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Do you use "bad language" in front of children?

jewelerman

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Sep 30, 2007
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i guess im in the minority here because few of my friends or family use "bad language"in any conversation period,let alone with children around.I was raised that using foul language is rude and disrespectful.i have no problem asking people to watch their language in public places like restaurants and theaters.It surprises me that people in stores will talk on their cell phone and drop the F bomb not caring who is within ear shot.I recently quite a job because of a very hostile work environment. The manager continually called us F****** on a daily basis.When we told him to stop, he refused.Even after sensitivity and sexual harassment re-training by the district manager he still continues and the company refuses to fire him because we were one of the top selling stores in the chain.All but one of the staff members have quite due to his language and sexually degrading comments to both women and men.
 

charbie

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I find myself sometimes struggling to remain PC in front of my friends kids...even mild "curse" words! I don't plan to make swearing a habit around my kids, though I know it will happen. I always could tell when my mom or dad was really mad if a swear word popped put.

My aunt always tells the story of her daughter as a very young child uttering, "Damnit Donna!" after my aunt did something. They were in public but it was apparent my cousin had no idea what she was saying and how it was said perfectly in context. My aunt was mortified and decided to curb both hers and my uncles language at that point.
 

jewelerman

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swingirl, i agree with you that kids learn by example and there are better ways of expressing yourself then with the use of vulgarity.
 

Pandora II

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I don't swear that much unless I'm super-frustrated or drop something etc. My swear words of choice are not great ones though. I used to live in Italy and found saying most English swear-words weren't understood there so maybe I should switch to Italian ones in front of my daughter.

Unfortunately she over heard me saying for 'F**k's Sake' and has been saying 'Buck Sake' to see what reaction she gets. I've been working on turning it into 'Big Snakes' - I keep pythons so not totally crazy - which seems to be working.

On the whole swearing doesn't bother me as long as it's not every other word. I used to work in the House of Lords and the language in there was often far from lordly!
 

mrs jam

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I am the queen of "Cheese and rice; got dandruff! Some of it itches!!" Whenever I'm feeling cranky or frustrated, saying my "faux" swear phrases out loud usually makes me laugh, and I can usually kick my bad mood or thoughts to the curb. For me, I find that using the real potty words just exacerbates a bad mood rather than relieves it.

So no, I don't usually swear in front of kids because I don't do a lot of swearing, in general.
 

swingirl

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UnluckyTwin|1307313298|2938566 said:
swingirl|1307312458|2938563 said:
I rarely swear. My husband and I made a conscious effort not to use foul language or name calling around our children. We told them that people who swear don't have a good enough vocabulary to express themselves. Everyone, of course, learns the words and goes through a stage of using them for emphasis but I wanted our kids to know it's not an acceptable way to communicate. I am happy to report that although our kids, who are now young adults, certainly say a few choice words to their friends, they respect their parents and family enough that there's is no potty mouth around us.

Kids learn by example.

I understand that everyone has the right to use the language they deem appropriate in their own homes, and every parent has the right to teach their children what to say or not say. But I find this kind of reasoning offensive, because it's simply untrue of those of us who are plenty articulate and use swear words to express exactly the kinds of things that can't be expressed with other words. Children can be taught their parents' ideas, but they don't need to be taught in such a way that puts down others who have different ideas, or in a way that contradicts empirical evidence. Just my $0.02.
There is no reason for you to be offended. The psychology used to raise my kids wasn't meant to be politically correct so that no outsider gets offended. Certainly, my adult children know there are a great many brilliant well-spoken people who still need to express their anger using the f word. But they were brought up to consider foul language rude and often sexist, since quite a few swear words have to do with anatomy and gender.
 

nkarma

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Not intentionally....I do not have kids and like Freke joke that my kids' first words will be curse words. Curse words are the few words I don't have a filter on and even feel great at work when someone lets one out in case I do one day too. My use of bad words has been lessening over the years, but I seem to spew them more when there are small kids around. Then I say something sh*t I didn't mean to say that...eh whatever.
 

