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how do you make crispy crust pizza?

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elrohwen

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FI and I make pizza all the time, but I''ve never been able to get a thin crispy crust. Do you have any tips or tricks that will help?


I''m currently making my own dough. The pizza turns out really good and the crust isn''t soggy, but it''s not crispy either. I do like soft thick crust pizza most of the time, but I wanted to switch it up and make a cripsy pizza for once.


I also use a pizza stone, which seems to have helped a bit since I bought it last year, but still no crispy pizzas.


What else should I be doing? Do you bake the crust first then add the toppings and bake again? Do you just need to make it really really thin?

Also, any tips for using fresh mozzarella? Every time I use it the pizza tends to get soggy, so I go back to the pre-shredded low moisture stuff. Is there something I''m missing in the prep that will make it less watery? Or should I just use it very sparingly?
 

JulieN

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In Italy, they use less cheese than over here, I think. As well, it's totally acceptable to use the commercial mozzarella instead of fresh.

How high does your oven go? You should be baking it at like 500.
 

elrohwen

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Date: 2/15/2009 4:55:11 PM
Author: JulieN
Fresh mozzarella doesn''t really go on pizzas. In Italy, they don''t use fresh mozza on pizza, either. But they also use a lot less cheese.

How high does your oven go? You should be baking it at like 500.
Darn, I was hoping no one would say that. Lol. Oh well. I''ll keep using the low moisture cheese.

Umm, I''m sure it goes up to 500. I think I usually do it at 450 or 475. I''ll crank it up to 500. Thanks!
 

Lorelei

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I think a thinner crust helps with the crispiness...
 

JulieN

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El, I just edited. You can use either, I think...but fresh mozza is not a "must," and if it isn't working for you, just don't use it.

I'm honestly not a fan of mozza anyway, so I don't care if it's fresh or commercial. Now, some creamy gorgonzola...

Do you like the fresh better than pre-shredded?
 

neatfreak

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I disagree Julie, they absolutely use fresh mozz in Italy and it is wonderful (I lived there for a year). The key is to take out some of the moisture first by pressing it a bit between two pieces of cheesecloth. You don''t want to take it right out of the liquid and plop it on. In Italy many times the pizza is a little wetter than we normally eat it here too. Don''t love that aspect of it, but I''ve run into it many times there.

Other things I do for crispy crust:

1. As Julie mentioned use high heat, I usually do 425 which works well.

2. Roll it out super thin.

3. Bake without anything on it for a few minutes then take it out and add the toppings.
 

elrohwen

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Date: 2/15/2009 4:58:52 PM
Author: JulieN
El, I just edited. You can use either, I think...but fresh mozza is not a ''must,'' and if it isn''t working for you, just don''t use it.

I''m honestly not a fan of mozza anyway, so I don''t care if it''s fresh or commercial. Now, some creamy gorgonzola...

Do you like the fresh better than pre-shredded?
I do like the fresh much better and I''ll sit and eat it while I''m putting it on the pizza
That''s why I always try to use it, but since I don''t have much success I just go back to the shredded stuff. If I''m going to use fresh I always mix it with shredded or else the pizza gets really wet.
 

elrohwen

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Date: 2/15/2009 5:03:26 PM
Author: neatfreak
I disagree Julie, they absolutely use fresh mozz in Italy and it is wonderful (I lived there for a year). The key is to take out some of the moisture first by pressing it a bit between two pieces of cheesecloth. You don''t want to take it right out of the liquid and plop it on. In Italy many times the pizza is a little wetter than we normally eat it here too. Don''t love that aspect of it, but I''ve run into it many times there.

Other things I do for crispy crust:

1. As Julie mentioned use high heat, I usually do 425 which works well.

2. Roll it out super thin.

3. Bake without anything on it for a few minutes then take it out and add the toppings.
NF, I was wondering about that! I''ve never tried it that way, but the idea came to me today and I wondered if that''s what I was missing. I''ll try it tonight when we make pizza.
 

neatfreak

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Date: 2/15/2009 5:08:13 PM
Author: elrohwen
Date: 2/15/2009 5:03:26 PM

Author: neatfreak

I disagree Julie, they absolutely use fresh mozz in Italy and it is wonderful (I lived there for a year). The key is to take out some of the moisture first by pressing it a bit between two pieces of cheesecloth. You don''t want to take it right out of the liquid and plop it on. In Italy many times the pizza is a little wetter than we normally eat it here too. Don''t love that aspect of it, but I''ve run into it many times there.


Other things I do for crispy crust:


1. As Julie mentioned use high heat, I usually do 425 which works well.


2. Roll it out super thin.


3. Bake without anything on it for a few minutes then take it out and add the toppings.
NF, I was wondering about that! I''ve never tried it that way, but the idea came to me today and I wondered if that''s what I was missing. I''ll try it tonight when we make pizza.
It works. But make sure you roll it out thin and also try to take a bit of the moisture out of the cheese.

