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Are You Very Safety-Conscious?

Jambalaya

Ideal_Rock
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Oct 2, 2014
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3,594
I am very safety-conscious indeed, and my former partner used to laugh at me for it. I remember in college days a room-mate being surprised that i took fire risk seriously, too. (The house fire alarm had gone off and I reacted instantly.)

Just had a six-alarm fire incident here. Someone left their food on the stove - I think the person has dementia. They have done it before, but this time it was worse - much more smoke and smell.

I learned something about myself tonight. I always thought I'd grab some jewelry, at least my Mothers ring. But I looked out, saw all the trucks and the fully extended cherry picker, and I just completely fled. All I took were my house keys to lock up - I didn't even take my purse. Just the nightclothes I stood up in, and my keys. All other household members are away right now, so it was just me.

Two things I've always had the greatest of respect for are fire and the sea. I try never to go more than waist-deep in the rare occasions I go in the sea, since the waters are unknown to me. I always take a fire alarm seriously, whether it seems to be real or not, with the idea that you just never know. I always put my seat belt on in the car, even when stationary because someone could plough into me from behind.

I am very safety-conscious and have been like that since young - and the two things I take really seriously are fire and the sea. Is anyone else the same, or do you not really think about safety? I just know that the sea is intensely powerful, and that fire can spread in the blink of an eye. I once read about a fire that spread inside the walls.

So I was the only one tonight in my nightclothes, and one of the first out. (11.30pm.) Everyone else had changed. i felt silly but one resident said "In a different scenario we're all dead and she's the only one alive!"

Anyway. Night of drama. Just reminded me of how much I respect the power of fire and water. Do others feel the same?
 

sonnyjane

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Jul 13, 2008
Messages
2,476
I think there is a difference between being "safety conscious" and being afraid.

I wear a seatbelt. I observe my surroundings when in public. I kayak alone and take proper safety precautions (proper attire, gps and phone, spare paddle, etc.). That to me is being safety conscious.

What you describe, especially about rarely going into the ocean but never going above your waist when you do, for me at least, borders more on fear. The ocean should be respected, but if you never venture beyond your waist you miss quite a bit out there :)

I can't fault you for a quick fire response though.
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Jun 8, 2008
Messages
34,861
I agree with sonnyjane about there being a difference b/w being safety conscious and afraid.

I am very safety conscious and risk adverse. However I still managed to break my leg in 2 places in June 2014. Yet I still got back on my bicycle after I healed though that was how I broke my leg. Why you might think. Is she crazy LOL. Well, that is a separate question haha. :cheeky:

The reason I could not wait to get back on the bike is because I am not going to be afraid of living and enjoying my life. I took the proper steps to ensure it hopefully doesn't happen again by discontinuing the pedals and cycling shoes I was wearing that made the accident so severe so if I should fall again (and chances are I will since we cycle such long distances so often) the fall won't result in such a severe result.

So yes like Sonnyjane I am aware of my surroundings and I take the proper precautions at all times. I wear my helmet always when cycling and now don't wear the cycling shoes that clip into the pedals. I wear my seatbelt when driving/riding in the car. I go into the ocean when the lifeguard is there. I wear a life preserver when boating. I wear sunblock when out all day and sun protective clothing due to my sun allergy. That's right I have a sun allergy but it doesn't stop me. And etc etc etc.

I respect the dangers that exist all around us but I enjoy my life taking the necessary steps to be safe but still partaking in activities I enjoy. If I let fear rule life would not be fun at all. You could get hit by crossing the street so I always remember to look both ways and then GO. That's what I do with everything in life. Look around, be smart, be safe and then GO and enjoy!
 

jordyonbass

Brilliant_Rock
Trade
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Dec 6, 2014
Messages
1,823
Oh yeah - there is nobody here that has as much respect as I do for the ocean for it's come close to taking my life a few times. I've been out in storms where we thought the boat would definitely sink at some point but managed to make it back thanks to experience and instincts, I've come face-to-face with some of the meanest and most dangerous marine predators around as well. Safety is my first consideration whenever I organize a trip; first I will check weather forecasts to ensure I'm not putting my crew and I in danger. From there we check our vessels for possible signs of wear or damage and that we are carrying all the correct safety gear,6407208479 that is in date as well as operational. Finally a safety briefing with any new crew as to what our emergency procedures are in case of bad storm, capsizing, man-overboard, or other potential emergency that can arise (and there has been a few).