lbbaber

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swingirl|1307317880|2938600 said:
UnluckyTwin|1307313298|2938566 said:
swingirl|1307312458|2938563 said:
I rarely swear. My husband and I made a conscious effort not to use foul language or name calling around our children. We told them that people who swear don't have a good enough vocabulary to express themselves. Everyone, of course, learns the words and goes through a stage of using them for emphasis but I wanted our kids to know it's not an acceptable way to communicate. I am happy to report that although our kids, who are now young adults, certainly say a few choice words to their friends, they respect their parents and family enough that there's is no potty mouth around us.

Kids learn by example.

I understand that everyone has the right to use the language they deem appropriate in their own homes, and every parent has the right to teach their children what to say or not say. But I find this kind of reasoning offensive, because it's simply untrue of those of us who are plenty articulate and use swear words to express exactly the kinds of things that can't be expressed with other words. Children can be taught their parents' ideas, but they don't need to be taught in such a way that puts down others who have different ideas, or in a way that contradicts empirical evidence. Just my $0.02.
There is no reason for you to be offended. The psychology used to raise my kids wasn't meant to be politically correct so that no outsider gets offended. Certainly, my adult children know there are a great many brilliant well-spoken people who still need to express their anger using the f word. But they were brought up to consider foul language rude and often sexist, since quite a few swear words have to do with anatomy and gender.

Swingirl, I worked in a children and adolescent's psych. hospital for 7 year before I recently quit to become a SAHM...that explanation IS EXACTLY what we taught our patients on the unit. They wanted to know "why" swearing was not allowed and we were instructed to tell them 1. It's not polight/inappropriate and 2. there are better ways to express one's anger /frustration. ...."use your words". The teens would try to throw out arguments as to why it should be allowed but bottom line, if they go into a job or college interview cursing like a truck driver they will not make a good impression.

I do not curse in front of my children although I have slipped a few times. I do believe that kids learn from example so I try my best to model good behavior. Swearing, IMO, is inappropriate. Words are a powerful tool. I would like to think that am teaching them to choose them wisely.
 

chemgirl

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I try not to swear in front of kids. I don't know what I'll do when I have my own, but I try not to swear in front of other people's kids because I wouldn't want to be the person to teach somebody else's kid a bad word! I have been known to yell fffff-udge in front of my super conservative little cousins, but that's about it. I have some very conservative family members so I try to edit myself when I'm around them. One cousin was accepted to my old University and her dad called me to ask if people curse at school. I said yes, so she's now at a local college so her parents can keep on eye on her. I'm glad I lied when he asked me if people swore at my old highschool! I think he really takes it too far. They're just words.
 

jaysonsmom

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I one of the "prissys" I guess. I never had to hold back on swearing in front of the kids because that was never part of my vocabulary growing up. Dh on the other hand, is always having to check himself, or rather, I have to "the stink eye" to check him. Like Mrs. Jam, he's also started using some faux swearing....like the most recent: "Shut the front door!"

I don't like bad language in general, and I've wanted to speak up to my boss several times..she is a woman, and only a year older than me, but we could not be more different because ever other word out of her mouth makes me flinch, especially the her favorite G-d D it! Which is not only offending me but also my faith, and I'm about to quit over this!
 

Kaleigh

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We had the best intentions , so tried to keep it to a slip now and then... We did a great job... It was My In Laws that introduced them to bad language... My son was just with his cousin, and was appalled at his Aunt who was cussing up a storm in front of my Nephew.. He's 6!!! I am going to put her straight this summer... :praise:
 

Dreamer_D

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I don't like to swear in front of my kid. We are real potty mouths so it is hard, but we make a good effort. I would rather he learned other ways to communicate, ya know?

ETA: I got much better at not swearing when I started teaching and in lecture, though sometimes the university kids do enjoy a choice foul word as a joke, I think they are uncomfortbale with too much swearing. So I self-edit there and it carried over pretty well into our house.
 

