. Never in my wildest dreams did I think that I would be writing in a pessismistic manner about my motherland. There is a lot of potential, hope and optimism about India but it will take revolutionary changes. It''s a world in a world!!!
Thank you Ravi,
Your experiances tell a story of bueracracy challeneged by rapid commercial growth.

I do however believe that India will pull through. My friend Sanjay Kothari and the GEJPC (trade body) have made major advances and the govt does listen to them and make small steps forward.

But what do you think about the internal diamond e-tailing and retailing scene inside India for the locals?
We have seen over the years posts from expat Indians attempting to buy diamonds on trips back home and them finding it is a little like an Afghani mine field.
 

mac-vision

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Joined
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Messages
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Date: 2/21/2009 1:47:55 AM
Author: Garry H (Cut Nut)
Date: 2/21/2009 12:14:35 AM

Author: raviramani
Customer''s in today''s world and especially in this down economy are trying to save as much as possible. However, buying diamonds directly from India would definitely not be a good solution. Returns as mentioned in the article is way too complicated. Additionally most consumers don''t realize that there is a 6% import charges on finished jewelry including engagement rings. Not much of savings if you add shipping charges.


I tried to move my operations to Bombay last year for family reasons and failed miserably. Simply could not cope with the business and work culture anymore. Long lines everywhere from the postal service to banks! I will never forget, getting something as trivial as banker''s check in an internationally known bank took over an hour. The customs authorities have NO regard for privacy, rules or regulations. I bought a laptop as a gift and shipped it to Bombay. They opened up the package rummaged through the entire packaging in customs and charged me 25%. The laptop was was purchased at $500, valued by the customs internal sheet at $700. It cost me an additional $240 ($175 customs and $65 bribe) because customs would not release it despite all legal and correct paperwork. It was either pay up or shut up.
The competition from new international sources actually arises predominantly from Dubai, UAE rather than directly from India. Dubai unlike Indian borders is a free trade zone. They have no income or sales tax (last I checked). They have stringent rules, regulations and respect for the law. Dubai is only a 4 hr flight from Bombay. It is a well planned city, great infrastructure and organized. It''s entire concept is based on the US way of life.

To add to all this, I am an Indian, born and raised in Bombay. I spent my early diamond learning days in the Bombay (Mumbai) Diamond Bourse. Came to study at GIA in 2000 and been in the US ever since. Never in my wildest dreams did I think that I would be writing in a pessismistic manner about my motherland. There is a lot of potential, hope and optimism about India but it will take revolutionary changes. It''s a world in a world!!!
Thank you Ravi,

Your experiances tell a story of bueracracy challeneged by rapid commercial growth.


I do however believe that India will pull through. My friend Sanjay Kothari and the GEJPC (trade body) have made major advances and the govt does listen to them and make small steps forward.


But what do you think about the internal diamond e-tailing and retailing scene inside India for the locals?

We have seen over the years posts from expat Indians attempting to buy diamonds on trips back home and them finding it is a little like an Afghani mine field.
You are right ravi that there are lot of costs associated to the import of the diamonds in India that is all to promote more and more exports in other parts of the world. If they liberate the laws of importing diamonds, local brands may find it difficult to survive. Govt. still does not thinks that Indian brands are ready to cope-up with international brands may be.

However, there are lot reformation that have occured in India in terms of penetration in web-world, services and etc. Few years back online money transfers were a hassle but it is very comfortable now. all banks are going online and try to finish all sort of work online. for e.g. ABN AMRO provide service to pick the check from your place itself, no issues of big tiring ques.
Internet connections are getting better and better. The services are also improved a lot. I have lived overseas for two years and i don''t feel that i am missing out something in India.


In India, most importantly you have to be aware of your rights and you can make your way through. still i dont say things are very easy but are imporving.

