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Do you still write personal checks every month?

Rubymal

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Feb 27, 2019
Messages
248
I paid half my wedding vendors with checks because they charged extra for cc payment (even though, they are technically not supposed to, but I'm not the credit card company here).
 

msop04

Ideal_Rock
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Joined
Dec 3, 2011
Messages
9,768
The only checks I write are to the housekeeper (twice a month) and the girl who keeps my child after daycare until I can get off work (weekly)... so literally 6 checks a month.

I'm so lazy. I hate writing checks. I even get annoyed at work when I've been filling a script for someone, and they don't start to fill out their check until I call them to the register. Then they act as if they need to win some award with their handwriting... or maybe compete for the slowest check writer of all time, IDK. Same thing at the grocery. LOL :lol:
 

doberman

Brilliant_Rock
Premium
Joined
Mar 2, 2012
Messages
1,640
I still have a few things I have to write checks for: lawn service and sprinkler system come to mind. They dont take plastic unfortunately. Everything else I possibly can, I do through online banking or online payment. I got a parking ticket and it was lucky I had a check in my wallet because the town halls around here don't take plastic; we need checks for our taxes as well.
 

OoohShiny

Ideal_Rock
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Apr 25, 2014
Messages
7,062
I got a parking ticket and it was lucky I had a check in my wallet because the town halls around here don't take plastic; we need checks for our taxes as well.
I went into a shop the other day with 50 quid in my hand, ready to buy something from them.

The sign said 'we are a cashless shop'.

I walked out again and spent (more) on a similar thing elsewhere.
 

cflutist

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jul 12, 2004
Messages
3,891
One check per month for the gardener.
Four checks for property taxes per year.
 

kenny

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Joined
Apr 30, 2005
Messages
27,745
I went into a shop the other day with 50 quid in my hand, ready to buy something from them.

The sign said 'we are a cashless shop'.

I walked out again and spent (more) on a similar thing elsewhere.
Good for you. :clap:

And, I hope you told the owner/manager why your money went to their competitor ... and also told their competitor why they did get your money, in case they're considering going cashless too.

Even if cashless is inevitible I won't go down without a fight, which may delay doomsday a bit.
 
Last edited:

telephone89

Ideal_Rock
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I applaud any business that goes cashless. It's MUCH safer for employees. I'm also suspicious of businesses who are cash only or give large discounts for cash, since that means they may not be paying proper taxes.
 

OoohShiny

Ideal_Rock
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I applaud any business that goes cashless. It's MUCH safer for employees. I'm also suspicious of businesses who are cash only or give large discounts for cash, since that means they may not be paying proper taxes.
I understand where you are coming from re: employee safety but are hold-ups that common? Over here in the UK it is rare to hear of such things - they do happen, of course, but as we don't have firearms in general circulation, we don't have so many issues with their undesirable use. Not to say that knife crime in some cities isn't an issue... but in 'middle England' most people are fortunately only very rarely the victim of crime, and even more rarely the victim of violent crime.

re: the cash = tax avoidance or other suspicious activity thing... 'guilty until proven innocent' seems to be the mentality now? When I said to a chap who lends money for a living that I lived my life paying cash only, he said I'd be hard to lend to because 'it is a cashless society and people only use cash for illegal activities or things they want off the radar' :rolleyes:

Good for you. :clap:

And, I hope you told the owner/manager why your money went to their competitor ... and also told their competitor why they did get your money, in case they're considering going cashless too.

Even if cashless is inevitible I won't go down without a fight, which may delay doomsday a bit.
I was trying to get a mobile communications device and SIM card for occasional use. At this moment in time we are permitted :rolleyes: to buy such things anonymously and with cash, but I understand that the police are asking for their sales to be stopped, on the basis that 'County Lines' drug gangs use them as part of their networking.

Of course, this ignores the fact that they are a tiny, tiiiiny number of users in a country of 60million people and will just swap to WhatsApp or Facebook or A.N.Other service with end-to-end encryption :rolleyes: and it will instead inconvenience those of us who just want to have such things for occasional use or temporary use, or even just because we don't want yet another tracked and logged method of communication...


