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Any other new grad RNs out there?

Resonance.Of.Life

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
1,297
I just graduated in June with my BSN, PHN, and RN... and I am having a very difficult time finding a job even though I already work at a hospital as a CNA.
 

NTave

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Aug 15, 2011
Messages
279
Jobs are really tough right now with Medicare funding being cut..jobs at hospitals are being cut as well, and new grads need some training which costs more money than filling in with an experienced nurse. I hope something opens up for you soon, especially since you already are a hospital employee. The area we live in has had tons of hospital job cuts, nurses too, so we are all sweating it with each batch of cutbacks. Healthcare is usually one of the last places to get hit in a poor economy, so we are getting hit now where other areas were a year or two ago. I'll cross fingers for you, something is bound to open up, but its so frustrating:(
 

Resonance.Of.Life

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
1,297
Thanks Ntave: It's disconcerting because even though I am a hospital employee... I have been interviewing like crazy and end up being one of the only 6-10 people who interview for 1 to 2 positions and I always end up getting the rejection call. I've already started my CEUs, have done plenty of volunteer work, was an active member of my school's NSNA chapter.. and it seems like it's not enough. With school loans looming over my head (to start repayment in December) it's just stressful. I can easily get a job in psych or home health.. but both do not count towards the experience hospitals are looking for (acute medical care experience).
 

maplefemme

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
May 12, 2011
Messages
874
Hang in there, it can take a while with the state of healthcare right now, it's in such flux.
Just keep aggressively persuing interviews and talk with your peers to get their advice on specific units that are hiring, what key things they may be looking for in the interview for a good "fit" in that specific unit.
Is relocating an option? How about options in the private sector?
With loans looming you do what you have to do to stay afloat, even if it's beneath your scope, you're still in the trenches.
Good luck!
 

charbie

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Nov 16, 2008
Messages
2,512
I know it isn't everyones ideal job location, but try a nursing home. They are always looking for RNs in my area. It is tough work, really tough, but a great resume builder for those who want to make the switch to hospital work. If you can work in a nursing home as a nurse, you can work in a hospital is what they say...you have triple the patiennts with almost the same acuity these days since they spit people out of the hospital so fast!
 

NTave

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Aug 15, 2011
Messages
279
You are right, hospitals do not want to see psych or nursing home experience, and when you do start back up a a hospital I believe it puts you at a disadvantage:(, but, not entirely undoable. Relocating is an option, or possibly taking a job with a longer commute for a while until you get in a year or so. Also, can you take a per diem job in addition to your CNA? Or do they frown on that? I know where I work, once you get your RN license, they can no longer let people work in the CNA capacity.
I was inundated with older near retirement nurses when I started and it was difficult finding a job (this cycle happens every 10 years or so anyway, we just have extra help from the economy:) and I took a per diem on a med surg...once more hours opened up, they went to me first before an outsider because I was already an employee. I also did this same thing with my current position which I started 4 years ago, which only 2 years before I had been offered full time, now they only had an 8 hour weekend position, even with my critical care experience etc, but in a month or so they found more hours for me and I quickly moved into a full time spot with benefits. Also, can you defer your school loans? That must be weighing heavily on you. You are more than enough with your resume alone, and in normal times you would be snapped up like the gem you are, just keep that in mind:)
 

Resonance.Of.Life

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
1,297
@ Maplefemme: I have tried applying outside of my area, however it seems I only make it through to the first phone interview... and relocating to other states is not an option at this point since I'm brand new in practice and I've only taken on the California ratio (max of 1:5 for med surg and 1:2 for ICU) as far as practical experience. I know it's a tough market, because even though I said all the correct things in the interview.. there is always someone who has more on their resume ex: pharm tech experience, medic experience, military experience. It just sort of blows to be "BSN-RN, PHN... CNA"

@ Charbie: I tried looking for positions in the nursing homes around my area, and they all want managing experience since as an RN we're basically overseeing the LVNs at the nursing homes and at least 1 year of bed-side experience. And in this economy they can pretty much as for whatever they want.