Currently, I beleive all the diamond companies are eyeing on the Indian consumer market which will grow.
 

raviramani

Rough_Rock
Joined
Jan 28, 2009
Messages
4
Hello Garry,

But what do you think about the internal diamond e-tailing and retailing scene inside India for the locals?
India was one of the first countries that joined the E-Comm bandwagon. I remember websites like tsnshop.com, indiaonline.com, indya.com, etc which had a yahoo stores kind of format. The one thing they lacked were proper safety measures for the payment gateways. Needless to say some of them got took over, dropped their online sales dept. or shut down. Payment Gateways have improved over the years, however I don''t know to what extent.

E-Tailing within the borders will be a tough but profitable venture. Just like every other place on the planet Brand Building & Brand Awareness is the most important aspect along with Consumer Targeting. It will be easier to make early progress in the major cities where majority of the population is educated and savvy. Sustainability and expansion would be much tougher. I think the better way for Indian Diamond Houses moving forward would be to partner with international brands. It was an early concept that was used with the car industry. International brands must partner with Indian conglomerates to build a presence. It''s an easier way of making an impact and sustaining it.

Just to give an example - Apple iPods. It''s an American company with tremendous demand in India. eBay.in has them selling like hotcakes and there are NO Apple Stores in India. iPhones are not sold in India yet every middle class family has one. They pay premiums just to get them. Every time I make a visit to India, my friends ask me to get them iPod, iPhone and it''s major accessories. Even in a down economy people wait in line for the new iPhone, pay premiums and wave it with joy to friends and family, knowing very well that 4 weeks down the road the price is going to be slashed. It defies all logic but falls within emotional criterias.

Instead of iPhone take the example of MontBlanc (Watches, Jewelry, Pens & Accessories). It is a fantastic guaranteed opportunity to feed the brand hungry Indian population! This is also where bureaucracy can help more than hinder the growth. There has to be equal protection for the brand with enforcement of copyright laws and for local craftsmen to produce locally. You don''t have to worry about customs since everything is produced indigenous. Additionally, the Indian partner can use his production line for exporting the brand products to the neighboring countries. It''s an opportunity for the brand to acquire a new market and the local partner to grow and evolve. Have a physical presence with Brand stores in the major cities and move forward with e-commerce website, opening up to the entire population.

Moreover, a lot of people will agree with me when I say Indian customers are not the easiest to deal with no matter what part of the globe. If they know that the item they want to buy is easily available or duplicated from Joe Schmoe down the road, they will beat you down for the price. With the brands it is a prestige to own one, controlled delivery lines, not available down the street, try to duplicate it and you have to deal with copyright infringement. Put all the factors together and you are in a commanding position!!!

GJEPC has done good work to maintain and grow the market keeping the interest of the industry. I was a member till I moved to the USA and enjoyed their yearly parties. I like the fact that they moved the IIJS from Bombay to Goa. It''s a beautiful beach community, more relaxed and less congested environment than Bombay.
 

mac-vision

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Date: 2/20/2009 4:04:40 AM
Author: strmrdr
Interesting article.

As the current international meltdown shows depending on international trade instead of building a home market can be very painful.




Much of the success of the distribution model in the US owes its existence to the Interstate Highway System.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstate_Highway_System

As this map shows from just a few distribution points reachable by train you can reach the entire continental US in a day to a day and a half at low cost.

Form there you can speed up and extend the network using air travel.
Indian manufacturers have always showed a dependency on the international trade, which i absolutely fine as The size they are today is due to international trade. However, they have not focused on the Indian Market, which is a very potential market. One reason why we dont find too many brands in India is because no one has seriously focused on building brands.
The one who has, for e.g. Tanishq (Titan group), Mutlibrands from Gitanjali, are facing challenges but they are not in the bad shape as the other manufacturers. You always have an upper-hand if you dealing directly with the consumers.


In regards to India''s distribution model, it deals similarly as U.S.. The deliveries are done in day or day and a half. However, as Garry and i have mentioned in the article, there are very few companies who provides delivery of valuable goods like Diamonds and jewellery.

