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Diamond District and Uncertified diamonds

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avrvsv

Rough_Rock
Joined
Apr 26, 2003
Messages
5
I have a question- I have the opportunity to buy a E, 1.49, SI2 (no inclusions to naked eye), 60%/60% table/depth, no florescence, ex/vg for polish and symmetry for $6,200. The dealer said the following:

1- New stone, has not been certified yet. But, willing to take stone to any appraiser we choose to get appraised.
2- He will get it certified if we are interested.
3- The girdle needs polishing? - What does this mean.

My questions are- would you buy a diamond like this, and is it a common practice among trusted dealers to allow you to appraise independently to a appraiser of your choice. Does it show trust worthiness? Can the appraiser pick up on an clarity enhancements? or other flaws in diamond. How closely do appraisers generally match GIA certification results? Lastly, is this a good price for this diamond? Can anyone recommend a good appraiser in NYC?
 

niceice

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jan 29, 2003
Messages
1,792
Be sure to obtain a complete Sarin / OGI computerized proportions analysis because a 60/60 combination can result in a range of proportions anywhere between AGS-2 Very Good (if you're lucky) down to AGS-10 Very Poor depending on the crown and pavilion angle measurements... The option of having the diamond evaluated by an independent GIA Graduate Gemologist or the equivelent thereof is a good idea, but having the diamond graded by either the GIA or AGS laboratory would be better because there are a lot of gem treatments out there that the labs are equipped to catch while many gemologists lack the equipment to do so... You're in New York, so why not have the diamond graded by the GIA? Their turn around time isn't that bad right now... If not, you might call on David Wolf for an appraisal... An unpolished girdle, also known as a "bruted girdle", simply means that it is rough in appearance... The finish on a girdle edge is more of a finishing thing kind of like adding chrome to a car, but we prefer polished or faceted girdles... A really rough girdle can be prone to catching dirt, the key word being "can" and not will...
 

barry

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Mar 21, 2001
Messages
441
Good advice by RT. You're in NY.
Go to GIA.
Turnaround time for walk-in full-certification right now
is 10-14 business days. They are equipped to detect
all kinds of treatments such as HPHT, clarity enhancement,
etc. For this kind of money, stay safe and go with the best.
Also get a Sarin/MegaScope Proportion-Cut analysis of the
diamond and give us the specs; we'll run a light performance analysis for you.

If the diamond is still attractive to you after this,
David Wolf for an appraisal is thorough and excellent.

Barry
www.superbcert.com
 

Giangi

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 23, 2003
Messages
2,530
R&T and Barry;

I agree with you 100%. Maybe the girdle is natural, unfaceted and bearded and that's why it needs to be polished or faceted.

BTW, your seller sounds a good one... Not too pushy as some I've seen in 47th street!
 
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