@ NTave: I've tried all over the place, it's just there's a flux of graduates and not that many new grad positions. I am currently in a per diem position as a CNA but I work full-time hours to pay the bills and have some money left over to save. At our facility, even once we get our RN, we are just expected to know what our scope of practice is at work versus our credentials and to stay in our work title's scope of practice. As far as per diem, positions as an RN ... it looks very slim as they are requiring at least 1-3 years of experience from what I've been seeing.I cannot defer my school loans unless I am going at least half-time to school (darn, Sallie Mae).
 

Autumnovember

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
4,384
Hello!

I have not read any other responses....

However, I'm currently doing an Accelerated BSN-RN program with 7 months left to go. A few of my friends are already LPN's at hospitals and many of them have suggested to get certified in various things. For example, if you want to be an ER nurse there are certain certifications that make you a more "wanted." Ask your co-workers and they'll tell you the different types of certifications out there. If you go into an interview with this cert, that cert, and this cert...it'll be easier for you to sell yourself to them.

Also, have you tried applying for nursing home jobs?
 

maplefemme

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
May 12, 2011
Messages
874
charbie|1314546590|3003536 said:
I know it isn't everyones ideal job location, but try a nursing home. They are always looking for RNs in my area. It is tough work, really tough, but a great resume builder for those who want to make the switch to hospital work. If you can work in a nursing home as a nurse, you can work in a hospital is what they say...you have triple the patiennts with almost the same acuity these days since they spit people out of the hospital so fast!
I have to say I do not find this to be true, Charbie. A hospital setting has such a different set of demands and skill requirements and we have had RNs come to us with only nursing home experience and they can struggle terribly. We don't have time to babysit them when the proverbial $hit hits the fan, they MUST know their stuff and they don't because in a nursing home setting they have not been subjected to certain scenarios that are common to the hospital unit.
I have all due respect for RNs in nursing homes, don't get me wrong, you are sometimes juggling 30+ residents. But they are "residents", they aren't patients, who are coding for eg, who require a different kind of care and treatment.
Even the most basic things such as Central Lines and meds (they are typical only comfortable with PO) ECG interpretation, etc. They are in over their heads...
I agree with Autumnovember, upgrade with more certifications, some can be taken PT and for a low cost yet can really give you an edge on your resume when you are lacking practical experience on the floor.
Do you have a particular dept. you want to focus? Trauma, etc?
 

charbie

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Nov 16, 2008
Messages
2,512
maplefemme|1314576720|3003978 said:
charbie|1314546590|3003536 said:
I know it isn't everyones ideal job location, but try a nursing home. They are always looking for RNs in my area. It is tough work, really tough, but a great resume builder for those who want to make the switch to hospital work. If you can work in a nursing home as a nurse, you can work in a hospital is what they say...you have triple the patiennts with almost the same acuity these days since they spit people out of the hospital so fast!
I have to say I do not find this to be true, Charbie. A hospital setting has such a different set of demands and skill requirements and we have had RNs come to us with only nursing home experience and they can struggle terribly. We don't have time to babysit them when the proverbial $hit hits the fan, they MUST know their stuff and they don't because in a nursing home setting they have not been subjected to certain scenarios that are common to the hospital unit.
I have all due respect for RNs in nursing homes, don't get me wrong, you are sometimes juggling 30+ residents. But they are "residents", they aren't patients, who are coding for eg, who require a different kind of care and treatment.
Even the most basic things such as Central Lines and meds (they are typical only comfortable with PO) ECG interpretation, etc. They are in over their heads...
I agree with Autumnovember, upgrade with more certifications, some can be taken PT and for a low cost yet can really give you an edge on your resume when you are lacking practical experience on the floor.
Do you have a particular dept. you want to focus? Trauma, etc?
Well, I guess it depends on the nursing home where they came from...our skilled nursing subacute unit takes EVERYTHING: IV's, wound vacs, NG's, basically you name it, we do it. When the social workers at the hospital hear all the services we offer, they are floored. And even our LTC patients often require multiple IVs when they have an infection. Sorry you've had rough experiences with some SNF nurses, but I gotta stand up for my nurses here...they work their a$$es off, and after spending time in the hospital with my husband recently, he was in a TCU, and like a walk in the park compared to the crap my poor nurses are dealt!
 