60% of the deliveries are done by road and is increasing by 8 to 10%. 85% of Logistics Services are in unorganized sector. Only 12-15 national level players.



Mahek Mehta
 

Garry H (Cut Nut)

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Date: 2/22/2009 6:55:43 PM
Author: raviramani
Hello Garry,

But what do you think about the internal diamond e-tailing and retailing scene inside India for the locals?
India was one of the first countries that joined the E-Comm bandwagon. I remember websites like tsnshop.com, indiaonline.com, indya.com, etc which had a yahoo stores kind of format. The one thing they lacked were proper safety measures for the payment gateways. Needless to say some of them got took over, dropped their online sales dept. or shut down. Payment Gateways have improved over the years, however I don''t know to what extent. It was similar in USA where seveal public companies had a crack at what seemed like money for jam - only to learn that the dynamics of consumer confidence is a huge hurdle.
Of course Pricescope has solved one part of that for companies that are open transperant and ethical. But the margins are low because of the comparison - but the companies that have operated within that space with low cost and superior quality have done rather well.

E-Tailing within the borders will be a tough but profitable venture. Just like every other place on the planet Brand Building & Brand Awareness is the most important aspect along with Consumer Targeting. It will be easier to make early progress in the major cities where majority of the population is educated and savvy. Sustainability and expansion would be much tougher. I think the better way for Indian Diamond Houses moving forward would be to partner with international brands. It was an early concept that was used with the car industry. International brands must partner with Indian conglomerates to build a presence. It''s an easier way of making an impact and sustaining it. I am not sure that there are such brands yet that are prepared to do Web2.0? It is certain now that to win an alection in USA a decent Web2.0 presence is essential. I expect that there will be many brands that try to make that evolution over the next decade as part of the pressure from the GFC - but at least half will fail and there will be many more smaller fragmented new Web2.0 brands to fill their space.

Just to give an example - Apple iPods. It''s an American company with tremendous demand in India. eBay.in has them selling like hotcakes and there are NO Apple Stores in India. iPhones are not sold in India yet every middle class family has one. They pay premiums just to get them. Every time I make a visit to India, my friends ask me to get them iPod, iPhone and it''s major accessories. Even in a down economy people wait in line for the new iPhone, pay premiums and wave it with joy to friends and family, knowing very well that 4 weeks down the road the price is going to be slashed. It defies all logic but falls within emotional criterias. Ravi I am not sure IT products and diamonds fill the same space now - in years to come I sxpect they will.

Instead of iPhone take the example of MontBlanc (Watches, Jewelry, Pens & Accessories). It is a fantastic guaranteed opportunity to feed the brand hungry Indian population! This is also where bureaucracy can help more than hinder the growth. There has to be equal protection for the brand with enforcement of copyright laws and for local craftsmen to produce locally. You don''t have to worry about customs since everything is produced indigenous. Additionally, the Indian partner can use his production line for exporting the brand products to the neighboring countries. It''s an opportunity for the brand to acquire a new market and the local partner to grow and evolve. Have a physical presence with Brand stores in the major cities and move forward with e-commerce website, opening up to the entire population. Ravi I know well the man who cuts and poliches diamonds for that brand, but I doubt they are likely to offer their goods on-line anytime in the next several years.

