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Are you a spiritual person?

Gussie

Ideal_Rock
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Apr 20, 2017
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3,000
I consider myself spiritual in that I don't need answers for everything. I trust that there is a reason for it all, and there is something much much larger than me.

Spirituality has always helped me through tough times. I need it on a primal level.

I am also religious but not dogmatic. I have no need to convert or judge anyone. Religion for me coexists with my own spirituality but I definitely believe they can be mutually exclusive.
 

Karl_K

Super_Ideal_Rock
Trade
Joined
Aug 4, 2008
Messages
10,460
I’m genuinely curious. Is it possible to be a spiritual atheist?
Interesting question and based on some people I have known I would say yes.
I myself have felt a spiritual connection to places in the woods.
When I entered them my spirit felt at home and in peace.
It was not worship, I did not and dont worship those places but I did feel a strong connection and peace there.
I know others who have felt the same in different places including atheists. So yes in my opinion spiritual atheists exist.
 

kenny

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Joined
Apr 30, 2005
Messages
28,975
I can't answer yes or no.

Spiritual, spirits, the soul, superstitions, astronomy and zillions of religions that humans have invented over the ages is all merely feel-good stuff, for which there's no evidence.
Last time I checked Wiki said there are over 40,000 christian denominations ... of course all members are sure they follow the only correct way.
Okie Dokie Then! :doh:
We're supposed to just respect that? :rolleyes:

... so I won't play by answering the OP's question.
I strive to believe only what there is adequate evidence for.
I won't pretend (aka have faith) or do hopeful thinking.

It's important to me to believe as many true things as possible, and as few false things as possible.
I care about truth and honesty, and I'll take my lumps and be despised for it.

I realize I'm in a tiny minority of the human population.
No problem, I've had over 60 years to get used used to that.
 
Last edited:

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Jun 8, 2008
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40,717
I’m genuinely curious. Is it possible to be a spiritual atheist?
I know you weren't asking me but I want to share my thoughts. I think yes. 100% yes. I don't define spirituality as being religious or having any religious affiliation. As I wrote before one's definition may vary but mine keeps spirituality separate from religion and religious affiliation. It's being at peace with the world and this earth and being a part of the bigger picture.

Here is one definition I came across while googling just now.

Spirituality is about seeking a meaningful connection with something bigger than yourself, which can result in positive emotions, such as peace, awe, contentment, gratitude, and acceptance.

There are different definitions. However spirituality can be and often is separate from religion.

WHAT IS SPIRITUALITY? IS IT DIFFERENT FROM RELIGION? WHAT IF I DON’T GO TO CHURCH OR BELONG TO A FAITH COMMUNITY?
Every person has spirituality. Whatever moves or expresses your spirit or inner energy is part of your spirituality. In some senses your spirituality is expressed in every aspect of your personal and public life. It is just part of who you are – woven into and expressed through every thought, feeling, and action.
There are many definitions of spirituality. Any of them can be helpful in understanding this important yet mysterious part of life. Ultimately, none of them captures the whole reality, but what becomes clear is that spirituality has these core elements:
  • Finding or making some kind of meaning in your life:
    Everyone deals with issues such as identity, suffering and hope. What makes such issues spiritual is that they raise questions about the meaning of life, life in general and your life in particular. Your spirituality is shaped by the answers you give these questions. This aspect of spirituality is examined further in this article:
  • Learning to live in relationships:
    Consider your relationship with yourself, with others, with the natural world, with the human-shaped world, and with the transcendent dimension (referred to in religions by such names as God, Allah, Universal Truth, Creator, or Holy One, but by others as Higher Power, Life Force, Life Energy, Web of Life, or simply The Sacred).