Also another thing is that in America pizzas tend to be over sauced, so make sure you don''t add an insane amount of sauce or else it will make the crust soggy.
 

elrohwen

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Date: 2/15/2009 5:16:40 PM
Author: neatfreak

Date: 2/15/2009 5:08:13 PM
Author: elrohwen

Date: 2/15/2009 5:03:26 PM

Author: neatfreak

I disagree Julie, they absolutely use fresh mozz in Italy and it is wonderful (I lived there for a year). The key is to take out some of the moisture first by pressing it a bit between two pieces of cheesecloth. You don''t want to take it right out of the liquid and plop it on. In Italy many times the pizza is a little wetter than we normally eat it here too. Don''t love that aspect of it, but I''ve run into it many times there.


Other things I do for crispy crust:


1. As Julie mentioned use high heat, I usually do 425 which works well.


2. Roll it out super thin.


3. Bake without anything on it for a few minutes then take it out and add the toppings.
NF, I was wondering about that! I''ve never tried it that way, but the idea came to me today and I wondered if that''s what I was missing. I''ll try it tonight when we make pizza.
It works. But make sure you roll it out thin and also try to take a bit of the moisture out of the cheese.

Also another thing is that in America pizzas tend to be over sauced, so make sure you don''t add an insane amount of sauce or else it will make the crust soggy.
Ok, so speaking of sauce, what do you use? I usually get one of those little cans of sauce and mix it with a can of tomato paste to make it as thick as possible. Then I use just enough to cover the pizza. Is there something else I could use?
 

neatfreak

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Date: 2/15/2009 5:28:32 PM
Author: elrohwen
Date: 2/15/2009 5:16:40 PM

Author: neatfreak


Date: 2/15/2009 5:08:13 PM

Author: elrohwen


Date: 2/15/2009 5:03:26 PM


Author: neatfreak


I disagree Julie, they absolutely use fresh mozz in Italy and it is wonderful (I lived there for a year). The key is to take out some of the moisture first by pressing it a bit between two pieces of cheesecloth. You don''t want to take it right out of the liquid and plop it on. In Italy many times the pizza is a little wetter than we normally eat it here too. Don''t love that aspect of it, but I''ve run into it many times there.



Other things I do for crispy crust:



1. As Julie mentioned use high heat, I usually do 425 which works well.



2. Roll it out super thin.



3. Bake without anything on it for a few minutes then take it out and add the toppings.

NF, I was wondering about that! I''ve never tried it that way, but the idea came to me today and I wondered if that''s what I was missing. I''ll try it tonight when we make pizza.

It works. But make sure you roll it out thin and also try to take a bit of the moisture out of the cheese.


Also another thing is that in America pizzas tend to be over sauced, so make sure you don''t add an insane amount of sauce or else it will make the crust soggy.
Ok, so speaking of sauce, what do you use? I usually get one of those little cans of sauce and mix it with a can of tomato paste to make it as thick as possible. Then I use just enough to cover the pizza. Is there something else I could use?
I have a local Italian deli here that makes a killer sauce so I use that. But before I lived here I actually just used my favorite marinara. I like it better than the "pizza" sauce, but you can use whatever you''d like.
 

Skippy123

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Date: 2/15/2009 4:58:22 PM
Author: Lorelei
I think a thinner crust helps with the crispiness...
Ditto.


I will tell you my recipe real quick. yields 2 pizzas

I use 1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
1 tablespoon yeast
1 tablespoon olive oil


In a bowl about 3/4 cup of water I mix in sugar (or you could use honey) and yeast. I let that froth about 15 mins. Then In another bowl I mix the salt with the flour and make a dent and put the olive oil there and then mix in the yeast (frothy) mixture. I kneed it into a ball, cover it. Let rise (4 hrs) but I am now letting it rise (throw it in the fridge) and then using it the next day, but you can do it the same day.

I roll the dough out super thin (and use a pizza stone). make sure your pizza stone is hot first and I use 450 but 500 is good too. I love to use homemade mozzerala, can be found at whole foods or Trader Joe's, and slice it thinly (tastes like the cheese in Italy). That is how I always get a thin crust. I make pizza 3 or 4 times a month for fun
it is so yummy !

eta: I use a small amount of sauce like you NF and Julie. I also notice if you get the stone hot for about 15 mins before hand I have good luck getting the crust nice and crispy.

Here is a thread of a pizza I made so you can see how I cut up the cheese https://www.pricescope.com/community/threads/what-to-do-with-thanksgiving-day-leftovers-hehe.100979/
 

DiamanteBlu

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Ever since I found out that real pizza Napoletana is certified and that the wood oven temperature is supposed to be at 900 degrees or so, I started preheating the oven with the pizza brick in it to 550 degrees and then cooking the pizza [with the crust rolled thin] for 10-12 ish minutes to come as close as I could to the floor of a proper brick oven.