When I was younger I got offered to fish with someone for Marlin if I brought all my fishing gear; had I known that the only safety gear he had was non-compliant life jackets then I wouldn't have gone out on his boat. No GPS/chartplotter mapping, no compass, no flares, no emergency beacon - NOTHING.
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Jun 8, 2008
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34,861
Ha I meant I wear a life jacket not life preserver. :doh:
 

Jambalaya

Ideal_Rock
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Oct 2, 2014
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I was just thinking about this topic because of the six-alarm incident here last night. I really surprised myself. I always thought I'd at least take my mother's ring and my purse, but when I saw six trucks, smelled smoke, and saw the cherry picker extended full, I just fled. So embarrassing to be out there in my nightwear!

Just to clarify, I don't live anywhere near the sea, so it's very rare for me to be near the ocean. It's not as if I'm perched next to it every day staring at it longingly but not daring to go in. :lol:

I don't see it as fear, I see it as being sensible. The few times I find myself at an ocean, I don't know those waters. I have no idea what the currents are - or where they are. I'm not very strong or fit so feel I could get swept out easily. You can swim easily in waist-deep water. I do like bathing in saltwater, though I rarely get to do it. Someone mentioned swimming in the sea only when there is a lifeguard. Sounds like a plan.

Jordy, you sound very sensible indeed about all the safety precautions! Well done you!

I have this friend who sees no danger, anywhere. He literally wanders around Miami in the the early hours, burns lots of candles with the window open and pieces of paper blowing around near the lit candles, and microwaves damp clothes to dry them, as well as stores pots and pans in the oven.

ETA: Sonnyjane, you sound very brave, kayaking alone! I'm sure you must have great experiences. It sounds very relaxing. This is a good example, though, of something I probably wouldn't do. For example, if your kayak tips over, your phone and GPS will be useless, no? Kayaks seem to tip over a lot. Or perhaps I'm thinking of canoes. (You can tell how experienced I am at the great outdoors!) You don't kayak where there are crocs, do you?
 

momhappy

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Messages
4,660
Jambalaya|1452664828|3975273 said:
I am very safety-conscious indeed, and my former partner used to laugh at me for it. I remember in college days a room-mate being surprised that i took fire risk seriously, too. (The house fire alarm had gone off and I reacted instantly.)

Just had a six-alarm fire incident here. Someone left their food on the stove - I think the person has dementia. They have done it before, but this time it was worse - much more smoke and smell.

I learned something about myself tonight. I always thought I'd grab some jewelry, at least my Mothers ring. But I looked out, saw all the trucks and the fully extended cherry picker, and I just completely fled. All I took were my house keys to lock up - I didn't even take my purse. Just the nightclothes I stood up in, and my keys. All other household members are away right now, so it was just me.

Two things I've always had the greatest of respect for are fire and the sea. I try never to go more than waist-deep in the rare occasions I go in the sea, since the waters are unknown to me. I always take a fire alarm seriously, whether it seems to be real or not, with the idea that you just never know. I always put my seat belt on in the car, even when stationary because someone could plough into me from behind.

I am very safety-conscious and have been like that since young - and the two things I take really seriously are fire and the sea. Is anyone else the same, or do you not really think about safety? I just know that the sea is intensely powerful, and that fire can spread in the blink of an eye. I once read about a fire that spread inside the walls.

So I was the only one tonight in my nightclothes, and one of the first out. (11.30pm.) Everyone else had changed. i felt silly but one resident said "In a different scenario we're all dead and she's the only one alive!"

Anyway. Night of drama. Just reminded me of how much I respect the power of fire and water. Do others feel the same?
I'm sort of shocked that you were the only one in pajamas :shock: I had an experience fairly recently where the city sounded an alarm (sort of like a tornado siren) and a loud voice urged everyone to stay inside due to the threat of a dangerous person in the area. I was out running errands and immediately got in my car to return home, but I was shocked to see that most people completely ignored the alarm ad went about their daily business. I think people tend to think that most emergency situations are not real and therefore, they don't want to overreact. I consider myself to be overly safety-conscious, but I think that stems from the fact that I have kids and I want nothing more than to keep us safe.
 

ame

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jul 7, 2004
Messages
10,742
Psychotic. Thefts and stalking incidents have changed me for the worse, unfortunately.
 

dk168

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jul 7, 2013
Messages
5,940
I do not put myself in risky situations knowingly, and would like to believe I am safety-savvy, having to fend for myself from mid teens in a foreign country when I was sent to UK to study.