[awaits tin foil hat / 'what are you up to' comments]
 

kenny

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Joined
Apr 30, 2005
Messages
27,745
I use online payment for prop taxe
... I was trying to get a mobile communications device and SIM card for occasional use.
Sorry, but I have no idea what this is, or what it has to do with going cashless.
Is a mobile communications device just a smartphone, or any cellphone, or some other thing(s)?

Next, I know what a SIM card is, it stores data.
My Nikon uses one, but what does a SIM card have to do with going cashless?

???
 

mom2dolls

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Sep 3, 2015
Messages
128
We wrote a check to a home warranty repair company last year when our garage door broke. This guy washed the check and tried to pay for his insurance premium for the year with our money! Thankfully the insurance company caught the difference in signature for my husband. We will pay with cash or cc for everything.
 

OoohShiny

Ideal_Rock
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Apr 25, 2014
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7,062
I use online payment for prop taxe


Sorry, but I have no idea what this is, or what it has to do with going cashless.
Is a mobile communications device just a smartphone, or any cellphone, or some other thing(s)?

Next, I know what a SIM card is, it stores data.
My Nikon uses one, but what does a SIM card have to do with going cashless?

???
With apologies for my half-explained rant :lol: and for telling you things you likely already know, and in no way wishing to sound condescending or 'mansplaining'... :)

We have 'normal' mobile (cell) phones, 'smart' :rolleyes: phones, and also mobile broadband devices, which are basically a data-only SIM card in a small plastic device. The latter is switched on, connects to the mobile/cell network, and then one can connect to the device using wi-fi - e.g. connect your laptop to it for surfing the internet if you don't have wired internet at home or don't want to use (insecure) coffee shop wi-fi, for example.

Most SIM cards in these devices are tied to a 12/18/24/36 month contract that is paid for out of your bank account, and to get one involves a 'hard' Credit Search going on your Credit File and a binding financial contract you cannot break without paying the full amount they expect to collect over the term of the contract, which can mean some sectors of society are unable to get a cheap contract (or any contract) due to their credit history.

At the moment, though, one can purchase the above devices and 'Pay As You Go' (i.e. 'no contract') SIM cards cheaply from shops using cash, and then 'top up' with credit by purchasing 'top ups' using cash. (They are invariably considerably more expensive, of course, because we wouldn't want to encourage the peasants to be anonymous, would we, and have to make sure the poor people are punished for being poor :rolleyes:)

All of these devices/SIM cards on all the mobile/cellular network providers have their use tracked and recorded - their unique IMEI device reference number, GPS locations, internet sites visited, phone numbers called, text messages sent (all the info in them, not just the number sent to)...

None of us in the UK signed up for this - it was decreed by Government that such data/records should be kept for at least two years, along with data from number plate cameras on the highway network - so if they remove the ability to purchase mobile/cell SIM cards and devices with cash, they effectively remove the ability to communicate anonymously.
 

telephone89

Ideal_Rock
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Aug 29, 2014
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3,664
@OoohShiny You might like this link that is more UK specific https://www.acs.org.uk/sites/default/files/acs_crimereport2019_online_version.pdf
But basically yes, it is definitely an issue. In several cities in Canada (western at least), thieves are getting more violent and more brazen. In Winnipeg I can name more than 10 people who've been bear sprayed, threatened with machetes, guns pulled, etc. And that's only one major city facing these issues. I've heard people mention the drug/opiod epidemic as a possible cause, but either way, it is dangerous for employees working on the front line.
Cashless wouldn't solve everything, but it certainly makes the EMPLOYEE less of a target. Cashless is also safer for a business FROM its employees. No cash for employees to steal!
 

voce

Ideal_Rock
Joined
May 13, 2018
Messages
2,898
@telephone89 I think that safety is a good reason for places to go cashless, but I would miss the tradition of giving and receiving cash gifts to/from family and friends during holidays.

