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Diamond Color F vs. G

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DiamondSeeker7

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Feb 16, 2007
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After reading several threads, I noticed that most people would recommend purhasing a G color or a D, E, or F. Is it true that once mounted you won''t be able to see any color in a G diamond? Thanks
 

tanalasta

Shiny_Rock
Premium
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Dec 28, 2006
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A diamond colour is graded with the table down. A well cut G-diamond facing up will reflect a lot of white light and look colourless once mounted. You will still see the colour if you are colour sensitive and look side-on a white background but for practical purposes, it will look like a colourless diamond from the top.

Some people can tell the difference if they were comparing it side-to-side with a 'D/E'.

Most people, looking at it without a comparison would not be able to tell.
 

belle

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Nov 19, 2004
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10,285
it depends on the cut, the lab that graded the diamond, the size of the diamond and your perception of color, among other things. to say that you will not be able to see any color in a ''g'' diamond is an overgeneralization. i do think that ''g'' is a good, safe choice but to definitively say you will not see any color considering there are many other factors involved would not be correct.
 

the other Jake

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Nov 9, 2006
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It is usually difficult for people to detect color differences within 1-2 grades. Face up, in a mounted, well cut stone- highly unlikely. Most people see H/I color stones as colorless... so a G is considered safe except for extremely color sensitive people. Even then it would only be only slightly detectable from the side when viewed in certain situations and compared to a higher color stone (not realistic). The larger the stone, the easier to detect color, but with a 1.5 ct stone you will be safe. I personally purchased around a 1.15 ct I color ACA and have spent the past several days trying to detect color. I can only see it in certain lights and even then its a warmth (not yellow) that is barely detectable and only from the side... If you really want to be able to know your/ your friends sensitivity you should go to a jeweler and compare several different AGS 0 stones. A D compared to an I is noticable, but I could not justify it for the price difference or the loss of size. The only thing people will say if you buy that A Cut Above stone, is how sparkly it is.

ETA: I also compared an I color HOF (which is similar to the ACA) to a well cut F stone face up (both unmounted) and the I color definately held its own color wise, overall performance- it blew the F color away... color isn't everything
 

Unearthed

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Feb 14, 2007
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103
I don't really think it's fair to answer this question without suggesting you go for a little trip to the local jewelery stores and taking a look see in person. Here's an H though:

 

jaz464

Ideal_Rock
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Jul 11, 2005
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2,022
Yeah, really, really depends. Are we talking about rounds here? If we are comparing 3 carat diamonds than yes you may likely see a difference. Smaller diamonds, it will depend on many factors.
 

niceice

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jan 29, 2003
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1,792
Date: 2/26/2007 8:55:14 AM
Author:DiamondSeeker7
After reading several threads, I noticed that most people would recommend purhasing a G color or a D, E, or F. Is it true that once mounted you won''t be able to see any color in a G diamond? Thanks
Is it possible to see ANY color in a G color diamond once it is mounted? Quite simply, yes.

Colorless: DEF
Near Colorless: GHIJ

Spend enough time looking at diamonds and the subtle differences in color will begin to become apparent with little effort. Over time, it would be possible for the average person to distinguish between a D and an E color diamond with a little bit of coaching and the right lighting environment.

The real question is how color sensitive are you and the intended recipient of the diamond? Some people need their diamond to be a crisp, clean white (DEF) and other people don''t mind a hint of tonal value as found in G/H color diamonds and by "hint" I do mean a hint of color, nothing dramatic. If the diamond is precisely cut, I''d venture to say that most people would be distracted enough by the fire and brilliance of the diamond to be able to distinguish between a color grade or two which is why G/H/I makes such a wonderful option for most people!

I would definitely recommend visiting a local jewelry store to view a few diamonds of comparable cut and different color grades... Keep in mind that you will be viewing the diamonds under store lighting which is designed to make diamonds look whiter - blue diochromatic filters are often used to mask the true body color of diamonds in most store environments.
 

Beacon

Ideal_Rock
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Jul 14, 2006
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2,037
In well cut round you should be fine with G-D. I have one of each (that sounds terrible
) and there is little clear difference.

In the G stone I never saw much color while it was loose. However, it suffered after being set quite badly in a pendant. In some lights I could see color. The prongs are white gold and when they set it the prongs gave a yellowish tinge which got reflected in the stone. As we speak it is in the diamond hospital being refurbished with new prongs and I am sure it will look much better once it is done.

I could see slight color difference between the F and D rounds but it is just so small. They need to be right next to each other to tell.
 

kcoursolle

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 21, 2006
Messages
10,589
The difference is very very slight and not everyone can see it, but some can. Even if you can see it, what is important is whether the slight difference will bother you or not. To me, I''m not even bothered by an I or a J.
 

FireGoddess

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 25, 2005
Messages
12,145
Date: 2/26/2007 1:58:10 PM
Author: Beacon
In well cut round you should be fine with G-D. I have one of each (that sounds terrible
) and there is little clear difference.
No dear, that sounds like something to aspire to.
 

diamondseeker2006

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
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Jan 11, 2006
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55,610
The problem with going to a jewelry store to look at color is that the diamonds on average won''t be anywhere near as well as the ideal cut stones people buy on here. The better the cut, the whiter the diamond will face up, probably. So G is no problem for me in ideal cut (or H either).
 

Ellen

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Jan 13, 2006
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24,426
Date: 2/26/2007 6:30:56 PM
Author: diamondseeker2006
The problem with going to a jewelry store to look at color is that the diamonds on average won''t be anywhere near as well as the ideal cut stones people buy on here. The better the cut, the whiter the diamond will face up, probably. So G is no problem for me in ideal cut (or H either).
That''s why when I suggest looking in B&M''s, to get a truer picture, I tell people to look at HOF or other branded diamonds, which should be close to or on par with the stones we see around here.
 

LuciferSam

Rough_Rock
Joined
Feb 20, 2007
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16
I held the G color round brilliant stone I just bought, next to a large, D color stone - and no matter how hard I looked, I couldn't tell the difference at all.

I could however see the difference in an H ever so slightly - and for some reason once it got to I color - I thought it was absolutely apparent - but only when upside down against a white piece of paper.

I am the average person , and I can't tell the difference between D-G even when side by side.

And as the average person, do I think it's worth spending the extra money to get a D color stone? Not a chance.... but that's just me.
 
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