While trying to find the certification regs I came across this copy of the VPN specs. It looks to have the recipe attached too!

Aside: When I used to make crusty bread, I would cook it with a brick and a pan of water in the oven. I am not sure that would have any relevance to the pizza, though.
 

fisherofmengirly

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I use a pizza stone (preheated for about 20 minutes before hand), then I bake the dough for a few minutes before putting on the ingredients (it helps keep from getting that doughy texture in the center of the pizza).

When I don''t have time or feel like fooling with all that preheating, I use a pizza pan that''s just for pizza and has holes all through it. It''s like magic! Crispy every time! I actually prefer this pan, but my husband thinks the pizza stone makes it more *authentic.*
 

elrohwen

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Date: 2/15/2009 5:45:22 PM
Author: Skippy123

Date: 2/15/2009 4:58:22 PM
Author: Lorelei
I think a thinner crust helps with the crispiness...
Ditto.


I will tell you my recipe real quick. yields 2 pizzas

I use 1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
1 tablespoon yeast
1 tablespoon olive oil


In a bowl about 3/4 cup of water I mix in sugar (or you could use honey) and yeast. I let that froth about 15 mins. Then In another bowl I mix the salt with the flour and make a dent and put the olive oil there and then mix in the yeast (frothy) mixture. I kneed it into a ball, cover it. Let rise (4 hrs) but I am now letting it rise (throw it in the fridge) and then using it the next day, but you can do it the same day.

I roll the dough out super thin (and use a pizza stone). make sure your pizza stone is hot first and I use 450 but 500 is good too. I love to use homemade mozzerala, can be found at whole foods or Trader Joe''s, and slice it thinly (tastes like the cheese in Italy). That is how I always get a thin crust. I make pizza 3 or 4 times a month for fun
it is so yummy !

eta: I use a small amount of sauce like you NF and Julie. I also notice if you get the stone hot for about 15 mins before hand I have good luck getting the crust nice and crispy.

Here is a thread of a pizza I made so you can see how I cut up the cheese https://www.pricescope.com/community/threads/what-to-do-with-thanksgiving-day-leftovers-hehe.100979/
Skippy, thanks for the recipe! My crust recipe is almost exactly the same, but doubled. Maybe it makes bigger pizzas?
 

Skippy123

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Date: 2/15/2009 6:44:16 PM
Author: elrohwen

Skippy, thanks for the recipe! My crust recipe is almost exactly the same, but doubled. Maybe it makes bigger pizzas?
doubled? Do you make 4 pizzas then? If not, then maybe that is why your crusts aren't crispy? My recipe is for 2 pizzas; they are fill a plate in diameter.
 

elrohwen

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Date: 2/15/2009 7:56:49 PM
Author: Skippy123

Date: 2/15/2009 6:44:16 PM
Author: elrohwen

Skippy, thanks for the recipe! My crust recipe is almost exactly the same, but doubled. Maybe it makes bigger pizzas?
doubled? Do you make 4 pizzas then? If not, then maybe that is why your crusts aren''t crispy? My recipe is for 2 pizzas; they are fill a plate in diameter.
They''re probably 13" in diameter. But they could definitely be causing less crispy crusts if I''m using twice as much dough to make as many pizzas as you. I told FI to roll ''em out as thin as he could, so we''ll see if I get crispy this time.
 

Skippy123

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Date: 2/15/2009 8:10:05 PM
Author: elrohwen




Date: 2/15/2009 7:56:49 PM
Author: Skippy123





Date: 2/15/2009 6:44:16 PM
Author: elrohwen

Skippy, thanks for the recipe! My crust recipe is almost exactly the same, but doubled. Maybe it makes bigger pizzas?
doubled? Do you make 4 pizzas then? If not, then maybe that is why your crusts aren't crispy? My recipe is for 2 pizzas; they are fill a plate in diameter.
They're probably 13' in diameter. But they could definitely be causing less crispy crusts if I'm using twice as much dough to make as many pizzas as you. I told FI to roll 'em out as thin as he could, so we'll see if I get crispy this time.
hmmm, well mine come out to about 10' or 11' and make 2, that is probably what is going on. hehe
Keep us posted.
 

elrohwen

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Well, I think my pizza was a little bit crispier last night thanks to all of your suggestions! I was even able to use fresh mozzarella; I put it between paper towels and tried to press out a lot of the moisture, and it didn''t make my pizzas watery at all. I only used 5 big slices on each pizza and then filled in the gaps with shredded mozz.

