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Epidurals, c-sections, and the like.

MonkeyPie

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Sbolte, come join me! :bigsmile:

I find this particular topic fascinating, I guess because my own birth experience was soooo messed up compared to "the norm." I have no idea what it's like to just go into labor and produce a baby at the end, as much as I wish I did. Of course, I doubt I would change a thing about the experience - my end result is pretty freaking adorable - but still.

I haven't done a lot of research on the rates of c-sections, nor do I know if it's common for an epi to be really pushed upon a mother in her worst hour of need. I have to wonder, though, even if they keep asking you if you want one, and you cave, how is that THEIR fault? You obviously felt like you needed it at that moment in time, and I'm sure your body thought, "Omg, THANK YOU." Hindsight is always 20/20, but unless the epi gave complications, is it really that upsetting? Maybe I am just a wuss but that epi (for the brief time it worked for me) was awesome lol.
 

Puppmom

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MP, I only regret my epi because it didn't work! I'm guessing I wouldn't be saying I wish I hadn't had that if it had actually made a dent in the pain. :lol:
 

stephbolt

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I think my concern about medical professionals constantly asking if you want an epidural is that no matter how aware you are of the associated risks, it is going to look like an attractive option when you are in extreme amounts of pain. So I feel like the risks end up being downplayed/ignored in the situation. But obviously you don't need an epidural if you aren't in pain, so it's a tricky situation.

I think the arrangement that several people mentioned in the other thread that they used where they would not be offered an epidural, but knew one was available if they asked, is a good arrangement, possibly in conjunction with the epidural benefits/risks being discussed prior to labor so people can make a more informed decision not burdened by pain.

MP, you had some post-birth complications as a result of your epidural, didn't you? Did you know ahead of time that could have possibly happened, and if not, would it have influenced your decision to get an epidural had you known it ahead of time?
 

MonkeyPie

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puppmom|1313080821|2988606 said:
MP, I only regret my epi because it didn't work! I'm guessing I wouldn't be saying I wish I hadn't had that if it had actually made a dent in the pain. :lol:
Ugh, I hear you.

stephb0lt|1313081622|2988620 said:
I think my concern about medical professionals constantly asking if you want an epidural is that no matter how aware you are of the associated risks, it is going to look like an attractive option when you are in extreme amounts of pain. So I feel like the risks end up being downplayed/ignored in the situation. But obviously you don't need an epidural if you aren't in pain, so it's a tricky situation.

I think the arrangement that several people mentioned in the other thread that they used where they would not be offered an epidural, but knew one was available if they asked, is a good arrangement, possibly in conjunction with the epidural benefits/risks being discussed prior to labor so people can make a more informed decision not burdened by pain.

MP, you had some post-birth complications as a result of your epidural, didn't you? Did you know ahead of time that could have possibly happened, and if not, would it have influenced your decision to get an epidural had you known it ahead of time?
I had the same thing anybody with a needle put directly into their spine (as opposed to the sac, like most epis) would have had. Pressure headaches as my spinal fluid leaked out. By the time they tried this, though, I had been in agonizing pain for several hours and nothing else was working...and then even that failed. The anesthesiologist told me I had enough drugs in me to take out an elephant, but it wasn't working. ETA: Afterward they offered me a blood patch to "fix" it, but by then I did not want them anywhere near my spine. THAT I wish I had taken them up on...I was sick for weeks.

Even had I known of the fluid headaches, I would have done it if it meant I could have dealt with the pain better. It was just unfortunate that it didn't work for me.

I think it's good to let the staff know you don't want anything offered, but something to consider is that unless it's in writing or VERY adamantly expressed, it's part of their job to offer it and let you know when your last chance to get it is.
 

charbie

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MP: I work in a nursing home, and one complaint I get frequently is that patients don't get their pain meds either on time or they don't have them offered. It is a patient right to free from pain, however, "as requested" meds are just that. We aren't allowed to offer meds that are not written as a scheduled order. So technically, since an epi isn't a scheduled drug, but an "as needed" medication, im, curious why they offer it frequently. Just thinking out loud.
 

