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Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and OJ and

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Would you allow/do you allow your children to play in contact sports?

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronic_traumatic_encephalopathy

I have no doubt that trauma to a developing brain is very dangerous and given recent knowledge (I did not see the Concussion movie yet but have read the studies) do you/would you allow your children to play football and other contact sports? I don't have children but I honestly don't think I would allow my children to participate in these sports but am interested in hearing all opinions and the reasoning behind them.



http://nypost.com/2016/01/28/concussion-doc-with-bombshell-bet-oj-simpson-has-cte/

O.J. Simpson’s best defense may be coming 22 years after the death of Nicole Brown Simpson.

The neuropathologist who discovered the brain disease that is rocking the NFL believes Simpson suffers from it.



Bennet Omalu, the forensic pathologist who first identified chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), said he is beyond confident Simpson suffers from the disease that is caused by repeated brain trauma.

“I would bet my medical license that he has CTE,” Omalu, who was played by Will Smith in “Concussion,” told People magazine.

CTE has wide-ranging symptoms, including impaired judgment, aggression, depression and dementia. It has been diagnosed in nearly 100 former NFL players, many of whom displayed violent and unpredictable temperaments as the condition — which only can be diagnosed postmortem — worsened toward the end of their life. Ex-Bear Dave Duerson, who killed himself in 2011, had it; ex-Charger Junior Seau, who killed himself in 2012, had it; then-Chief Jovan Belcher, who killed himself and his girlfriend in 2012, had it.


“Given his profile,” Omalu said about Simpson, “I think it’s not an irresponsible conclusion to suspect he has CTE.”

Simpson, a former running back great with the Bills and 49ers, was acquitted of all criminal charges of the 1994 murder of his ex-wife and Ronald Goldman, a waiter, in a case that is still heatedly debated today.

Since the trial, Simpson’s life has been marked by legal and financial troubles, culminating in a 2007 armed robbery in Nevada, for which Simpson and a friend were found guilty for stealing sports memorabilia at gunpoint.

Simpson is currently serving a nine-to-33-year sentence in prison for the crime, for which he considered using a brain-disease defense.

In 2012 — two years after he was convicted — he and his lawyer had outlined an argument that the hits to the head that are so ingrained in football caused his actions.

“I was knocked out of games for such head blows repeatedly in the 1970s and other times I continued playing despite hard blows to my head during the football games,” Simpson said, according to ESPN.

In the end, Simpson did not use that tack, instead arguing his lawyer had botched the case.
 

Jambalaya

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When you look into all the dangers such as this one, you automatically think "You know, I think I would steer my kid away from those sports, just to be on the safe side - after all, there are other forms of exercise" etc.

But then, on the other hand, the truth is that the vast majority of kids play these sports with no ill effects. So another part of me would be tempted to let the fictional kid live life in all its glory and let the cards fall where they may, once adequate safety training and equipment had been issued.

I know someone will probably come along and say "Oh, well, life is full of risks - you are at risk every time you cross the road" etc etc, but I don't think the fact that life is full of risks means we shouldn't examine a clear risk such as this one. I mean, they are called "contact" sports - you are bashing up against others and therefore more likely to get hurt than playing a non-contact sport. So I think it's definitely a question worth addressing.

If I had a child who absolutely loved a contact sport and was desperate to play it, I probably wouldn't hold her or him back, but I would do my best to instill safety and I'd buy the highest-quality helmet available. If the child wasn't so bothered about contact sports, I would definitely steer him or her toward "safer" sports.

You know, there is the same safety issue with kids and horse-riding. That is one of the most dangerous sports around - and also cheerleading, another sports with a very high rate of serious injury compared to other sports.

Maybe I'll just encourage Fictional Kid to stick with playing the violin! :think:
 

House Cat

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My son suffered a severe concussion from a fall where his head hit a fixed chair and then a cement floor. He definitely had post concussion syndrome for a year following the event. His academic abilities declined. To be honest, I am not convinced they fully returned.

He wants to play football so badly. He has asked more times than I can count. It is not going to happen. It is not worth the risk.
 

purplesparklies

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My oldest son is 14 and wants to play football but I will not allow it at this age. I did let him play in 2nd grade and he hated it. His current 8th grade class has a few boys who have already had concussions. One kid has had 8! And continues to play football. I do not understand it. My son, while athletically capable, is not destined for greatness as an athlete. The potential detriment far outweighs the potential benefit, in my opinion. It's a no for us. He has played soccer and there is risk there also but has not had any forceful bodily contact on the field, yet. He currently participates in Tae Kwon Do but only no contact sparring and he is interested in learning to play tennis and golf. That works for me.
 