Moreover, a lot of people will agree with me when I say Indian customers are not the easiest to deal with no matter what part of the globe. If they know that the item they want to buy is easily available or duplicated from Joe Schmoe down the road, they will beat you down for the price. With the brands it is a prestige to own one, controlled delivery lines, not available down the street, try to duplicate it and you have to deal with copyright infringement. Put all the factors together and you are in a commanding position!!! I understand and agree. Diamonds and diamond jewellery are seen as generic goods by most in western countries and inside Asia it is by almost all the population. But what Pricescope has been able to achieve in this respect is 2 fold:
1. let people find the lowest cost vendor and buy a diamond in 30 minutes.
2. find the very very best quality F SI2 eyeclean diamond with fantasic cut quality at 1/2 the price of top branded stores (and get a better diamond).
All that happened via Web2.0 thinking years before W2 became an idea thanks to the PS founder LT
GJEPC has done good work to maintain and grow the market keeping the interest of the industry. I was a member till I moved to the USA and enjoyed their yearly parties. I like the fact that they moved the IIJS from Bombay to Goa. It''s a beautiful beach community, more relaxed and less congested environment than Bombay.
I count Sanjay Kothari and his family among my friends. Indian diamantaires and jewellers are fortunate to have steady and solid people lie Sanjay in control of the GJEPC who can listen well and present good feedback to the govt - eventually the problems that Mahek and I wrote about will be resolved. And the GJEPC (the trade body in India) will continue to smash down those barriers to free trade that caused the depression in the 1930''s.
But right now, in this climate, the safes in Mumbai are chock a block full of diamonds and the owners often feel unsure about selling them on credit to people in foregin countries with the risk of never seeing 10cents in the dollar.

How can we help them sell diamonds inside India - a country with the largest consumption of gold for personbal adornement in the world, and the largest industry for cutting and polishing diamonds, but very little knowledge or trust in the diamond quality and grading system. A fear of getting ripped off.

?????????????
 

mac-vision

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Date: 2/22/2009 6:55:43 PM
Author: raviramani
Hello Garry,


But what do you think about the internal diamond e-tailing and retailing scene inside India for the locals?

India was one of the first countries that joined the E-Comm bandwagon. I remember websites like tsnshop.com, indiaonline.com, indya.com, etc which had a yahoo stores kind of format. The one thing they lacked were proper safety measures for the payment gateways. Needless to say some of them got took over, dropped their online sales dept. or shut down. Payment Gateways have improved over the years, however I don''t know to what extent.

It has improved a lot and online transaction in India is increasing day by day. There are numerous option now provided by the sellers which has increase the confidence of consumers to buy online.PayPal has become very common and A unique gateway has been release which is very commonly used; Cash Cards. You can buy this Cards worth from 1000 to 10,000 (moslty ITZ Cards are bought) from any small outlet just like a prepaid card and you can use it for online transaction. This facility has bring a revloution in online shopping. Its suitable as it has overcome the concern of un-organised market as well. No need to register or provide any detail, JUST SHOP.


E-Tailing within the borders will be a tough but profitable venture. Just like every other place on the planet Brand Building & Brand Awareness is the most important aspect along with Consumer Targeting. It will be easier to make early progress in the major cities where majority of the population is educated and savvy. Sustainability and expansion would be much tougher. I think the better way for Indian Diamond Houses moving forward would be to partner with international brands. It was an early concept that was used with the car industry. International brands must partner with Indian conglomerates to build a presence. It''s an easier way of making an impact and sustaining it.

Can you explain, Why you feel it is going to be Tough? and moreover, why the sustainability and expansion is going to be much tougher? Now the rules are changed. Internation Brands can operate independently in India but I guess international brands would not be comfortable going online still.


Just to give an example - Apple iPods. It''s an American company with tremendous demand in India. eBay.in has them selling like hotcakes and there are NO Apple Stores in India. iPhones are not sold in India yet every middle class family has one. They pay premiums just to get them. Every time I make a visit to India, my friends ask me to get them iPod, iPhone and it''s major accessories. Even in a down economy people wait in line for the new iPhone, pay premiums and wave it with joy to friends and family, knowing very well that 4 weeks down the road the price is going to be slashed. It defies all logic but falls within emotional criterias.


