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Do you have anxiety attacks?

random_thought

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jul 5, 2010
Messages
1,065
How do you deal with them?

I've been off my anxiety and anti-depressants for only a week and I'm struggling. I got laid off in July and then had to spend our money on my dad's funeral so I don't have much to use to go to a psychiatrist and my general doctor won't refill my prescription without a new diagnosis of bi-polar and anxiety. I'm waiting for a call back about doctors who work on a sliding scale. The only one I know of isn't taking new patients :(sad

In the meantime, we are in the middle of trying to sell my parent's house and one sister is making it really difficult. She has always been like this and is very difficult to be around. I'm constantly having anxiety attacks because of her and I'm trying to find a natural way to get rid of them until back on medication. Does any one have any suggestions?
 

random_thought

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
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Messages
1,065
Read this online and it helps, maybe it will help someone else....

Realize you cannot control other people. They are going to do the crazy, stupid, incorrect things they are going to do. You can’t force them to do anything else. You can’t force someone to stop being lazy or lying to you. The only person you can control is you. You get to decide how much you’re going to let this person’s behavior impact you. Your worrying, obsessing, venting, etc. has zero impact on them – and only hurts you.
 

OreoRosies86

Ideal_Rock
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Messages
3,032
Yes I do. Medication does help to an extent but a lot of it cycles around diet, excercise, and proper sleep.
 

Puppmom

Ideal_Rock
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Messages
3,160
Hi, RT. I don't but DH does (this is a new-ish thing for him). He has been getting acupuncture and cupping and taking some Chinese medicine. He also sees a therapist and meditates (transcendental). He tried prescription medication twice and it didn't work well for him either time. He's open to it but wanted to try alternatives in the meantime.

He says the acupuncture helps as does the therapist but feels the meditation makes the greatest difference. And...it's free!

I know everyone is different but this is what works for him. It's still a work in progress and some days are better than others but we both notice a difference.
 

random_thought

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
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Messages
1,065
The meditation isn't a bad idea, thank you for reminding me of that. I used to be really into yoga but let it slip to the side over the years.
 

tyty333

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Joined
Dec 17, 2008
Messages
21,672
Hi RT,
You are going through so much right now...I really feel for you. I started having panic attacks after the birth of my first child.
I think the lack of quality sleep and the second guessing whether I was doing everything right really got to me. Over the years
I have learned a few small things that really helped me and are worth giving a try.

When I feel a panic attack start to come on I start exercising. Jumping jacks, running in place, swinging your arms ...any
thing to help use up that extra adrenaline that hits your system. This is also why exercise in general helps me with anxiety.
It helps to wear my body out so it seems I have less adrenaline in my system to cause an attack.

The other thing that helped/helps was a large ice-pack shoulder wrap I made. I used a leg off of a pair of girls size 6 jeans. Sewed
in 3 ice packs...keep it in the freezer. The first place I usually feel my body reacting when I'm feeling panicky is my neck and
shoulders. When I get that feeling I grab my ice-pack wrap and throw it on my shoulders. The coldness sort of deadens
any panicky feelings I get in my neck/shoulders.

Including a pic of my lovely ice pack wrap. I used the ice packs that are in the picture to put in my wrap. There are 2x4
rows in the 3 sections of the wrap. This wrap also works great for hot flashes...if there is anyone out there dealing with those.


You need to do whatever you can to get back on your medications. I'm sorry you have to deal with a sister that is making things
difficult. Seems like every family has one. :roll:
tyty

2016-09-12_12.jpg
 

the_mother_thing

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Mar 2, 2013
Messages
6,044
Very sorry to hear about the goings-on in your life, adding to your stress & anxiety. I hope those issues resolve soon so you can discover some peace in your life and focus on your well-being.

I'd echo others recommendations for exercise and restful sleep. I suffered with anxiety/panic attacks related to driving as well as a few other stresses going on in my life. By developing a diligent exercise regimen as well as making some spiritual changes in my life, I was able to drop ALL the meds (daily and situational) related to my anxiety, and I no longer have the attacks. Walking to music (vs. thinking about my stress triggers while walking) and doing yoga daily before & after bed work as great stress relievers for me.