Moreover, a cashless system would lead to more financial incompetence, particularly for younger generations. Behavioral economics shows that people are more responsible with their money when spending cash, not swiping their phones or cards. I would want my kids to learn addition and subtraction by counting/finding change.
 

telephone89

Ideal_Rock
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Aug 29, 2014
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@voce Interesting points. IMO giving cash as a gift isn't very traditional or thoughtful, but everyone does like money LOL.
As far as financial responsibility, I think we could be doing A LOT more for kids. Who TF needs to learn vectors and antiderivitives, but have no idea how to do taxes? And it is very easy to ignore the glaring $0 in your bank account when your credit card keeps spending, for sure.
 

voce

Ideal_Rock
Joined
May 13, 2018
Messages
2,898
@telephone89 in the part of the world where my family is from, red envelopes are always stuffed with cash. People are supposed to visit friends and family for the New Year, and every time they visit another house, it's considered polite to bring a gift. Red envelopes for the little ones are much easier to carry on your person than any other form of a tangible gift, especially when you might visit a dozen households on that day. Now, I as a jewelry lover, would of course love it if red envelopes were stuffed with gems instead, but gems don't stay flat and will abrade one another. Cash is the most practical option. If little kids whip out their phones for an electronic fund transfer, I would weep. That would mean no excitement of receiving something in a lucky red envelope, and it would mean kids are completely dependent on smartphones.

When you use real cash to play Monopoly, the psychological perception is different, so people make decisions differently. The same thing is true using cash for purchases.
 

kenny

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Joined
Apr 30, 2005
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27,745
Of course I care about employee safety but many jobs you and I benefit from present higher risk to employees than cash does to retail cashiers.

Here's the top 5 you should stop using and benefiting from before you support retail businesses going cashless.

#1 Logger is the most dangerous job, but good luck eliminating wood from your life. Wood is everywhere.

#2 Fishers - I'm not giving up fish and other seafood.

#3 Aircraft pilots and aircraft engineers - I don't fly any more, but for green reasons, not because it kills pilots. Have you stopped flying to save pilots' lives?

#4 Roofers - I like having a good roof on my house. I guess I'm a selfish jerk. Did you install your own roof?

#5 Trash collectors - I guess I should just let it build up in my backyard.

But the biggest reason I use cash is privacy.
Loss of privacy is a problem that few people today understand.
 

telephone89

Ideal_Rock
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@voce Ah totally right, apologies and please excuse my ignorance! Red envelopes are very common and traditional for many cultures :) One can still give/receive cash, and deposit it just like depositing a cheque (or at least, the olden day version of depositing before taking a picture of it!).
 

telephone89

Ideal_Rock
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Of course I care about employee safety but many jobs you and I benefit from present higher risk to employees than cash does to retail cashiers.

Here's the top 5 you should stop using and benefiting from before retail businesses that have gone cashless.

#1 Logger is the most dangerous job, but good luck eliminating wood from your life It's everywhere.

#2 Fishers - I'm not giving up fish and other seafood.

#3 Aircraft pilots and aircraft engineers - I don't fly any more, but for green reasons, not because it kills pilots. Have you stopped flying to save pilots' lives?

#4 Roofers - I like having a good roof on my house. I guess I'm a selfish jerk. Did you install your own roof?

#5 Trash collectors - I guess I should just let it build up in my backyard.
Huh? How is trying to make ONE aspect of many employees lives safer disregarding safety of others? Shitty strawman argument.
 

kenny

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Huh? How is trying to make ONE aspect of many employees lives safer disregarding safety of others? Shitty strawman argument.
How am I, "disregarding safety of others" by pointing out that other jobs (the benefit of which we are not giving up) are more dangerous?

Again, protecting my privacy by using cash is very important and few understand what's happening today.
 

telephone89

Ideal_Rock
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How am I, "disregarding safety of others" by pointing out that other jobs (the benefit of which we are not giving up) are more dangerous?

Again, protecting my privacy by using cash is very important and few understand what's happening today.
I didn't say you were disregarding safety of anyone. I just praised a business for making a decision that benefits employee safety. I, personally, think it's great. You don't. Ok cool. Whats your catch phrase again? I feel it would fit great here!
 