DK :))
 

sonnyjane

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jul 13, 2008
Messages
2,476
Jambalaya|1452705851|3975466 said:
ETA: Sonnyjane, you sound very brave, kayaking alone! I'm sure you must have great experiences. It sounds very relaxing. This is a good example, though, of something I probably wouldn't do. For example, if your kayak tips over, your phone and GPS will be useless, no? Kayaks seem to tip over a lot. Or perhaps I'm thinking of canoes. (You can tell how experienced I am at the great outdoors!) You don't kayak where there are crocs, do you?
Ha no crocs, but it is still dangerous. There are some places I absolutely won't go to alone, but others where I feel comfortable. It's a calculated risk. The water is cold (in the 40's) so I wear special dry suits. The phone/gps are in a waterproof bag specifically for water sports around my neck. I also took lessons initially and practice how to get back into my boat should I fall at least once a month. It's startling when you're alone and a seal surfaces just beside you or something like that, but it's also really fun.

The anecdote about your friend made me smile. I went to college in Miami. I would walk home alone from the bars at 3AM. That was more than a decade ago. I'm not sure I would still do that now but maybe I would. Luckily nothing happened to me during those 4 years of school. I kind of believe that bad things CAN happen to you anywhere. What people perceive as the most dangerous spots or activities often aren't statistically. For example, in 2015, more people died while trying to take a selfie than were killed by sharks, yet people are still scared of sharks and still taking selfies!
 

Jambalaya

Ideal_Rock
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Joined
Oct 2, 2014
Messages
3,594
Killed by taking selfies!! Sonnyjane, those stats are wild!

Momhappy - I know!! I was embarrassed but man, there were six trucks outside! Can't believe I didn't even grab my late mother's engagement ring. That is very worrying behavior for a PSer! :o
 

december-fire

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Sep 3, 2013
Messages
2,346
Jambalaya,

You reacted in a wise, logical and responsible manner. You have no reason to feel embarrassed!

I'm sure you know that your love for your late mother and cherished memories of her are not dependent upon having a piece of her jewellery.

Lives have been lost when people don't leave a burning building or return to retrieve possessions. :rolleyes:

Firefighters and other first responders don't need the additional burden and threat to their own safety because some foolish individuals decided to take the time to get dressed or wait and see if it really was necessary to leave the building.

I'm sorry your former partner laughed at you for being safety conscious.

From reading some of your posts, my sense is that you are a thoughtful, intelligent individual.

Might I suggest that others could learn from you.

Firefighters are on the scene, alarms are sounding, and some of the building occupants are changing their clothes or pondering whether to leave the building. Really? :nono:
You're wise enough to leave the building immediately. An action I'm sure the firefighters appreciate.

You know your swimming abilities and know that sea currents can be quite strong. You don't venture too far out into the water. Again, an action that would be appreciated by potential rescuers.

Some people have occupations or hobbies that might seem quite daring to you. But those people have probably had a great deal of training, practice, etc., to try to minimize risks.

We shouldn't let fear stop us from enjoying life.
But that's a different topic.

Hugs and I'm glad you're safe. :wavey:
 

Jambalaya

Ideal_Rock
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Joined
Oct 2, 2014
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3,594
December-fire, you are very sweet. Thank you. :love:
 

Jambalaya

Ideal_Rock
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Oct 2, 2014
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On a lighter note than safety and danger, may I just wantonly discuss those lovely firemen for a minute? I've never seen any up close before. Man, they were hot! Come to momma! WOOF!

OK, I just had to get that out of my system.
 

Sky56

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Feb 27, 2010
Messages
1,037
Yes. My safety and survival are number one priority ;-) Some advice...don't ignore things as the mind likes to play tricks. A few years ago, we escaped a building that was on fire. For two hours before hand, we smelled some very odd odors, we couldn't stop talking about it and feeling baffled about it, we even opened doors and looked around. Then, hours later, a man pounding hard on our door and all the others yelling " get out, fire!" Nobody was hurt, but still...there were signs of trouble, and we discounted them. I read later, that this is very common as humans tend to justify normalcy.
 
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