Best of luck to you!
 

lovedogs

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Jul 31, 2014
Messages
10,477
I'm so sorry about this! You definitely shouldn't have to be without your medications. What about a free or low cost clinic in your area? Sometimes they can help with mental health type stuff. Also sometimes psychiatrists/psychologists see patients for free (pro bono) if someone needs services but cannot pay. Especially if you are in a "crisis", which is how I would likely classify this since you had to go off medication due to finances and are experiencing panic attacks. I'm really surprised your original prescribing psychiatrist didn't try to help with this....have you tried asking or calling them? Because none would advocate going off medication due to costs, especially with those diagnoses.

But beyond medication I agree that physical activity and meditation can help, but neither will replace medicine if that's what's worked for you in the past.

I really hope you find a solution!! If there were a PM function I'd be happy to help more...I'm in the mental health field and it hurts to see someone struggling due to circumstances out of their control. HUGS!!!!
 

ruby59

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Feb 5, 2004
Messages
3,553
How long have you been on your medication for anxiety. Abruptly stopping it is unwise and should be done under a doctor's care.
 

the_mother_thing

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Mar 2, 2013
Messages
6,044
Some drug manufacturers do offer programs to assist people who are unable to pay for their medications. Maybe reach out to them for possible assistance with covering the cost of the medicine, which may make it less overwhelming getting into the doctor; at least it may be less out of pocket expense.

I know my community has a few low-cost/sliding scale mental health clinics available. Perhaps look up your county's department of health, and ask them if there are any nearby you can contact for assistance.
 

vintagelover229

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jan 23, 2008
Messages
3,517
I have dealt with it for years. While medicated it wasn't good. Off medications after the initial shock to my system and learning healthier coping skills things are much better. Don't be hard on yourself, it will take quite some time for your body to adjust to being off medication, some of the side affects of coming off of them are actually the same symptoms they are designed to help. There will be a learning curve and spend time learning different techniques to cope with them. Racing thoughts were terrible but shooting them down and doing positive thoughts (took MONTHS) but now my mind doesn't race. Some days are better than others, but its been 5 years since I've had an attack. I used to have them BAD-as in curled in the fetal position, hyper ventilating, thoughts racing, totally crazy town attacks. Your not alone-but I do believe you are strong enough to overcome them without medication but you have to really want to go that route. There will be days better than others and certain things will trigger things and certain things will help more than others with coping but just don't feel like since you are off of them and feel overwhelmed more so than you were on-that that's not normal. It totally is normal, and it will take time for you and your body to figure out how to deal with the feelings that they helped curb for a while. But that is OKAY and is expected. Learning your triggers is a big one, as well as learning how to stop the escalation once the trigger occurs takes trial and error (at least it did for me). For example-something with trigger (for me abandonment issues, thinking my bf was going to leave me bc I was crazy) so any sort of concerned constructive criticisms to help me heal would send me into an attack. I had to learn to tell myself that most of these thoughts are lies, that I was lovable/etc/etc until I was able to calm down. Having discussions with him was hard since our communication styles were totally different as well as my skewed unhealthy view of relationships as well as myself I took as personal attack on me and got into defence mode. But after learning to take control of my thoughts, I was able to tell myself just bc I was in the wrong-or maybe I wasn't-that I could talk about it and if I felt something bubbling up-inside I would try to talk myself down. Different things worked better than others, again it was trial and error, but I had to learn to tell myself if I wasn't able to prevent the attack that I DID try something different and just bc it didn't work didn't mean I was a failure-just meant that I had to try something different the next time.

I was terrified when I became pregnant. I thought all the hormones would really give me a run for my sanity-since even 'normal' women can go a bit crazy when all the hormones come into play and I hadn't been stable for all that long.

Again, this is my personal experience. Everyone deals and copes differently.

ETA: I didn't read the whole thread. I did NOT realize you aren't taking them bc of a personal choice but a $ one. It is VERY dangerous to go cold turkey off any medication, but even more so SSRI's and similar drugs. Please figure out a way to get to a Dr. to at least help you do the weaning process slowly. You can have some serious SERIOUS side affects of coming off cold turkey including increased suicidal thoughts. Whatever you do, that needs to be #1-your body is going though shock and it's totally expected for you to have increased attacks without having someone to monitor you as well as slowly decreasing the dosage.
 

mom2dolls

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Sep 3, 2015
Messages
143
I suffer from them as well, over the last eight months or so. Exercise is the one thing that keeps them at bay.
I recently went to the doctor and discussed this with him. So far medication is not needed on a regular basis.
I did have my worst about three weeks ago out of the blue at work. I had to leave, went home and took a low dose Xanax. It took the edge off but did not take it away completely.
 