VRBeauty

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Apr 2, 2006
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10,189
@voce Interesting points. IMO giving cash as a gift isn't very traditional or thoughtful, but everyone does like money LOL.
Apparently you’ve never had the good fortune to receive - or give - lucky money!
 

telephone89

Ideal_Rock
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Apparently you’ve never had the good fortune to receive - or give - lucky money!
I haven't! But I did correct myself and apologize. In *my* culture, giving cash is looked at as thoughtless and rude, like you didn't care enough to go buy an actual gift. But it was my mistake to think everyone is from that culture! Obviously it is very common in many others.
TBH I still like getting it as a gift though. I have too much *stuff* already!
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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31,399
I haven't! But I did correct myself and apologize. In *my* culture, giving cash is looked at as thoughtless and rude, like you didn't care enough to go buy an actual gift. But it was my mistake to think everyone is from that culture! Obviously it is very common in many others.
TBH I still like getting it as a gift though. I have too much *stuff* already!
Honestly, I love getting cash as a gift. When I was younger my parents were worried I would be disappointed not to unwrap a surprise gift but the truth is I am very hard to buy for so getting cash was the perfect gift for me. And in our culture and region we give cash gifts at weddings, graduations etc. And we always give cash as a gift to all our service people. I know they appreciate it and can use it over a gift generally.

A couple of quick rules I think apply (IMO)

1. NEVER ask for cash as a gift
2. ALWAYS send a thank you note
(for any gift)

Also, I keep in mind what the recipient wants. People who rather get a gift vs cash always get a gift and something that they want. Not something I would want. To me, a gift is for the recipient and should reflect their desires.
 

OoohShiny

Ideal_Rock
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@OoohShiny You might like this link that is more UK specific https://www.acs.org.uk/sites/default/files/acs_crimereport2019_online_version.pdf
But basically yes, it is definitely an issue. In several cities in Canada (western at least), thieves are getting more violent and more brazen. In Winnipeg I can name more than 10 people who've been bear sprayed, threatened with machetes, guns pulled, etc. And that's only one major city facing these issues. I've heard people mention the drug/opiod epidemic as a possible cause, but either way, it is dangerous for employees working on the front line.
Cashless wouldn't solve everything, but it certainly makes the EMPLOYEE less of a target. Cashless is also safer for a business FROM its employees. No cash for employees to steal!
I do appreciate that risk is risk, and everyone's tolerance and appetite for risk is different, but businesses must surely be the safest they've ever been, what with most transactions being electronic and CCTV carpet-bombed across any public area nowadays!

Of course, as we all know, CCTV doesn't stop a crime from happening :rolleyes: it just means the police have someone to prosecute easily... Personally I'd rather society removed the need for crime, so that I and others weren't the victim of crime, instead of watching everyone 24/7 like criminals in prison, 'just in case' the average Jo/e has a really bad day and flips out at someone in the street and becomes an easy prosecution for 'breach of the peace' or whatever, or gets stuck in a yellow-box junction in their car or does 36 in a 30 limit at 3am and gets fined by an automated camera with no discretion for an inconsequential action, meanwhile career criminals laugh at the pathetic sentencing given to them for their deeds that cost the public greatly in terms of both financial and emotional impacts.


Anyway, I'm going off topic :lol:


I would perhaps propose that just because you can't steal cash and walk out the door with it as an employee, or have it taken from you by threat of violence, don't think there isn't other ways for businesses to be stolen from - an employee could, in theory, setup a fake account with a card machine paying into it, and then spend the day swiping customer's cards into that machine/account before disappearing before closing time, stealing the entire day's takings...

Criminals - solving problems and getting results for thousands of years! :lol:
 

LinSF

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Aug 21, 2018
Messages
449
Ironically I write more checks now than I ever have- HOA, ex, children's school tuition, dr payments outside insurance. There's no difference fraudwise, it's just slower to hit you! I also highly utilize electronic payments, these checks are necessary although inconvenient.
 
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