MonkeyPie

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charbie|1313085045|2988659 said:
MP: I work in a nursing home, and one complaint I get frequently is that patients don't get their pain meds either on time or they don't have them offered. It is a patient right to free from pain, however, "as requested" meds are just that. We aren't allowed to offer meds that are not written as a scheduled order. So technically, since an epi isn't a scheduled drug, but an "as needed" medication, im, curious why they offer it frequently. Just thinking out loud.
I can ask my nurse friend to be certain, but an epi is not pain meds on the same level as say, pain meds for chronic back pain, or migraines, or something similar. With something chronic, waiting an extra hour or two might be beyond miserable, but once you get the meds, it eases. With an epi, you really have a small time frame in which to give/get it, and once that window passes, you're out of luck. I'm simplifying it, of course, but that is the gist.
 

Skippy123

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MonkeyPie|1313088428|2988703 said:
charbie|1313085045|2988659 said:
MP: I work in a nursing home, and one complaint I get frequently is that patients don't get their pain meds either on time or they don't have them offered. It is a patient right to free from pain, however, "as requested" meds are just that. We aren't allowed to offer meds that are not written as a scheduled order. So technically, since an epi isn't a scheduled drug, but an "as needed" medication, im, curious why they offer it frequently. Just thinking out loud.
I can ask my nurse friend to be certain, but an epi is not pain meds on the same level as say, pain meds for chronic back pain, or migraines, or something similar. With something chronic, waiting an extra hour or two might be beyond miserable, but once you get the meds, it eases. With an epi, you really have a small time frame in which to give/get it, and once that window passes, you're out of luck. I'm simplifying it, of course, but that is the gist.
do you know the time frame? I am just curious? I was 90 or 100% Effaced and 80% Dilated when I asked for an EPI. Also, there was a button I could push for more meds, did yours not have a button?? I don't know much about EPI's so now I am curious. I didn't take any other meds I was offered.
 

nfowife

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I had an epidural with my first delivery. Very glad I did as she was posterior and needed the vacuum to help get her out of me, and it was quite a traumatizing experience. Wouldn't have wanted to feel what that was like without some pain relief :) .

With my 2nd I wanted to try to go med-free again. My labor progressed quickly and I was telling DH on the drive to the hospital that I wanted the epi. Said it again when I got to the hospital. Realized as I was pushing 25 minutes after arriving that it wasn't going to happen :rolleyes: . However the recovery was so much easier than my first birth (for a lot of reasons, it was a much more straightforward delivery, faster labor, shorter pushing stage...).

With my 3rd I knew I wanted to go med-free and I knew I could do it so that was already in my head. Got to the hospital and labored there for about 1.5 hours before pushing for a few minutes and she was out. At that point I was already telling myself "10 more minutes and I will ask for the epi" but fortunately things finally got moving.

I think there is a place for epidurals, sure. But I think they are so ingrained in our society's view of childbirth that if you DON'T want one you do have to advocate that for yourself. And it is easier for a nurse if you get one- a happy, calm, quiet patient is easier to deal with than a screaming crazy in-pain one.

Have any of you watched "the business of being born"?
 

janinegirly

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I heard someone say that you will fall in love with your anesthesiologist when he shows up to give you an epi. That's how I felt! I knew I wanted one and once in labor, I honestly could not imagine enduring the next 12 hrs with that kind of intense pain. It worked instantly and I felt nothing but pressure (no pain) for the next 12 hrs, it was amazing. My birth progressed normally, no need for picotin and no issues with the baby being sleepy etc.

I am doing it agagin this time around. Yes the stories of it not working do scare me, I hope that's not too common. I also have heard of it being too late for some moms the 2nd time around since things move pretty fast.
 