Marquise_Madness

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Feb 28, 2016
Messages
292
Do you have insurance? I know my pharmacy will sometimes do advance payments if I need meds or doctors will do "samples" of meds. Or go to the ER. If the hospital bill is high, it's the hospital's problem.

As for panic attacks, I get them. I vomit, then I try to breathe. I try grounding. You look at something you can touch and focus on it. I'm somebody who wants to be held during them and so I have my fiancé hold me. And then I just try to breathe at a slow rate since I usually breathe too fast and think I'm dying.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

House Cat

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
4,005
Did your doc tell you that the reason he won't prescribe antidepressants to you any longer is because it is very dangerous for someone with bipolar disorder to take antidepressants? The old school of thought was that people with bipolar disorder shouldn't take antidepressants without a mood stabilizer. More progressive psychiatrists are even getting away from that philosophy. Antidepressants cause mood swings and mania. The goal for people with bipolar disorder is to stabilize the mood, not to bring up what is down or to bring down what is up. Inducing mood swings is dangerous business because mood swings kindle. This means that the more mood swings you have, the more you will have and they gain intensity.

I have been doing this bipolar thing for more than twenty years. It is in your best interest to get properly diagnosed. I really hate hearing general practitioners treating ANY mental illness. They aren't qualified or specialized enough to do so. I have seen far too many nightmare medication foul ups on perfectly beautiful people at the hands of a GP who isn't ethical enough to admit that they aren't qualified enough to handle a person's case.


Sleep is the best brain cleanser and refresher that we have. You can get too much sleep, so the goal is to get 8 hours. If your sleep is crazy and anxious and full of thinking, you might need to do some investigating to see if you can do some things to make your sleep quality better. Can you make the room dark? No eating triggering foods before bed or watching triggering tv. No addressing triggering topics before bed, etc. If you have done all of that and you still can't sleep well, I would then try teas for sleep or ask the doc for something for sleep.

If I have a bad night's sleep, I will have an anxious day. If I have several bad nights, I will begin to get manic. Some people become depressed when they have many nights of poor sleep.

You have received many good suggestions here for meditation, exercise, etc.

I do something called EFT. This is where you tap on acupressure points while talking about what is bothering you. It really calms you! It might seem woo woo, but maybe give it a try! Here is a video for how to do it for anxiety.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWu3rSEddZI

I really hope you find something that works for you. <3
 

random_thought

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jul 5, 2010
Messages
1,065
Just wanted to come back and update- my doctor was able to prescribe me a 15 day supply. It's not because she doesn't want to help but federal guidelines won't let her give me anymore without having actual diagnostic paperwork in her hands and my old psychiatrist for whatever reason didn't keep them. I feel much better being back on the meds and am trying to find somewhere that will help me in the meantime. Thank you all for so much feedback, it really helped. I'm sorry I didn't respond sooner, things have just been a bit crazy :errrr:
 

ruby59

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Feb 5, 2004
Messages
3,553
Mediation and other things will work for those who have not used anything else.

But for those on medication, especially for any length of time, it is dangerous to go on and off these meds as it can make your situation even worse.

Your doctor should be trying to get you into a clinic so that you can be evaluated and monitored.

Going off psyche meds abruptly and not under a doctor's care can have a boomerang effect, making your condition even worse.
 

lovedogs

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jul 31, 2014
Messages
10,477
random_thought|1473881760|4076519 said:
Just wanted to come back and update- my doctor was able to prescribe me a 15 day supply. It's not because she doesn't want to help but federal guidelines won't let her give me anymore without having actual diagnostic paperwork in her hands and my old psychiatrist for whatever reason didn't keep them. I feel much better being back on the meds and am trying to find somewhere that will help me in the meantime. Thank you all for so much feedback, it really helped. I'm sorry I didn't respond sooner, things have just been a bit crazy :errrr:
Just FYI unless it's been 6 years (or somewhere in that ballpark), your Psychiatrist shouldnt have not kept records. In fact, psychologists and psychiatrists are required to document and keep paperwork, etc, about treatment for a fairly long time (don't know the exact length for Psychiatry). So if he didn't keep your stuff that's a pretty big mistake on his (or her) part, and they could get in trouble for it. Not that the info helps you, persay, but more to let you know how much this should never happen. I really hope you are able to find somewhere that will allow you to remain on the medication--the more you start and stop the more you have to struggle, which just shouldnt happen period.
 