Trekkie

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Ever seen an episode of Dexter? Think of Debra Morgan on a bad day. Holy sh*t f*ck on a stick of c*ck, g*dd*mmit.

Yup, that's me. If someone tried to turn my life into a reality show they wouldn't get very far. Too many beeps to actually figure out what the h*ll I'm saying.

I do try not do it in front of children but it's very difficult. I find myself starting to say, "oh for f*ck's sake" and then change it to "oh for g*d's sake" or "for chr*ssakes" which really annoys the nuns I work with. I think they're getting used to me now.

lbbaber said:
swingirl|1307317880|2938600 said:
UnluckyTwin|1307313298|2938566 said:
swingirl|1307312458|2938563 said:
I rarely swear. My husband and I made a conscious effort not to use foul language or name calling around our children. We told them that people who swear don't have a good enough vocabulary to express themselves. Everyone, of course, learns the words and goes through a stage of using them for emphasis but I wanted our kids to know it's not an acceptable way to communicate. I am happy to report that although our kids, who are now young adults, certainly say a few choice words to their friends, they respect their parents and family enough that there's is no potty mouth around us.

Kids learn by example.

I understand that everyone has the right to use the language they deem appropriate in their own homes, and every parent has the right to teach their children what to say or not say. But I find this kind of reasoning offensive, because it's simply untrue of those of us who are plenty articulate and use swear words to express exactly the kinds of things that can't be expressed with other words. Children can be taught their parents' ideas, but they don't need to be taught in such a way that puts down others who have different ideas, or in a way that contradicts empirical evidence. Just my $0.02.
There is no reason for you to be offended. The psychology used to raise my kids wasn't meant to be politically correct so that no outsider gets offended. Certainly, my adult children know there are a great many brilliant well-spoken people who still need to express their anger using the f word. But they were brought up to consider foul language rude and often sexist, since quite a few swear words have to do with anatomy and gender.

Swingirl, I worked in a children and adolescent's psych. hospital for 7 year before I recently quit to become a SAHM...that explanation IS EXACTLY what we taught our patients on the unit. They wanted to know "why" swearing was not allowed and we were instructed to tell them 1. It's not polight/inappropriate and 2. there are better ways to express one's anger /frustration. ...."use your words". The teens would try to throw out arguments as to why it should be allowed but bottom line, if they go into a job or college interview cursing like a truck driver they will not make a good impression.

I do not curse in front of my children although I have slipped a few times. I do believe that kids learn from example so I try my best to model good behavior. Swearing, IMO, is inappropriate. Words are a powerful tool. I would like to think that am teaching them to choose them wisely.

This is why I have made a concerted effort to teach my brother not to swear. He is 17 and I can count on one hand the number of times I have said an off-colour word around him... And whenever I do, he is quick to tell me, "You have a vocabulary. Use it!"

It sucks when they turn around and use your own words against you. :( I guess I should be glad these are the only words in his arsenal!
 

Jennifer W

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This thread just reminded me of my friend's son. When he was about 9 or 10, he came running into the house one day and shouted out, all in one breath "mummy, mummy, daddy said f*ck! Is f*ck a bad word? Because daddy said f*ck. I heard him say it, he said f*ck. If f*ck is really a bad word, why did daddy say f*ck? He shouldn't have said f*ck, should he mummy? Because f*ck really is a bad word, isn't it? F*ck is a bad word. He said f*ck. He did.