The way we express our spirituality is shaped by our personal, family, and cultural experiences.
Some people express their spirituality in a religious way. This usually includes religious language, beliefs and symbols. People maintain their religion through individual practices and participation in the rituals of their faith community. Religious people often turn to their religious faith and community for comfort and strength in difficult times.
Spirituality can also be expressed in ways not considered religious. These are just some of the ways in which people can nurture their spirits:
  • relating to friends, family, and neighbours in ways that give and receive love, support, kindness, guidance, loyalty, and forgiveness;
  • expressing themselves creatively or artistically (e.g., woodworking or sewing, writing poetry or making music, painting or sculpting);
  • appreciating visual or performing arts (e.g., attending a concert, visiting an art gallery, or going to a movie);
  • reading books and engaging in conversations about the meaning of life;
  • paying attention to the movements of their emotional lives, the stirrings of the spirit evident in sadness, longing, love, anxiety/fear, anger, joy, pride, hope, and compassion;
  • enjoying the natural world (e.g., gardening or hiking, watching songbirds or sunsets, travelling to scenic places, spending time at a cottage, savouring the first snowfall or spring buds);
  • connecting with their bodies through exercise, meditation, massage, dancing, eating and drinking, or sexuality;
  • enjoying comedy and humour (e.g., light-hearted banter in everyday conversation, the capacity to see the joke in life’s discouraging moments, or comedies on the stage or in books or movies);
  • trying to live ethically, by integrating justice and fairness, peace-making, or green practices into their lives.

Love, trust, and forgiveness are important in your search for meaning within relationships. You grow spiritually as you learn to do these things:
  • love and care for yourself, express compassion for others, delight in the natural and human-made worlds, and cherish your place and participation in the web of life;
  • trust your intuitions and conscience, develop trustworthy relationships, trust that meaning can be found in every moment and place of your life, discern whom you can trust, and trust that the universe (or higher entity) is friendly no matter what happens;
  • forgive yourself for failures and wrongdoing, seek justice when you have been abused or wronged, let go of the desire for revenge when you have been hurt, accept that in the big picture you are accepted and valued just as you are.

Healthy spirituality gives a sense of peace, wholeness and balance among the physical, emotional, social and spiritual aspects of our lives. However, for most people the path to such spirituality passes through struggles and suffering, and often includes experiences that are frightening and painful. In these experiences you may struggle with questions such as these:
  • What do people think of me?
  • Where do I belong?
  • How can I effectively express my love or anger?
  • What does it mean to be true to myself?
  • What does the future hold?
  • What does dying and death mean to me?

Most of the fears behind such questions are in one way or another rooted in a fear of the unknown, a fear about areas of life that you don’t seem to have control over. Facing your fears openly and honestly helps you to figure out where you actually do have control, and to surrender your futile efforts to control what is beyond your power.
Fears, and the suffering that accompanies them, will always be part of life because unknowns are also part of life. However, fears do not need to cause panic. They can be viewed as invitations to open yourself to the resources and depths of your spirit, to the support and love of others who are also struggling to live meaningfully and to the larger spiritual realm that is beyond you. Opening yourself in this way can help you to live with hope, meaning and purpose, and inner peace in the midst of whatever circumstances you find yourself.
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Jun 8, 2008
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40,717
I'm am spiritual, but these days it's been very hard to feel spiritual, times feel sad and forlorn, but we persevere and I have hope and spirit that things will get better no matter what. xoxoxoxo
Same. It can be challenging (especially 2019 and 2020 personally) but these are the times I find it even more helpful to have a deeper connection with my inner peace and spirituality in this world. No matter what we go through we persevere as you write. We don't give up. We keep putting one foot in front of the other no matter how hard. One day at a time. One hour at a time. You know, that quote I am fond of sharing over and over and over haha. When going through hell just keep on going. I am paraphrasing. But it applies. And yes, things will get better.


(((HUGS))) @Bayek
 

Yelena

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Aug 7, 2019
Messages
330
I am an Agnostic, and I would celebrate any festivities as long as there is food involved! :lol-2:

DK :))
Love your style DK. Bring on the festivities!
 

OreoRosies86

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Dec 25, 2012
Messages
3,221
I was raised in a religious household. Though I am not religious now, I do feel there is someone or something looking out for me whether it’s a guardian angel or just the presence of my loved ones who have passed on.