kenny

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 30, 2005
Messages
28,175
Do I have anxiety attacks?
Is 60 years of continuous anxiety, 24/7/365, an anxiety attack?

What is no anxiety like?
Anxiety-free is the norm?
Who knew?
 

ruby59

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Feb 5, 2004
Messages
3,553
I thought living like that was normal as well.

Until my doctor told me that anxiety releases cortisol which can put a big strain on your heart and is a risk factor for heart disease.
 

diamondseeker2006

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jan 11, 2006
Messages
55,631
House Cat|1473711239|4075612 said:
Did your doc tell you that the reason he won't prescribe antidepressants to you any longer is because it is very dangerous for someone with bipolar disorder to take antidepressants? The old school of thought was that people with bipolar disorder shouldn't take antidepressants without a mood stabilizer. More progressive psychiatrists are even getting away from that philosophy. Antidepressants cause mood swings and mania. The goal for people with bipolar disorder is to stabilize the mood, not to bring up what is down or to bring down what is up. Inducing mood swings is dangerous business because mood swings kindle. This means that the more mood swings you have, the more you will have and they gain intensity.

I have been doing this bipolar thing for more than twenty years. It is in your best interest to get properly diagnosed. I really hate hearing general practitioners treating ANY mental illness. They aren't qualified or specialized enough to do so. I have seen far too many nightmare medication foul ups on perfectly beautiful people at the hands of a GP who isn't ethical enough to admit that they aren't qualified enough to handle a person's case.


Sleep is the best brain cleanser and refresher that we have. You can get too much sleep, so the goal is to get 8 hours. If your sleep is crazy and anxious and full of thinking, you might need to do some investigating to see if you can do some things to make your sleep quality better. Can you make the room dark? No eating triggering foods before bed or watching triggering tv. No addressing triggering topics before bed, etc. If you have done all of that and you still can't sleep well, I would then try teas for sleep or ask the doc for something for sleep.

If I have a bad night's sleep, I will have an anxious day. If I have several bad nights, I will begin to get manic. Some people become depressed when they have many nights of poor sleep.

You have received many good suggestions here for meditation, exercise, etc.

I do something called EFT. This is where you tap on acupressure points while talking about what is bothering you. It really calms you! It might seem woo woo, but maybe give it a try! Here is a video for how to do it for anxiety.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWu3rSEddZI

I really hope you find something that works for you. <3
Oh goodness, this is new information to me (family member). Do you have links that support this? I need to read about this. I will tell you that my family member takes a mood stabilizer and the doctor says it will be a problem not to take an antidepressant with it. And in fact, the person has tried MANY times to slowly (over months) wean off antidepressants and ends up extremely depressed. I hate these meds because you become dependent on them and can't really get off, yet they aren't effective long term anyway!!!! JUst FYI, the person has been to psychiatrists, but in actuality, we get much more personal care from the GP. The psychiatrists we have tried were not much more than prescription writers and couldn't get you in for weeks if you needed to go right away.

To the OP...as others have said, if you have taken these meds for any length of time, it is very dangerous to go off of them cold turkey.
 

madelise

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Sep 23, 2011
Messages
5,294
Yes. I've been in therapy since I was 21, on and off. I only take medication if it is getting unmanageable (i.e., too many anxiety attacks that are debilitating within a short period of time). On a day-to-day basis, I do not get them. I've managed them with coping strategies. I've learned to cry more often than keep it all bottled inside, then spiral out of control. Thus I don't carry around medication, since I wouldn't know when TO take them.

But, for instance, you go through a rough patch with many triggers. I just went through one, or am going through one. At these sorts of times, recognize when you DO need to go on medication. And that it's okay. Allow yourself to be spoiled with extra naps, doing hobbies, getting massages, etc. ANYTHING to help you decompress.