Ha! Children surely do learn by example (my friend and I were studying for our final child psychology degree exam that day, adding some extra poignancy to his little outburst). :bigsmile:

His friends had bet him that he couldn't say the F word 10 times without getting grounded. We thought that was quite an ingenious approach to the challenge. He couldn't, as it turned out. ;))
 

Cehrabehra

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I personally think the whole swearing thing is ridiculous. I can do way more damage using words that kindergarteners are learning to spell than by dropping fbombs in a playful manner. I don't considerer those words "bad" words, but I do succumb to societal norms enough to consider them "adult" words. I do not let my children use them and I explain why. I explain why *I* don't use them in certain circumstances - like around other people's children. I really don't care at all if my children use those words once they are adults and have a complete understanding of when it is appropriate and when it isn't. If I'm around all adults and I feel like saying one, I will. If they don't like it they are welcome to censor themselves out of my life. I don't go around saying them for shock value and I don't go out of my way to offend anyone, but I have absolutely nothing against them and have no problem saying them around my children. I don't say them TO my children though. I don't think that's appropriate. My daughter never had any issues respecting the boundary (just last night at almost 17 she was quoting something we just watched on tv and saying witch instead of bitch and I laughed and told her she was old enough to use it in context like that, but that it wouldn't be appropriate for her to say it around her brothers (who don't understand the boundaries fully yet) or to say it TO someone, ie calling someone names.

Looking someone in the eye and saying, "I don't like you. I think your face is ugly and I think your soul is ugly. I hope you die." is *WAY* worse than shouting, "F*ck you biotch" across the table at your friend while playing a heated and slightly drunken game of cards.

It isn't the words, it's the meaning - and meaning is what you attribute to it quite often.
 

mayerling

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Cehrabehra|1307359766|2938801 said:
I personally think the whole swearing thing is ridiculous. I can do way more damage using words that kindergarteners are learning to spell than by dropping fbombs in a playful manner. I don't considerer those words "bad" words, but I do succumb to societal norms enough to consider them "adult" words. I do not let my children use them and I explain why. I explain why *I* don't use them in certain circumstances - like around other people's children. I really don't care at all if my children use those words once they are adults and have a complete understanding of when it is appropriate and when it isn't. If I'm around all adults and I feel like saying one, I will. If they don't like it they are welcome to censor themselves out of my life. I don't go around saying them for shock value and I don't go out of my way to offend anyone, but I have absolutely nothing against them and have no problem saying them around my children. I don't say them TO my children though. I don't think that's appropriate. My daughter never had any issues respecting the boundary (just last night at almost 17 she was quoting something we just watched on tv and saying witch instead of bitch and I laughed and told her she was old enough to use it in context like that, but that it wouldn't be appropriate for her to say it around her brothers (who don't understand the boundaries fully yet) or to say it TO someone, ie calling someone names.

Looking someone in the eye and saying, "I don't like you. I think your face is ugly and I think your soul is ugly. I hope you die." is *WAY* worse than shouting, "F*ck you biotch" across the table at your friend while playing a heated and slightly drunken game of cards.

It isn't the words, it's the meaning - and meaning is what you attribute to it quite often.

This isn't criticism directed at anyone, just an attempt to understand the reasoning behind the use. Is it really "appropriate" to drop the f-bomb just for stubbing your toe? Seriously? It's just a stubbed toe!
 

Cehrabehra

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mrs jam|1307317635|2938596 said:
I am the queen of "Cheese and rice; got dandruff! Some of it itches!!" Whenever I'm feeling cranky or frustrated, saying my "faux" swear phrases out loud usually makes me laugh, and I can usually kick my bad mood or thoughts to the curb. For me, I find that using the real potty words just exacerbates a bad mood rather than relieves it.

So no, I don't usually swear in front of kids because I don't do a lot of swearing, in general.

see I don't see how this is any better... you're still swearing. when you say "some of it itches" instead of "son of a bitch" everyone KNOWS your meaning, KNOWS what you are saying and in their mind they translate it anyway... what have you saved? You aren't fooling anyone. You meant it just the same as if you'd said son of a bitch. I agree it's funnier - but sometimes using the original words is funnier too ;-)

This is where I start REALLY thinking that people can be way too uptight about this stuff. When you start convincing yourself that substituting other words makes it mean something else. It doesn't. You're still swearing - you're just using fluffy words to do so.