I was staunchly atheist for so long, but have since had experiences that made me believe that maybe I’m not as alone as I thought I was.

I gravitate to Buddhism more than anything, though do not have a firm understanding of the Buddhist dogma. I know I like being in nature, and I try to live my life in a way that doesn’t hurt other people.
 

missy

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Jun 8, 2008
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40,717
gravitate to Buddhism more than anything
This is me too. I was raised in a traditional but not really religious household. We celebrated the Jewish holidays in a more secular way. Always being more about family and loving traditions than religious per se. Though my sister and I both had Hebrew School education each day after regular public school and we had Bat Mitzvahs at age 12. That was it for Hebrew School education.

I gravitate more to Buddhism than other teachings as well. To me it is the most balanced and fair minded of all.

Buddhism is about realization and experience, not institutions or divine authority. This makes it especially suited to those who consider themselves spiritual but not religious.
 

Yelena

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Aug 7, 2019
Messages
330
I was raised in a religious household. Though I am not religious now, I do feel there is someone or something looking out for me whether it’s a guardian angel or just the presence of my loved ones who have passed on.

I was staunchly atheist for so long, but have since had experiences that made me believe that maybe I’m not as alone as I thought I was.

I gravitate to Buddhism more than anything, though do not have a firm understanding of the Buddhist dogma. I know I like being in nature, and I try to live my life in a way that doesn’t hurt other people.
This is me too. I can appreciate some of the great values that my background (although I can’t say that church can really take credit for all of that) has given me but I have zero interest in attending church. I prefer to enjoy a walk in nature with loved ones than attend church. I also like Buddhist philosophy and have done some group meditation at a Buddhist centre. It was a very powerful experience and my goal for the next month is to declutter and set up a ‘calm’ space for myself and my daughter. I think different approaches suit different people in terms of spirituality and that’s okay, which is why do my best to avoid those judgmental people who think you are evil because you don’t do things their way.

I still think that science is the best way to understand the world though and will always use best available research to make decisions. I do understand though that the map that science gives us is incomplete and with every day that goes by we build on previous knowledge, so understandings change in light of new evidence.

The thing that really caught my attention was when you mentioned that you had some experiences that made you think that perhaps there is something else. This has happened to me as well. I know these experiences defy scientific explanation at this point in time. That’s okay. I am at peace with that. I can live with not understanding everything, but it always reminds to be open minded to possibilities. If it wasn’t for your response. I wouldn’t have shared this so here goes -Pressing the ‘Post Reply’ button now.
 

Alex T

Ideal_Rock
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Joined
Oct 24, 2012
Messages
5,596
I am agnostic. I don't believe & have never believed in God. It doesn't make sense, goes against the science of evolution & also, I believe, was invented to scare people & keep them in line with a deep rooted fear. I recall my elder sisters' mother in law, a devout Catholic, asking her when she would be having her brand new baby baptised. My teeny niece was 6 days old when my sister said actually no, we'd like her to find her own way in the world of religion. The MIL said sharply that this child will go to Hell should she die without Baptism. My sister showed her the door. Interestingly, my BIL denounced religion when he left his parents home.

My girls are educated with both science & religion, but already they are struggling to reconcile the two. They are leaning towards the belief that God is nonsense. I am happy to expose them to everything & anything. Should they decide to be a Trappist Monk & never speak to me again, then so be it. I am happy if they are happy in their convictions & choices.

But I am spiritual. I believe in nurturing my inner being & making sure others are safe & well.

And I respect YOUR beliefs & I would never force my option on you. Live & let live.
 

Arcadian

Ideal_Rock
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Joined
Sep 17, 2008
Messages
7,616
Not religious though raised in a southern baptist/catholic household. FAIC, you're religion is YOUR (general your) BUSINESS. I do not care what religion, and really don't get 2 effs about your (general your) religion.

your freedom ends where someone elses begins.

we all have our faults, just be a decent person at least.
 
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