Instead of iPhone take the example of MontBlanc (Watches, Jewelry, Pens & Accessories). It is a fantastic guaranteed opportunity to feed the brand hungry Indian population! This is also where bureaucracy can help more than hinder the growth. There has to be equal protection for the brand with enforcement of copyright laws and for local craftsmen to produce locally. You don''t have to worry about customs since everything is produced indigenous. Additionally, the Indian partner can use his production line for exporting the brand products to the neighboring countries. It''s an opportunity for the brand to acquire a new market and the local partner to grow and evolve. Have a physical presence with Brand stores in the major cities and move forward with e-commerce website, opening up to the entire population.
What you are talking here is getting the production outsourced to India, am i right? This is already practiced by many international jewellery brands whose production houses are in SEEPZ mumbai. They dont want to get into India is because Indian pricing strategy differs a lot from other countries. The other reason was the partnership with Indian company, which is now not required and hence you can expect International brands now entering the Indian market. Cartier already has its showrooms in few major cities.


Moreover, a lot of people will agree with me when I say Indian customers are not the easiest to deal with no matter what part of the globe. If they know that the item they want to buy is easily available or duplicated from Joe Schmoe down the road, they will beat you down for the price. With the brands it is a prestige to own one, controlled delivery lines, not available down the street, try to duplicate it and you have to deal with copyright infringement. Put all the factors together and you are in a commanding position!!!

No matter how much we try, we cant stop duplication. You can get a Mont Blanc pens and accessories for just Rs 1500 with similar finishing in Heera Panna, Mumbai. But the elite class wont be buyin those, brand is very personal and if you want brand you are not goin to buy duplicate. On the other hand, duplication is increasing awareness in brand and you will find a shift in buying the original brands sooner. I think even Companies would strategise accordingly.

GJEPC has done good work to maintain and grow the market keeping the interest of the industry. I was a member till I moved to the USA and enjoyed their yearly parties. I like the fact that they moved the IIJS from Bombay to Goa. It''s a beautiful beach community, more relaxed and less congested environment than Bombay.
Attached is the screen shot of the online payment gateways options offered by the Indian railway booking. I have never this many options anywhere.


Mahek Mehta




Online booking.JPG
 

raviramani

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I have some radical ideas. Too tired to talk about it right now. Mahek those really are toooo many options, not bad at all!!!
 

Garry H (Cut Nut)

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Date: 2/24/2009 9:15:26 PM
Author: raviramani
I have some radical ideas. Too tired to talk about it right now. Mahek those really are toooo many options, not bad at all!!!
Hi Ravi,

Here is a google search on Pricescope that shows hundreds of Indian Expats want to explore buying diamonds with an advantage during family visits back in India.

Personally I suspect they will do better buying here from Pricescope because their is a built in level of protection. Woe-be-tide any vendor associated with Pricescope who does the wrong thing by a consumer (unlike say e-bay shoppers who bring my staff frozen spit that they paid a fair bit for and ask them for help to get their money back).

And also what about all the good folk inside India where young people are starting to seek out diamond rings for engagements etc.
My own secret shopping inside India suggests that very few stores have any level of diamond knowledge.
 

mac-vision

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Date: 2/25/2009 1:07:11 AM
Author: Garry H (Cut Nut)
Date: 2/24/2009 9:15:26 PM

Author: raviramani

I have some radical ideas. Too tired to talk about it right now. Mahek those really are toooo many options, not bad at all!!!
Hi Ravi,


Here is a google search on Pricescope that shows hundreds of Indian Expats want to explore buying diamonds with an advantage during family visits back in India.


Personally I suspect they will do better buying here from Pricescope because their is a built in level of protection. Woe-be-tide any vendor associated with Pricescope who does the wrong thing by a consumer (unlike say e-bay shoppers who bring my staff frozen spit that they paid a fair bit for and ask them for help to get their money back).



And also what about all the good folk inside India where young people are starting to seek out diamond rings for engagements etc.

My own secret shopping inside India suggests that very few stores have any level of diamond knowledge.
You are absolutely right, Garry. They are better off getting it from Pricecsope instead of India.
This is one reason why Indian dont buy it online as they dont receive any trustworthy information from the web which can induce them to buy. They are scared to be ripped off which many must have experience in their purchase from Ebay, India.