Hudson_Hawk

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Skippy123|1313088904|2988709 said:
MonkeyPie|1313088428|2988703 said:
charbie|1313085045|2988659 said:
MP: I work in a nursing home, and one complaint I get frequently is that patients don't get their pain meds either on time or they don't have them offered. It is a patient right to free from pain, however, "as requested" meds are just that. We aren't allowed to offer meds that are not written as a scheduled order. So technically, since an epi isn't a scheduled drug, but an "as needed" medication, im, curious why they offer it frequently. Just thinking out loud.
I can ask my nurse friend to be certain, but an epi is not pain meds on the same level as say, pain meds for chronic back pain, or migraines, or something similar. With something chronic, waiting an extra hour or two might be beyond miserable, but once you get the meds, it eases. With an epi, you really have a small time frame in which to give/get it, and once that window passes, you're out of luck. I'm simplifying it, of course, but that is the gist.
do you know the time frame? I am just curious? I was 90 or 100% Effaced and 80% Dilated when I asked for an EPI. Also, there was a button I could push for more meds, did yours not have a button?? I don't know much about EPI's so now I am curious. I didn't take any other meds I was offered.
I was told the "ideal" time was between 4 and 8 cm dilated. Too soon and you risk stalling your labor and too late and there's no time for the meds to do what they're supposed to do or mess around with things if there's an issue (like having only one side numb). Another thing to consider is not all hospitals offer walking epidurals so in some cases you really are stuck in your bed without many options for moving around/changing positions, etc.
 

Skippy123

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Hudson_Hawk|1313091383|2988735 said:
Skippy123|1313088904|2988709 said:
MonkeyPie|1313088428|2988703 said:
charbie|1313085045|2988659 said:
MP: I work in a nursing home, and one complaint I get frequently is that patients don't get their pain meds either on time or they don't have them offered. It is a patient right to free from pain, however, "as requested" meds are just that. We aren't allowed to offer meds that are not written as a scheduled order. So technically, since an epi isn't a scheduled drug, but an "as needed" medication, im, curious why they offer it frequently. Just thinking out loud.
I can ask my nurse friend to be certain, but an epi is not pain meds on the same level as say, pain meds for chronic back pain, or migraines, or something similar. With something chronic, waiting an extra hour or two might be beyond miserable, but once you get the meds, it eases. With an epi, you really have a small time frame in which to give/get it, and once that window passes, you're out of luck. I'm simplifying it, of course, but that is the gist.
do you know the time frame? I am just curious? I was 90 or 100% Effaced and 80% Dilated when I asked for an EPI. Also, there was a button I could push for more meds, did yours not have a button?? I don't know much about EPI's so now I am curious. I didn't take any other meds I was offered.
I was told the "ideal" time was between 4 and 8 cm dilated. Too soon and you risk stalling your labor and too late and there's no time for the meds to do what they're supposed to do or mess around with things if there's an issue (like having only one side numb). Another thing to consider is not all hospitals offer walking epidurals so in some cases you really are stuck in your bed without many options for moving around/changing positions, etc.
HH, thanks for letting me know! I was just curious since I never gave it some thought until reading this just now. I am now curious what type of epidural I had. I know I could not walk around. I already had an IV going as they tried to stop my labor and told me I couldn't walk around.
 

Skippy123

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MP, my mom had similar issues w/her epidural. I am sorry that happened; that sucks ;(

ETA: the doctor did push for a C section. With twins there is a 50/50 chance that the second baby will flip after the 1st comes out so I would need a c section anyway. I told them I would take my chances. I ended up delivering both vaginally. I do have a friend who had one vag and one c section. I am glad I took my chances though in the end.
 

icekid

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stephb0lt|1313081622|2988620 said:
I think my concern about medical professionals constantly asking if you want an epidural is that no matter how aware you are of the associated risks, it is going to look like an attractive option when you are in extreme amounts of pain.
I am curious about what exactly you believe are the associated risks of an epidural? The risks truly are quite minimal. A headache, like MP had, can happen but is usually not as prolonged.