Both pizzas had carmelized onions, shitake mushrooms, broccolini, and fresh mozzarella. One had chicken sausage with spinach and the other had lamb (I bought these gorgeous lamb steaks, cooked them rare, then sliced and put on the pizza ... I think I ate about half of the pieces before they made it to the pizza
)

Thanks for the tips everyone!
 

cammy85

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You can also spread a little corn meal on the pan before you put your pizza dough on it. That wicks some of the moisture away as it cooks.
 

indypitty

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Skippy,

I made your crust recipe tonight and it was YUMMY!

The only problem I had was tranferring the uncooked pizza from the pizza peel onto the pizza stone, which was already in the oven. Any tips?
 

Skippy123

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Date: 2/16/2009 8:14:14 PM
Author: indypitty
Skippy,

I made your crust recipe tonight and it was YUMMY!

The only problem I had was tranferring the uncooked pizza from the pizza peel onto the pizza stone, which was already in the oven. Any tips?
I put cornmeal and a light dusting of flour on the peel so it slides off. I am so glad to hear!!!




elrohwen, yay to a crispy crust!!! Your pizza sounds yummy!
 

AmberGretchen

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One other tip to try - I lightly brush the crust with olive oil before adding sauce or other toppings, I find this helps a lot with preventing sogginess as well - you don''t need a ton of oil, so it doesn''t really add a huge # of calories, but it helps a lot with the texture.
 

April20

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When I want a thin, crispy crust, I use a pita. I am far too impatient to try and roll crust thin. I am in awe of all of you that have the patience!

For regular crusts, I buy the dough at Trader Joe''s. I keep saying I''m going to make my own, but the $1.19 price tag gets me every time.
 

HappyAnniversary

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Skippy123--Your pizza dough is rising in my fridge as we speak, I''ll make pizza from homemade dough for the first time tomorrow night. The dough was incredibly wet-- I had to add a lot of flour to turn it into a ball. I had more dough on my hands than in a ball at first. Kinda fun.
 

Jas12

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i bake my dough at 525 for about 6-8 min ( thin crust) and bake on a stone. This is the closest i can get to an authentic Napoli style pizza (tomato sauce, a little cheese and fresh basil leaves) --the crust turns out crispy on the edges but tender inside and gets those yummy bubbles on the surface of the dough

Elro--your pizza toppings sound delish (makinge me hungry and it's not even 9 am here!
but that might contribute to the sogginess--the more veg etc. the more moisture that will evaporate
 

elrohwen

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Jas, I agree that more veggies equals more moisture. FI loves toppings and forces me to put a ton on even when I''m trying to make a "less is more" pizza.
Haha
 

Skippy123

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Date: 2/16/2009 9:43:04 PM
Author: HappyAnniversary
Skippy123--Your pizza dough is rising in my fridge as we speak, I''ll make pizza from homemade dough for the first time tomorrow night. The dough was incredibly wet-- I had to add a lot of flour to turn it into a ball. I had more dough on my hands than in a ball at first. Kinda fun.
Oh I am sorry, glad you added more flour; I don''t know why I wrote 3/4 cup, it should be 1/2 cup. I will go fix that.
 

Skippy123

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Date: 2/15/2009 5:45:22 PM
Author: Skippy123


Date: 2/15/2009 4:58:22 PM
Author: Lorelei
I think a thinner crust helps with the crispiness...
Ditto.


I will tell you my recipe real quick. yields 2 pizzas

I use 1 1/2 cups flour
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
1 tablespoon yeast
1 tablespoon olive oil


In a bowl about 1/2 cup of water I mix in sugar (or you could use honey) and yeast. I let that froth about 15 mins. Then In another bowl I mix the salt with the flour and make a dent and put the olive oil there and then mix in the yeast (frothy) mixture. I kneed it into a ball, cover it. Let rise (4 hrs) but I am now letting it rise (throw it in the fridge) and then using it the next day, but you can do it the same day.

I roll the dough out super thin (and use a pizza stone). make sure your pizza stone is hot first and I use 450 but 500 is good too. I love to use homemade mozzerala, can be found at whole foods or Trader Joe's, and slice it thinly (tastes like the cheese in Italy). That is how I always get a thin crust. I make pizza 3 or 4 times a month for fun
it is so yummy !

eta: I use a small amount of sauce like you NF and Julie. I also notice if you get the stone hot for about 15 mins before hand I have good luck getting the crust nice and crispy.

Here is a thread of a pizza I made so you can see how I cut up the cheese https://www.pricescope.com/community/threads/what-to-do-with-thanksgiving-day-leftovers-hehe.100979/
changed from 3/4 to 1/2 cup. 1/2 cup is the correct amount, sorry for the correction. thanks for letting me know Happy Anni.

E- thanks for this thread, it is fun to read about all the people making their homemade pizza.
 
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