sparklyheart

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
May 4, 2009
Messages
522
Keep applying.. and keep your head up! Most hospitals are being very cautious right now but they will all know more in the next few months as healthcare changes start to be implemented. I know mine is looking at the beginning of September as the time to know what the true implications of the healthcare changes will be. This is just a bad time but there ARE jobs and they ARE hiring.. Just focus on doing a really good job in your current position so that when you apply within your hospital they have good things to say about you. Everyone always talks and if you are good in your current role that can only help.. Good luck!!
 

maplefemme

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
May 12, 2011
Messages
874
Also, don't be too hard on yourself, it's a big a accomplishment and this is just the beginning, congrats on getting to this point.
I'm not saying don't look at nursing homes if that's where you want to be, or need to be because you can't get in at the hospital at this time.
I will say however, do not get stuck in a rut there if it's not where you want to end up.
If you get a position in a nursing home as an RN but want to ultimately be at the hospital then you need to take more classes in your spare time (some can be taken via correspondence at home) and get more certifications so that when you interview at the hospital they can see that you are focused and you have skills they can utilize.
Nursing home to hospital is not a lateral move and it seems like you are really passionate and go the extra mile with your extracurricular activities within the field, you'll do well, just hang in there and keep going ;))
 

maplefemme

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
May 12, 2011
Messages
874
charbie|1314577654|3003993 said:
maplefemme|1314576720|3003978 said:
charbie|1314546590|3003536 said:
I know it isn't everyones ideal job location, but try a nursing home. They are always looking for RNs in my area. It is tough work, really tough, but a great resume builder for those who want to make the switch to hospital work. If you can work in a nursing home as a nurse, you can work in a hospital is what they say...you have triple the patiennts with almost the same acuity these days since they spit people out of the hospital so fast!
I have to say I do not find this to be true, Charbie. A hospital setting has such a different set of demands and skill requirements and we have had RNs come to us with only nursing home experience and they can struggle terribly. We don't have time to babysit them when the proverbial $hit hits the fan, they MUST know their stuff and they don't because in a nursing home setting they have not been subjected to certain scenarios that are common to the hospital unit.
I have all due respect for RNs in nursing homes, don't get me wrong, you are sometimes juggling 30+ residents. But they are "residents", they aren't patients, who are coding for eg, who require a different kind of care and treatment.
Even the most basic things such as Central Lines and meds (they are typical only comfortable with PO) ECG interpretation, etc. They are in over their heads...
I agree with Autumnovember, upgrade with more certifications, some can be taken PT and for a low cost yet can really give you an edge on your resume when you are lacking practical experience on the floor.
Do you have a particular dept. you want to focus? Trauma, etc?
Well, I guess it depends on the nursing home where they came from...our skilled nursing subacute unit takes EVERYTHING: IV's, wound vacs, NG's, basically you name it, we do it. When the social workers at the hospital hear all the services we offer, they are floored. And even our LTC patients often require multiple IVs when they have an infection. Sorry you've had rough experiences with some SNF nurses, but I gotta stand up for my nurses here...they work their a$$es off, and after spending time in the hospital with my husband recently, he was in a TCU, and like a walk in the park compared to the crap my poor nurses are dealt!
Subacute is another thing entirely, it's not like a regular "nursing home" with long term care and dementia units etc.
So I'm sorry if I came across as not respecting you or your nurses, subacute is a whole other world and a very tough one at that!
We have subacute facilities and we have nursing homes, our nursing homes are basically lodges, one step up from assisted living.
 

Resonance.Of.Life

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
1,297
Thanks for all the great advice! Sorry I haven't been able to respond lately.. just had a couple of shifts in a row and I am physically and mentally beat. Around here, the term SNF refers to long-term care that is slightly above that of an assisted living facility, thus hospitals will not take that sort of experience into play when asking for 6months to a 1 year of experience to move into an acute care facility. But, I will be checking out subacute units in my area since it would be a good place to start as well as start on courses for speciality certs like woundcare or CCRN :)
 
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