I am an anesthesiologist and place epidurals for a living (and had an excellent one during my labor!) There is a lot of misinformation here. While certainly most women do not NEED an epidural for childbirth and going without is an absolutely valid choice, I do not want women to be scared away from it either due to misconceptions.

There really is no "too late" for an epidural. I've had patients completely dilated and effaced hold that baby in until we could place their epidural. Some places will not place it too late in labor just due to time constraints, though.

A "walking epidural" basically means that you are getting a lower concentration of local anesthetic medicine. Therefore you do not generally get as profound leg weakness and can still be mobile. Yes, I am sure there is a medico-legal issue regarding laboring patients with epidurals walking.

MP- I wish you had gone for the blood patch too. They generally make a great difference for these kind of headaches.

Let me know if there are other questions. Epidurals are great if you want one. And if you don't want one, that is great too.
 

Puppmom

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Icekid, what are the reasons that an epidural wouldn't work? Mine didn't do anything which ended up being ok since I delivered DS 20 minutes after insertion. Maybe that's the problem? It takes time? I swear they told me the relief would be instant.
 

stephbolt

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icekid|1313092913|2988755 said:
stephb0lt|1313081622|2988620 said:
I think my concern about medical professionals constantly asking if you want an epidural is that no matter how aware you are of the associated risks, it is going to look like an attractive option when you are in extreme amounts of pain.
I am curious about what exactly you believe are the associated risks of an epidural? The risks truly are quite minimal. A headache, like MP had, can happen but is usually not as prolonged.

I am an anesthesiologist and place epidurals for a living (and had an excellent one during my labor!) There is a lot of misinformation here. While certainly most women do not NEED an epidural for childbirth and going without is an absolutely valid choice, I do not want women to be scared away from it either due to misconceptions.

There really is no "too late" for an epidural. I've had patients completely dilated and effaced hold that baby in until we could place their epidural. Some places will not place it too late in labor just due to time constraints, though.

A "walking epidural" basically means that you are getting a lower concentration of local anesthetic medicine. Therefore you do not generally get as profound leg weakness and can still be mobile. Yes, I am sure there is a medico-legal issue regarding laboring patients with epidurals walking.

MP- I wish you had gone for the blood patch too. They generally make a great difference for these kind of headaches.

Let me know if there are other questions. Epidurals are great if you want one. And if you don't want one, that is great too.
I am glad to have you weigh in here, icekid, it's great to have an expert on the topic of epidurals. I think I used the word "risks" a little too casually, because the things I am thinking about are not necessarily risks, but more other potential interventions/issues I would prefer to avoid, such as a longer labor, and higher incidence of instrument assisted deliveries or c-section. I would also like to avoid being confined to a bed during labor, so unless a walking epi was available to me, that would be another con for me. I am glad that overall the true medical risks of this procedure are so low that those women who choose to recieve an epi can do so without concern.
 

Kunzite

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ice - I'm also curious why epidurals fail. Mine was placed twice and didn't work either time. A lot of people mention the trauma of not getting the natural birth they wanted, but I'm slightly traumatized by not getting the medicated birth I wanted, lol!! I was in no way prepared to deal with that sort of pain. I'm also curious about caths. In Charbie's thread she mentioned not getting one as part of an unmedicated birth, but I certainly had one (ooooooouch!) :-o
 

MonkeyPie

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I like that you can reply to our questions, icekid. I'm sure many will benefit from your knowledge!

My anesthesiologists were all ok...though I much preferred the last one I had, that deliberately put it into my spine. One poke and she had it in. But the other two? Grinding against bone, fishing around to find the right spot, making me throw up the pain was so agonizing. The last one, a woman, told my husband while she tried to find a cocktail that would help with my pain that she wished so badly that she could do an xray of my spine and see what was blocking the pain meds. It wasn't really blocked...the first one, after making me scream and cry, worked, kind of. It made me kick involuntarily, my entire left side from shoulder to foot was completely dead (no feeling at all) and my right sort only kind of went numb, I still felt pressure. It also made my heart rate plummet. So I didn't have a block, really, it was just that my body stopped reacting to it after a couple hours.
 