You're going through a rough time also. Just understand you're NOT alone. It happens to the best of us.

---------

I read your updates. I don't understand why your prescribing physician isn't able to diagnose you him/herself with anxiety. Anxiety is NOT uncommon. There are no "tests" he/she can do to prove you have it, as chances are, you aren't exhibiting the signs/symptoms at the moment of your appointments. Jeez Louise. Find another physician!
 

TooPatient

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Sep 1, 2009
Messages
8,887
Haven't read replies yet, but wanted to toss out what helps me. I hope you find something that helps you. They are miserable!

Yoga was one of the best and I need to get back to it (free or cheap are all over or you can do work at studio in exchange)

I also find that reading a good book helps. Something that really sucks me in so my mind/body have a distraction.

A hot cup of tea in a sunny place. This was one of the things I always did with my grandma and it sort of helps pull me into happy memories.
 

diamondseeker2006

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jan 11, 2006
Messages
55,631
madelise|1473914199|4076780 said:
I read your updates. I don't understand why your prescribing physician isn't able to diagnose you him/herself with anxiety. Anxiety is NOT uncommon. There are no "tests" he/she can do to prove you have it, as chances are, you aren't exhibiting the signs/symptoms at the moment of your appointments. Jeez Louise. Find another physician!
+1. Regular doctors certainly can diagnose anxiety, depression, etc.
 

House Cat

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
4,005
diamondseeker2006|1473892107|4076606 said:
House Cat|1473711239|4075612 said:
Did your doc tell you that the reason he won't prescribe antidepressants to you any longer is because it is very dangerous for someone with bipolar disorder to take antidepressants? The old school of thought was that people with bipolar disorder shouldn't take antidepressants without a mood stabilizer. More progressive psychiatrists are even getting away from that philosophy. Antidepressants cause mood swings and mania. The goal for people with bipolar disorder is to stabilize the mood, not to bring up what is down or to bring down what is up. Inducing mood swings is dangerous business because mood swings kindle. This means that the more mood swings you have, the more you will have and they gain intensity.

I have been doing this bipolar thing for more than twenty years. It is in your best interest to get properly diagnosed. I really hate hearing general practitioners treating ANY mental illness. They aren't qualified or specialized enough to do so. I have seen far too many nightmare medication foul ups on perfectly beautiful people at the hands of a GP who isn't ethical enough to admit that they aren't qualified enough to handle a person's case.


Sleep is the best brain cleanser and refresher that we have. You can get too much sleep, so the goal is to get 8 hours. If your sleep is crazy and anxious and full of thinking, you might need to do some investigating to see if you can do some things to make your sleep quality better. Can you make the room dark? No eating triggering foods before bed or watching triggering tv. No addressing triggering topics before bed, etc. If you have done all of that and you still can't sleep well, I would then try teas for sleep or ask the doc for something for sleep.

If I have a bad night's sleep, I will have an anxious day. If I have several bad nights, I will begin to get manic. Some people become depressed when they have many nights of poor sleep.

You have received many good suggestions here for meditation, exercise, etc.

I do something called EFT. This is where you tap on acupressure points while talking about what is bothering you. It really calms you! It might seem woo woo, but maybe give it a try! Here is a video for how to do it for anxiety.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWu3rSEddZI

I really hope you find something that works for you. <3
Oh goodness, this is new information to me (family member). Do you have links that support this? I need to read about this. I will tell you that my family member takes a mood stabilizer and the doctor says it will be a problem not to take an antidepressant with it. And in fact, the person has tried MANY times to slowly (over months) wean off antidepressants and ends up extremely depressed. I hate these meds because you become dependent on them and can't really get off, yet they aren't effective long term anyway!!!! JUst FYI, the person has been to psychiatrists, but in actuality, we get much more personal care from the GP. The psychiatrists we have tried were not much more than prescription writers and couldn't get you in for weeks if you needed to go right away.