Not picking on you Mrs Jam ;-) Just using this as a jump off point :)
 

Cehrabehra

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mayerling - I can't think of a MORE appropriate time to drop the fbomb!
 

hawaiianorangetree

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mayerling|1307360096|2938805 said:
Cehrabehra|1307359766|2938801 said:
I personally think the whole swearing thing is ridiculous. I can do way more damage using words that kindergarteners are learning to spell than by dropping fbombs in a playful manner. I don't considerer those words "bad" words, but I do succumb to societal norms enough to consider them "adult" words. I do not let my children use them and I explain why. I explain why *I* don't use them in certain circumstances - like around other people's children. I really don't care at all if my children use those words once they are adults and have a complete understanding of when it is appropriate and when it isn't. If I'm around all adults and I feel like saying one, I will. If they don't like it they are welcome to censor themselves out of my life. I don't go around saying them for shock value and I don't go out of my way to offend anyone, but I have absolutely nothing against them and have no problem saying them around my children. I don't say them TO my children though. I don't think that's appropriate. My daughter never had any issues respecting the boundary (just last night at almost 17 she was quoting something we just watched on tv and saying witch instead of bitch and I laughed and told her she was old enough to use it in context like that, but that it wouldn't be appropriate for her to say it around her brothers (who don't understand the boundaries fully yet) or to say it TO someone, ie calling someone names.

Looking someone in the eye and saying, "I don't like you. I think your face is ugly and I think your soul is ugly. I hope you die." is *WAY* worse than shouting, "F*ck you biotch" across the table at your friend while playing a heated and slightly drunken game of cards.

It isn't the words, it's the meaning - and meaning is what you attribute to it quite often.

This isn't criticism directed at anyone, just an attempt to understand the reasoning behind the use. Is it really "appropriate" to drop the f-bomb just for stubbing your toe? Seriously? It's just a stubbed toe!

Hmm, I could be making this up but I'm sure I read or heard somewhere about a study of people using the f bomb in circumstances like this and they found that the users would release endorphins or 'something' that would help lessen the pain of the injury. Using the f Bomb helps lessen pain apparently! (I'm pretty sure I didn't make that up :cheeky: )
 

mrs jam

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Cehrabehra|1307360170|2938807 said:
mrs jam|1307317635|2938596 said:
I am the queen of "Cheese and rice; got dandruff! Some of it itches!!" Whenever I'm feeling cranky or frustrated, saying my "faux" swear phrases out loud usually makes me laugh, and I can usually kick my bad mood or thoughts to the curb. For me, I find that using the real potty words just exacerbates a bad mood rather than relieves it.

So no, I don't usually swear in front of kids because I don't do a lot of swearing, in general.

see I don't see how this is any better... you're still swearing. when you say "some of it itches" instead of "son of a bitch" everyone KNOWS your meaning, KNOWS what you are saying and in their mind they translate it anyway... what have you saved? You aren't fooling anyone. You meant it just the same as if you'd said son of a bitch. I agree it's funnier - but sometimes using the original words is funnier too ;-)

This is where I start REALLY thinking that people can be way too uptight about this stuff. When you start convincing yourself that substituting other words makes it mean something else. It doesn't. You're still swearing - you're just using fluffy words to do so.

Not picking on you Mrs Jam ;-) Just using this as a jump off point :)

Very good point. My faux cussing is done aloud when I'm by myself without an audience, like when I've just swiffered the living room floor, only to have our huge slobber monster shake his drooly jowls everywhere! For me, it's a silly way to keep myself from becoming grouchy. Kind of immature and goofy, yes, but works for me.

I grew up hearing an adult using swear words in frustration. Never directed at me, but it used to make me feel like I needed to walk around on eggshells around that particular person. I guess I was overly sensitive, but to this day, it makes my stomach turn a bit to hear someone use foul language to express anger or frustration. It doesn't bother me when certain words are said in a playful manner or in jest. To use the words in anger, though, usually tends to heighten bad feelings.
 

princesss

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I have on accident if I don't realize there's a kid around, and will generally apologize if I do. I've got a dirty mouth and I know it, haha, but I try not to let loose around little ones. They've got enough time to pick up their own bad habits later.