Loves Vintage

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Puppmom and Kunzite - Is it possible that your epis "worked," but the dosage was perhaps not strong enough? Did you speak with your anesthesiologists about it at the time? Puppmom, sounds like you were running out of time, but, Kunzite, I don't recall if you had time to have that sort of conversation.

I've heard people say that they still feel pressure. I felt PAIN by the time I was pushing (almost 3 hrs) and wonder whether the epi had mostly worn off by the time she was born. The epi was "topped off" (is that the appropriate term?) before I started pushing, and I did not have a "button" to push to increase the medication. Not sure what dictates whether such a button is offered or not?

In any event, re: the concen re: an epi leading to more interventions, the more I think about it, the more I am convinced I may well have wound up with a c-section had I not had the epi. The epi allowed me some much needed rest. I am not sure if I could have pushed for 3 hours if I hadn't slept for a few hours. I was spent. Emotionally and physically. I was grateful for that epi, and yes, I did adore the anesthesiologists and told them so, repeatedly. Haha.
 

MustangGal

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My plan was to deliver medication free, but the epi was pretty nice when they talked me in to it. I think what lead me down that path was the induction. I knew when I agreed to it that there was a much higher change I wouldn't be able to handle the pain of a pitocin labor. I was actually getting through it, but at 8cm DS was turned and the doc thought the epi would help me relax and the baby turn. They never asked me about getting one before that (that I remember), and it didn't seem forced on me. I couldn't move anyway, since they had me laying a certain way to get him turned, but it didn't feel too strong, I could feel pressure and move my legs some. In the end, after 2 hours of puching, the stinker wouldn't budge so we had to do a c-section. Having the epi in place made that much easier, they just cranked it up and rolled me in to the operating room. I remember shaking a bunch and clenching my teeth the whole time, but that wore off once they were done.

I don't blame the epi or even the pitocin for the whole ordeal ending in a c-section. I blame it on my almost 9 pound baby facing the wrong way. He's just as stubborn on the outside...

The hospital I delivered at was in the ritzier side of town (Scottsdale for those that know AZ), and during birthing classes the nurse mentioned that the epi rate was 90-95%. That seemed really high to me!
 

Pandora II

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In the UK the epidural rate is less than half that of the USA. I'm certain that this is because we use Entonox which gives the mother a) effective pain relief, b) it's calming and c) something to concentrate on. I would have called for the epidural far earlier than I did without it.

I did have an epidural - mainly because after 42 hours of labour I was both exhausted and not even fingertip dilated. The hospital said that they needed to start pitocin because my water's had broken before labour started and they'd prefer not to do a c-section. My contractions were already ridiculous - up to 5 minutes long with only a minute between them - so they warned me that it would ramp up once the pitocin started. I asked for an epidural before they started and they said that they considered it a good idea.

I still had to wait nearly 2 hours as the obstetric anaesthetists were all in theatre and the wussy ones in the rest of the hospital were all scared because I'd had major spinal surgery. The girl who did mine actually said it was one of the easiest she'd ever placed as I knew how to sit and I wasn't scared of it - I'd had 5 already in an attempt to do something for my chronic pain and knew that they are pretty painless, far less bad than having the IV put in my arm. It was WONDERFUL once it got going - ie 20 seconds later!

I had a mobile epi and it was also a PCA so I was totally in control. Sadly because of the pitocin and the crazy contractions I was stuck in bed which may not have helped with Daisy's malposition.

I ended up in deep transverse arrest - her head was sideways on and jammed solid in my pelvis which meant that even when I got to 10cm it didn't matter how much I pushed she wasn't moving even a millimetre. It was probably the reason that I didn't dilate - no downwards pressure on the cervix and despite turning the epi off over 2 hours before the pushing part I had zero urge to push.