I have also come across a bitter experience on Ebay. I bought an Iphone which never got delivered
, Thanks to Paypal atleast i got my money back but still i lost 60$. I was covered till 400 and phone costed 465$
Well that was the past and now from that experience i am very much aware of how should i buy from Ebay.

Unlike Pricescope, one thing is for sure, it is very difficult to catch hold of the seller on ebay.
 

Garry H (Cut Nut)

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I tried to FedEx a ring to somone in India last week. Not a high value.
FedEx say they cant deliver it and they cant get it back from customs to return to us.
So I guess that settles it - there is no easy way for Indian''s to buy from Pricescope vendors.

I have been discussing this with Andrey for some time and we should start a Forum topic for India, and look at opening Pricescope inside India since there are many companies there that list diamonds on RapNet, Polygon and IDEX B2B sites - some in this climate might be interested to sell on-line inside India - some already have strong retail brands and local dealers too.
 

diagem

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Date: 3/3/2009 8:42:32 AM
Author: Garry H (Cut Nut)
I tried to FedEx a ring to somone in India last week. Not a high value.
FedEx say they cant deliver it and they cant get it back from customs to return to us.
So I guess that settles it - there is no easy way for Indian''s to buy from Pricescope vendors.
As far as I know...,you cant use FedEx for international jewelry/gemstone shipping..., because of custom reasons...
 

oldmancoyote

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Date: 3/3/2009 6:12:27 PM
Author: DiaGem

Date: 3/3/2009 8:42:32 AM
Author: Garry H (Cut Nut)
I tried to FedEx a ring to somone in India last week. Not a high value.
FedEx say they cant deliver it and they cant get it back from customs to return to us.
So I guess that settles it - there is no easy way for Indian''s to buy from Pricescope vendors.
As far as I know...,you cant use FedEx for international jewelry/gemstone shipping..., because of custom reasons...
You can. They won''t insure the shipment, and customs clearance can be messy, but they will deliver e.g. US to EU.
 

mac-vision

Rough_Rock
Joined
Jun 10, 2008
Messages
36
I have been discussing this with Andrey for some time and we should start a Forum topic for India, and look at opening Pricescope inside India since there are many companies there that list diamonds on RapNet, Polygon and IDEX B2B sites - some in this climate might be interested to sell on-line inside India - some already have strong retail brands and local dealers too.

Good that you started the Indian forum. Many Indian diamond consumers are seeking for help which they will now be able to find it here.

Moreover, Pricescope India will be a big hit. Idea is becoming a reality.


We have organised a Pricescope INDIA launching presentation on coming tuesday. People are excited to know How can they be benefited through Pricescope.

City: Surat
Date: 17th March 2009
Venue: Hotel Taj Gateway, Imperial hall 2, Surat
Time: 4.00 PM onwards


City: Mumbai
Date: 19th March 2009
Venue: "The Liquid lounge" - Hotel Karma, Nr. Opera House, Mumbai
Time: 11.00 AM to 2.00 PM

Cya there.......
 

mac-vision

Rough_Rock
Joined
Jun 10, 2008
Messages
36
Date: 3/5/2009 7:51:02 PM
Author: oldmancoyote
Date: 3/3/2009 6:12:27 PM

Author: DiaGem


Date: 3/3/2009 8:42:32 AM

Author: Garry H (Cut Nut)

I tried to FedEx a ring to somone in India last week. Not a high value.

FedEx say they cant deliver it and they cant get it back from customs to return to us.

So I guess that settles it - there is no easy way for Indian''s to buy from Pricescope vendors.
As far as I know...,you cant use FedEx for international jewelry/gemstone shipping..., because of custom reasons...
You can. They won''t insure the shipment, and customs clearance can be messy, but they will deliver e.g. US to EU.
But in case of India, It is very messy and many times you are charged as much as the jewellery costs. I am talking specifically for India not others.
 
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