ETA: I was talking about swearing with a friend of mine, and (much to my surprise) she said that she really encourages swearing. Apparently she read a study that said that as a group, people who swear are less stressed than people who don't, becuase it can act like a pressure release valve. So swearing when you stub your toe, or when something makes you angry lets you get out the frustration immediately so you can get on with life. I've yet to read the study myself (man I miss my JSTOR access), but I thought it was entertaining/interesting.
 

luv2sparkle

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I don't use a lot of bad language so it has never been a big problem. Once, when my kids were little, I got pulled over for a traffic
stop and I said Sh*t, and boy did I never hear the end of it. Since then nary a damn has passed my lips in front of them.

I don't want my sons using profane language, so how could I?
 

nfowife

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I try speak in front of my kids and to my kids in the manner I want them to speak. But in fits of anger or frustration, yes, they have heard me say sh!t and f*ck. I just try to keep it on very rare occasions.
 

Cehrabehra

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Mrs jam - I love the way you use them to make you smile - that's a great response :)
 

Cehrabehra

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charbie|1307315137|2938576 said:
I find myself sometimes struggling to remain PC in front of my friends kids...even mild "curse" words! I don't plan to make swearing a habit around my kids, though I know it will happen. I always could tell when my mom or dad was really mad if a swear word popped put.

My aunt always tells the story of her daughter as a very young child uttering, "Damnit Donna!" after my aunt did something. They were in public but it was apparent my cousin had no idea what she was saying and how it was said perfectly in context. My aunt was mortified and decided to curb both hers and my uncles language at that point.


hehe - my early years we lived in an apartment that was directly attached to a beauty salon my mom owned (hit the reception desk turn left - house, turn right, ladies in chairs - our living room doubled sometimes as a sitting room and in the back there was a porch that connected our kitchen to the back door of the salon) Anyway, I *owned* the place and the women all knew me and got a huge kick out of me learning to walk etc. But one day I came tearing through at about 2.5 yrs, "Where's that f*cking cat? Where's that f*cking cat?" hehe - my mom was MORTIFIED!!
 

TravelingGal

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No I don't swear in front of my kid, nor do I appreciate it when other people swear in front of her. I don't want her to swear either. I want to keep up my delusion that my child is innocent and pure. I know she won't have sex until she's 35 too.
 

UnluckyTwin

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lbbaber|1307324203|2938647 said:
swingirl|1307317880|2938600 said:
UnluckyTwin|1307313298|2938566 said:
swingirl|1307312458|2938563 said:
I rarely swear. My husband and I made a conscious effort not to use foul language or name calling around our children. We told them that people who swear don't have a good enough vocabulary to express themselves. Everyone, of course, learns the words and goes through a stage of using them for emphasis but I wanted our kids to know it's not an acceptable way to communicate. I am happy to report that although our kids, who are now young adults, certainly say a few choice words to their friends, they respect their parents and family enough that there's is no potty mouth around us.

Kids learn by example.

I understand that everyone has the right to use the language they deem appropriate in their own homes, and every parent has the right to teach their children what to say or not say. But I find this kind of reasoning offensive, because it's simply untrue of those of us who are plenty articulate and use swear words to express exactly the kinds of things that can't be expressed with other words. Children can be taught their parents' ideas, but they don't need to be taught in such a way that puts down others who have different ideas, or in a way that contradicts empirical evidence. Just my $0.02.
There is no reason for you to be offended. The psychology used to raise my kids wasn't meant to be politically correct so that no outsider gets offended. Certainly, my adult children know there are a great many brilliant well-spoken people who still need to express their anger using the f word. But they were brought up to consider foul language rude and often sexist, since quite a few swear words have to do with anatomy and gender.

