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clarity

Color vs. Clarity - Which one can you compromise?

Discussion in 'RockyTalky' started by tazgirl, Apr 20, 2002.

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  1. tazgirl
    Rough_Rock

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    by tazgirl » Apr 20, 2002
    I've heard color is more important than clarity (ie, E color with VS2).

    Then I've heard clarity is more important than color (ie, G color with VVS1).

    Is this all a matter of opinion or is one of these statements really true?

    Help.....I'm trying to buy a princess cut diamond and need advice badly.

    Thanks!:wavey:
     
    


    


  2. Garry H (Cut Nut)
    Super_Ideal_Rock
    Trade

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    by Garry H (Cut Nut) » Apr 20, 2002
    It is also a matter of religion.
    Many people believe that clarity = purity = divine powers. I believe in market forces.
    You can see the differnece between I and D, you would not be likely to see the difference between IF and SI1 (especially in a princess cut).
    I can not see my wifes SI1 inclusion.

    So F SI1 looks as good to me 99% of the time as D IF (but I am a snob so her diamond is D).

    What has changed and will continue to occur is the diamond market is becoming 'democratised'. 50 years ago only a very few very rich people could afford diamonds of any size, and those people tended to buy on the recomendation of their trusted jeweller (and the jeweller stocked on the sdvice of his trusted supplier too).
    Todays customer wants a certificate even from Tiffany or Cartier and the store wants a cert from his supplier.
    But what has really begun to change the value of Clarity is:
    1. Consumers look at 2 diamonds - D IF and G SI and say "You want 3 times as much money for this 1ct D IF - ya gotta be kidd'n me man!!!" Market forces equal supply and demand.
    2. News Corp and other global media companies are globalising the world and church going and superstition is waning. As the superstitious link between purity and diamond buying erodes.

    Young couples the world over buying engagement rings just want the biggest brightest whitest clean looking rock to show their commitment to one another to their worlld; their family and freinds.
     
  3. tazgirl
    Rough_Rock

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    by tazgirl » Apr 20, 2002
    Hmm....So it seems that color is more visible to the naked eye than clarity with a princess cut diamond. Well....that certainly puts things into focus (no pun intended). I will keep that in mind as I continue to shop.

    Thanks a million for the advice and insight!
     
  4. barry
    Shiny_Rock

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    by barry » Apr 21, 2002
    Taz;

    I think you should really focus on "Cut".

    A beautifully cut diamond will "mask"
    imperfections and tend to "face-up" your
    stone at least 1 color-grade higher than what is
    listed on your certificate.

    Thus, a superior-cut princess graded I/ SI-1
    by GIA can probably "face-up" to you as a
    G-H/VS- VVS stone.

    Keep this in mind when shopping, and educate
    yourself on what is today considered
    an Ideal-Cut Princess.

    Good Luck.

    Barry
    www.superbcert.com
    "When Good Isn't Good Enough"
     
    


    


  5. oldminer
    Ideal_Rock
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    by oldminer » Apr 21, 2002
    You have two wonderful answers already. Can't be any better advice.

    Buy according to your own taste and background. The color of diamonds is very finely divided, clarity is more roughly divided. You can reduce the color several grades, the clarity some as well before any difference from D-IF is noticeable even to expert eyes.

    Cut, as you have been told, is the one area where a little difference begins to make an impact. Many diamond dealers like slightly off-make cuts as the economics are better, but informed consumers take a long look and generally select very finely crafted stones with near the maximum brilliancy.

    Get and Ideal-Scope to examine actual diamonds or use the HCA to judge diamonds that you don't physically have in front of you in order to assess brilliancy.
     
  6. tazgirl
    Rough_Rock

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    by tazgirl » Apr 21, 2002
    I appreciate everyone's advice. I was looking into getting the Ideal-Scope as I'm just a "diamond-beginner". I will probably purchase it now since it seems that cut is first and foremost. Thanks again! :loopy:
     
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