Tacori E-ring

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No. I would never let me child to play a contact sport that could result in a TBI. I work in mental health and see the life long results of such injuries. No game is worth that IMHO.
 

kenny

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When it comes to contact sports, I'd be as concerned about the psychological effects as the potential for physical harm to my child.

Chest thumping, Rah Rah Rah!, and pride in beating others?
No thanks, not something I'd encourage in my kid, boy or girl.
Testosterone may help a couple people climb their way to the top to become a big shot CEO or senator, but IMO the aggressive anti-social downsides of testosterone are a scourge on society.

In my child I would not encourage competing, winning, conquering, and beating others.
I'd encourage the opposite ... getting along with others, kindness, helping, cooperating and being a contributing member of society.

If someone feels that makes me and my kids wimps or wusses, so be it.
 

minousbijoux

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Surprisingly, its not just American football, but European football (soccer) as well. My kids grew up being avid players. I watched countless times when kids, going for a header, would knock heads with resulting injuries. For that matter, they are now saying that just the very fact of heading the ball repeatedly, over the course of seasons of play, can cause head injury.
 

monarch64

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Nope, no contact sports for kids if I had any who wanted to play them. My job is to protect my child and keep him alive and healthy, so why the hell would I encourage him to go have his brain shaken around in his skull for funsies? :confused:

I have had a concussion. I lost an entire week as in, don't remember any of it, when I was a kid. I was wearing those boat shoes (Sperry's or similar) with square, leather laces that always came untied. I was at a festival with friends and we were all running towards a ride to get on it before it started up again and I tripped and fell flat on my face. Like, my cheekbone literally bore the entire brunt of my fall. My parents were told by the doctors who treated me that any repeated falls or head injuries were to be avoided, period, so I cannot imagine one willingly participating in a sport in which one's brain is concussed on a regular basis.
 

AdaBeta27

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minousbijoux|1454178115|3984185 said:
Surprisingly, its not just American football, but European football (soccer) as well. My kids grew up being avid players. I watched countless times when kids, going for a header, would knock heads with resulting injuries. For that matter, they are now saying that just the very fact of heading the ball repeatedly, over the course of seasons of play, can cause head injury.
I have long thought that soccer players, and especially children, ought to be wearing helmets. I used to play women's soccer in a local fun league when I was in my 20s. I agree that it's a contact sport. I never got a head injury but that was just luck.
 

Yimmers

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My former coworker was a football player for U of O. He concussed so badly in college once that he was unable to speak for weeks and had to undergo speech therapy to learn to talk again. He also experienced nerve damage which caused him to sweat badly on his face. That's a permanent condition, although his doctor has since prescribed a topical medication which has stopped the excess sweat.

He has said that if he has kids, he won't let them play football. That's enough for me.
 

lulu

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Oldest grandson has had two lacrosse related concussions. I was so happy when he switched to football because he was too small and never got in the game.
 

asscherisme

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Nope, I would not and did not. My oldest is 19 so past that stage. My 17 year old is in marching band so I spend many of my Friday nights in fall at the high school football games supporting her and volunteering and it shocks me how violent even high school football is. Some of those teens get really hurt. Their bodies are big and strong but their brains are still developing and its a dangerous combo.
 

missy

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I'm sorry some of you have experienced concussions and glad you are doing well and have recovered!

After reading some of your experiences I stand by my thought of not allowing any of my (fictional) children to participate in any violent contact sport where getting hit in the head is a real possibility. Not worth it on any level.

Our children's brains are their most precious asset and why would any of us take a chance with their mental/intellectual/emotional development for the "opportunity" to play contact sports? Risk benefit ratio is not there IMO under any circumstances.
 

Maria D

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As a high school teacher, I regularly see the effects of concussions on adolescents. Initially the student is placed on what we call "academic rest;" it's literally resting your brain. This means no homework, assessments, reading or video games until their doctor clears them. The less work the brain has to do, the faster it will heal.

What I find ridiculous is that our protocol has the student still coming to class but they are told not to think. Huh? It's school, that's what you do in class. The student is supposed to hang out and, if they get a headache, go visit the nurse. I keep play-doh in my room and have the student play with it in the back of the class. For some, even THAT is too much, they just want to lay down and nap. It is incredibly stressful for the student. By being in the class, they see how much they are missing. Many do not follow doctor's orders - they try to partially keep up which means they are just going to take longer to heal.

Typically after about two weeks, they are cleared for academic work and playing sports. But, I've seen kids take several months to get back to normal. They will make little mistakes, forget things they have learned (as in forget they ever learned it to begin with), and not be able to concentrate for more than 20 minutes at a time. That's for first concussions. I've had students with multiple concussions that are affected the entire school year and beyond. It's really sad and stressful for the student.

I'm heartened to read the responses here - I think you're all doing the right thing.
 
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