When the 3 OBs walked in and each had a go at manually turning her I can tell you I hit that PCA button pretty darn fast. Since I was then rushed to the operating theatre having the epidural in place made life much easier for them as no-one had to get a line in or anything.

I ended up with ventouse (failed after 3 attempts) and finally Keilland's forceps - they actually turned her rather than just lifting her out. Then a massive haemorrhage (over 5 pints), a couple of hours unconcious with DH convinced I was dying (I got lucky) and 2 days in ICU plus 5 blood transfusions. I was very lucky the forceps worked as they told me I probably wouldn't have survived a subsequent caesarian.

My uncle who is a consultant OB/Gynae in the UK and my father who has a lot of experience in obstetrics (he was a doctor in a developing country and did a lot of deliveries there in pretty basic conditions - he even delivered my brother) had teased me for years and years that my hips and pelvis were not exactly 'child-bearing' so I do wonder if they were actually right and things went awry for that reason.

At any rate I certainly don't blame the epi as she was stuck before I even got that.
 

choro72

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I want to join! At least I'll be following this thread :)
Epi is far less common in Japan. When my mom had me, she had to go through 30+ hours of labor, and they had to suck me out with a plunger. She had 28 stitches, and pretty much passed out after she had me from loss of blood.
My cousin gave birth a year ago. She had an almost 30 hours of labor after her water broke, hastened with pitocin.
My friend gave birth 6 months ago, another long labor, finally had a balloon pumped in her vagina to widen her canal.

All of these above ended naturally, and I shudder to think what I will have to go through with a 4-7 frame! All my friends in the US gave birth with epi. Perhaps it's "easier" in Japan considering that an 8lbs baby is HUGE?
I would like to go natural unless something drastic happens, but you can never plan for these things. Anyhow, thanks for the topic MP!
 

Kunzite

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Loves Vintage|1313097174|2988812 said:
Puppmom and Kunzite - Is it possible that your epis "worked," but the dosage was perhaps not strong enough? Did you speak with your anesthesiologists about it at the time? Puppmom, sounds like you were running out of time, but, Kunzite, I don't recall if you had time to have that sort of conversation.
It worked depending on what you mean by worked. I had the line and the medicine was in my body but since it didn't do what it was intended to do I consider that failing. I spoke to him through moans and grunts ( ;)) ) but my DH and L&D nurse both spoke to him extensively. The second time he tried he "put in the kitchen sink" and I know he wasn't exaggerating about that because it all went to my right leg. I couldn't move my leg for nearly the entire day after delivery which my PP nurse said she'd never seen before. So lack of medicine wasn't the problem and neither was time. I'd have to look back in O's journal to be sure but I think we tried the first epidural about 6 hours before he was born. This guy had the best bedside manner, let me tell you. He just kept telling me that it probably didn't work because my body wasn't ready for labor. Thanks dude, blame the lady that's in pain! I'll also add that both times getting the epidural was extremely painful, like a knife running down my back. I'm convinced the guy wasn't a real doctor :sick:
 

fieryred33143

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My issue with the epi was a) that I think I could have gone without it had the hospital allowed me to move and b) the feeling afterwards. Keep in mind that I am someone who has never, ever been drunk. That dazed, confused, not in control feeling was completely foreign to me and I hated every second of that. It definitely wasn't my nurse's fault that I "caved" but she could have just said "hey when you want the epi let me know" and left it at that. If I hadnt know better I would have thought she would get a commission because man did she push that thing and she sure made it sound amazing.

As for the movement, when I had to sit up to get the epi I felt so much better. I went through a few contractions (pitocin made them back to back) before they were able to insert the needle and it felt amazing to sit up. What a difference. I was able to breathe through it. But they just wouldn't let me move. (Plus the guy messed up the first time so half f my body was numb and I was still feeling everything for another hour or so).
 