Swingirl, I worked in a children and adolescent's psych. hospital for 7 year before I recently quit to become a SAHM...that explanation IS EXACTLY what we taught our patients on the unit. They wanted to know "why" swearing was not allowed and we were instructed to tell them 1. It's not polight/inappropriate and 2. there are better ways to express one's anger /frustration. ...."use your words". The teens would try to throw out arguments as to why it should be allowed but bottom line, if they go into a job or college interview cursing like a truck driver they will not make a good impression.

I do not curse in front of my children although I have slipped a few times. I do believe that kids learn from example so I try my best to model good behavior. Swearing, IMO, is inappropriate. Words are a powerful tool. I would like to think that am teaching them to choose them wisely.

I'm not highly offended or anything--just enough to say this without making it a big deal.

I see multiple explanations for children in these two comments:
1. Swearing is rude and sexist--I don't always agree with the "rude" part, but I do hate sexist language. Not only do I hate the word "bitch" because it's sexist, but I even police my (close-enough-to-forgive-my-policing) friends when they say "hey guys" to a mixed-sex or all-female group. Teaching children not to use sexist swear words is, I think, the right thing to do.
2. There are "better" ways to express anger than cursing--a subjective statement we could debate, but certainly a valid perspective.
3. You won't do well in a job interview if you can't censor your language--absolutely, I agree.
4. Words are powerful so choose wisely--I couldn't agree more.

But all of these are different than teaching children that those who swear are lesser-than because they don't have good vocabularies. It teaches children A. an incorrect "fact" and B. that they are superior to people with different beliefs. I think giving children the 4 reasons above is plenty enough reason for them not to curse (yet) without having to resort to belittling others.
 

Pandora II

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Aug 3, 2006
Messages
9,613
mayerling|1307360096|2938805 said:
This isn't criticism directed at anyone, just an attempt to understand the reasoning behind the use. Is it really "appropriate" to drop the f-bomb just for stubbing your toe? Seriously? It's just a stubbed toe!

It's not something that you think about, it's just automatic.

Interestingly, if you are becoming bilingual in another language, the last remaining parts of your mother tongue are counting out money and the swear-words you use when you stub your toe or similar. I spoke fluent Italian after living there for 2 years but it wasn't till I'd been there nearly 5 before I'd count money out in Italian and say Cazzo instead of Bugger when stubbing my toes.
 

mayerling

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Mar 4, 2010
Messages
2,357
Pandora|1307375129|2938971 said:
mayerling|1307360096|2938805 said:
This isn't criticism directed at anyone, just an attempt to understand the reasoning behind the use. Is it really "appropriate" to drop the f-bomb just for stubbing your toe? Seriously? It's just a stubbed toe!

It's not something that you think about, it's just automatic.

Interestingly, if you are becoming bilingual in another language, the last remaining parts of your mother tongue are counting out money and the swear-words you use when you stub your toe or similar. I spoke fluent Italian after living there for 2 years but it wasn't till I'd been there nearly 5 before I'd count money out in Italian and say Cazzo instead of Bugger when stubbing my toes.

Actually, I'm more likely to swear in English than in my native language. Mental counting, yes, definitely in my native language.
 

princesss

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Mar 18, 2007
Messages
8,035
Pandora|1307375129|2938971 said:
mayerling|1307360096|2938805 said:
This isn't criticism directed at anyone, just an attempt to understand the reasoning behind the use. Is it really "appropriate" to drop the f-bomb just for stubbing your toe? Seriously? It's just a stubbed toe!

It's not something that you think about, it's just automatic.

Interestingly, if you are becoming bilingual in another language, the last remaining parts of your mother tongue are counting out money and the swear-words you use when you stub your toe or similar. I spoke fluent Italian after living there for 2 years but it wasn't till I'd been there nearly 5 before I'd count money out in Italian and say Cazzo instead of Bugger when stubbing my toes.

Living in Spain, I found this to be so true! The one word that I did adopt pretty quickly was "joder" - easier to express disgust/frustration than its English counterpart, which is better for anger/surprise (the good ol' f-bomb).
 
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