To the OP...as others have said, if you have taken these meds for any length of time, it is very dangerous to go off of them cold turkey.
I will reply on the mental illness thread...
 

azstonie

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jul 1, 2014
Messages
3,758
Book by Jim Phelps, MD. Amazon. Best book and information which is up-to-date (as opposed to most MDs including psychiatrists whose information was what they learned in med school) regarding medication, treatment, how to live your life on a daily basis.
 

distracts

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Oct 11, 2011
Messages
5,495
I went through a phase this year where I was having panic attacks all the time. I started going to therapy again but did not change my medication (lexapro). My therapist recommended this book to read through in conjunction with therapy and I have found it very helpful: https://www.amazon.com/Anxiety-Phobia-Workbook-Edmund-Bourne/dp/1626252157/

Aside from ensuring I get enough sleep and reducing/eliminating caffeine, the thing I've been finding most helpful is setting aside 20 minutes a day for meditation. Because I'm lazy, I do it right before I go to sleep, lying down in bed. I like to clear my head and then mentally repeat a mantra that has to do with my current situation or is something I would tell myself if I'm about to have a panic attack. That way if the symptoms of one are building up, I can take a deep breath, repeat my thing, and my body is kind of used to being calm when I'm thinking that so it calms down. My psychologist also recommends meditating for 2 minutes every time you go to the bathroom so you get used to doing it multiple times throughout the day, and even though that advice sounds weird it works.

The book also has sections on all sorts of things - I found the diet and supplement sections to be useful. With my psychologist I was already working on cutting down caffeine because of the caffeine, but the book said that aspartame (which is in diet coke, which I drink) is also correlated with anxiety/panic attacks and has been found over time to damage the nervous system. I also take magnesium supplements. I've been trying to eat much healthier and mainly nonstarchy vegetables... that one is hard... I definitely feel better when I do but it's a work in progress. I am a potato chips and ice cream kind of girl.

It's interesting that Tyty said exercise helps her in the moment... for me, if I feel an increase in anxiety, exercising will push it into a full-blown panic attack and a bad one, where my face and hands will tingle and/or go numb and my whole body will shake and I'll be convinced I'm dying (multiple times I've been on the verge of calling 911 but called my husband instead and he drove home from work to talk me through it) and then I'll be drained for days. Exercise helps overall but I start with something low-impact/low-cardio like walking or yoga, and then progress to things like biking and pilates over time, just for a few minutes until my body starts freaking out, then I stop, then when I've calmed down I do a few more minutes, then stop, and just take it really slowly at first.

I haven't had a full-blown panic attack in three weeks now. Super happy about it. I've had a few instances of rising panic but I was able to calm down instead of spiraling into a worse and worse condition.
 

tyty333

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Dec 17, 2008
Messages
21,672
It's interesting that Tyty said exercise helps her in the moment... for me, if I feel an increase in anxiety, exercising will push it into a full-blown panic attack and a bad one, where my face and hands will tingle and/or go numb and my whole body will shake and I'll be convinced I'm dying (multiple times I've been on the verge of calling 911 but called my husband instead and he drove home from work to talk me through it) and then I'll be drained for days. Exercise helps overall but I start with something low-impact/low-cardio like walking or yoga, and then progress to things like biking and pilates over time, just for a few minutes until my body starts freaking out, then I stop, then when I've calmed down I do a few more minutes, then stop, and just take it really slowly at first.
That's so interesting distracts. The exercise in the moment seems to work for me because my heart has started to race (for no reason)
and when I start exercising it gives it a reason to be beating faster so subconsciously I am telling myself that there is nothing wrong
because your heart is suppose to beat faster when you're exercising. Also, the exercising gives me something to distract my thinking
and also uses up that extra adrenaline/cortisol I feel in my body.

I guess everyone has to find what works best for them. I know someone mentioned being held by their BF. When I feel like I want
to jump out of my skin that would just drive me nuts!
 

ruby59

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Feb 5, 2004
Messages
3,553
+1. Regular doctors certainly can diagnose anxiety, depression, etc.
__________________________

My primary care provider diagnosed mine. And his office staff cut through all the waiting times, to find someone to help me.

And that is what the OP's doctor should be doing.
 

random_thought

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jul 5, 2010
Messages
1,065
Asscherhalo_lover|1473897903|4076653 said:
Do you live in a state with legal marijuana? If you do you're in luck!
I do and I use it sparingly for my chronic pain disease, but I find that if I use it too often, it exasperates my bi-polar behavior, usually when I'm coming down from it, I end up lashing out at my poor husband :doh: so I try to avoid it if I can.
 
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