Loves Vintage

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Kunzite|1313105762|2988906 said:
Loves Vintage|1313097174|2988812 said:
Puppmom and Kunzite - Is it possible that your epis "worked," but the dosage was perhaps not strong enough? Did you speak with your anesthesiologists about it at the time? Puppmom, sounds like you were running out of time, but, Kunzite, I don't recall if you had time to have that sort of conversation.
It worked depending on what you mean by worked. I had the line and the medicine was in my body but since it didn't do what it was intended to do I consider that failing. I spoke to him through moans and grunts ( ;)) ) but my DH and L&D nurse both spoke to him extensively. The second time he tried he "put in the kitchen sink" and I know he wasn't exaggerating about that because it all went to my right leg. I couldn't move my leg for nearly the entire day after delivery which my PP nurse said she'd never seen before. So lack of medicine wasn't the problem and neither was time. I'd have to look back in O's journal to be sure but I think we tried the first epidural about 6 hours before he was born. This guy had the best bedside manner, let me tell you. He just kept telling me that it probably didn't work because my body wasn't ready for labor. Thanks dude, blame the lady that's in pain! I'll also add that both times getting the epidural was extremely painful, like a knife running down my back. I'm convinced the guy wasn't a real doctor :sick:
Yikes, Kunzite! Yeah, I'd say it didn't work then! I thought maybe you didn't have time to get it corrected. And, what a strange explanation he offered!! It would seem there would be a lot more women (including me!) whose epi's wouldn't work if readiness for labor were the test. :nono:
 

MonkeyPie

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fiery|1313108639|2988943 said:
My issue with the epi was a) that I think I could have gone without it had the hospital allowed me to move and b) the feeling afterwards. Keep in mind that I am someone who has never, ever been drunk. That dazed, confused, not in control feeling was completely foreign to me and I hated every second of that. It definitely wasn't my nurse's fault that I "caved" but she could have just said "hey when you want the epi let me know" and left it at that. If I hadnt know better I would have thought she would get a commission because man did she push that thing and she sure made it sound amazing.

As for the movement, when I had to sit up to get the epi I felt so much better. I went through a few contractions (pitocin made them back to back) before they were able to insert the needle and it felt amazing to sit up. What a difference. I was able to breathe through it. But they just wouldn't let me move. (Plus the guy messed up the first time so half f my body was numb and I was still feeling everything for another hour or so).
I don't get the not moving thing! It's common knowledge that for most women walking hurries labor along, gravity and all. So I don't get why they try to keep so many of us in bed, prone and feeling worse than we otherwise would. This didn't apply to me since every time I'd walk, my contractions would all but stop, so laying/sitting worked better for me. But then everything about my experience was backward!

fiery, do you think that next time you will be more demanding and vocal about what you want and need? I think for a lot of us, the first time is such a learning experience that we don't realize how differently it would have gone had we just spoken up.
 

MonkeyPie

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choro72|1313105013|2988893 said:
Perhaps it's "easier" in Japan considering that an 8lbs baby is HUGE?
Maybe, but generally (and of course, there are exceptions), your body won't really make a baby that is too big to deliver, unless you have GD or something else influencing it. (Or a DH that is like a foot taller than you, lol.) In Japan the bone structure of the masses is narrower though...so maybe you're right! I would have loved to have had a 6 pound, tiny baby lol.
 

stephbolt

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Messages
1,072
MonkeyPie|1313113034|2988989 said:
I don't get the not moving thing! It's common knowledge that for most women walking hurries labor along, gravity and all. So I don't get why they try to keep so many of us in bed, prone and feeling worse than we otherwise would. This didn't apply to me since every time I'd walk, my contractions would all but stop, so laying/sitting worked better for me. But then everything about my experience was backward!.
I wonder how much of it is tied to CYA policies again - I'm curious for the women that have been there how much fetal monitoring they were required to have, and how that impacted their ability to move around if they so desired.
 

MonkeyPie

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stephb0lt|1313113229|2988991 said:
MonkeyPie|1313113034|2988989 said:
I don't get the not moving thing! It's common knowledge that for most women walking hurries labor along, gravity and all. So I don't get why they try to keep so many of us in bed, prone and feeling worse than we otherwise would. This didn't apply to me since every time I'd walk, my contractions would all but stop, so laying/sitting worked better for me. But then everything about my experience was backward!.
I wonder how much of it is tied to CYA policies again - I'm curious for the women that have been there how much fetal monitoring they were required to have, and how that impacted their ability to move around if they so desired.
That's a thought. They are totally ok with you walking around the hospital in full labor, as long as you aren't admitted yet. Once they admitted me, I got an IV right away (but they knew my blood sugar and stuff was low since I had already passed out in the shower, so mine may not count) and I got the band around my belly to monitor contractions and Micah's heart rate. I could have gotten up and walked with them, though, because I could have pulled the little stand around with me since it was small. I just didn't want to!
 

Loves Vintage

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4,563
stephb0lt|1313113229|2988991 said:
MonkeyPie|1313113034|2988989 said:
I don't get the not moving thing! It's common knowledge that for most women walking hurries labor along, gravity and all. So I don't get why they try to keep so many of us in bed, prone and feeling worse than we otherwise would. This didn't apply to me since every time I'd walk, my contractions would all but stop, so laying/sitting worked better for me. But then everything about my experience was backward!.
I wonder how much of it is tied to CYA policies again - I'm curious for the women that have been there how much fetal monitoring they were required to have, and how that impacted their ability to move around if they so desired.
I had the same fetal monitor belt that MP mentioned. I think this will vary by hospital, but the monitors at my hospital had battery packs, so you were free to move about the L&D floor. My doctors encouraged me to walk to get things moving. When you get back to the room, they just plug you back in to the wall outlet.

I know you can ask to have intermittent monitoring. This was encouraged in my hypno-birthing class, which I questioned at the time. If something is going on with my baby, then I would want to know that IMMEDIATELY, not when they happen to put the monitor on me again. Of course, I understand the desire to be able to walk, use the birthing ball, have freedom of movement, etc., but I do think the battery monitor provides an ideal solution. Everyone is different though. Some people will decline on the basis that they think more monitoring will lead to more intervention. I did not have that concern from the outset because I trusted my doctors. You have a LOT of prenatal visits. I talked to my doctors a LOT about my concerns and expectations. If I'd had any real worries about my doctors, I would have switched practices long before birthing.
 

megumic

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Messages
1,647
MonkeyPie|1313113878|2989003 said:
stephb0lt|1313113229|2988991 said:
MonkeyPie|1313113034|2988989 said:
I don't get the not moving thing! It's common knowledge that for most women walking hurries labor along, gravity and all. So I don't get why they try to keep so many of us in bed, prone and feeling worse than we otherwise would. This didn't apply to me since every time I'd walk, my contractions would all but stop, so laying/sitting worked better for me. But then everything about my experience was backward!.
I wonder how much of it is tied to CYA policies again - I'm curious for the women that have been there how much fetal monitoring they were required to have, and how that impacted their ability to move around if they so desired.
That's a thought. They are totally ok with you walking around the hospital in full labor, as long as you aren't admitted yet. Once they admitted me, I got an IV right away (but they knew my blood sugar and stuff was low since I had already passed out in the shower, so mine may not count) and I got the band around my belly to monitor contractions and Micah's heart rate. I could have gotten up and walked with them, though, because I could have pulled the little stand around with me since it was small. I just didn't want to!
From my research it's the IV and the fetal heart rate monitor keeping you tied to a bed. Perhaps just hospital policy as well. Plus the nurses want you to stay put where they can control everything. I've heard that there are new wireless fetal heart rate monitors that will permit more movement, but not sure how widely they are used. Plus, some monitors are small needles inserted through the vagina into baby's skull which would certainly prevent movement. It's my understanding that most US hospitals require constant fetal monitoring, despite the research that it does not improve outcomes.

Promise to post research links tomorrow...too tired. However, Pushed by Jennifer Block is a great read. Certainly a skewed view, but relies on solid research and very informative even for skeptics.
 
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