Find your diamond
Find your jewelry
shape
carat
color
clarity

Am I crazy for wanting a c-section?

amc80

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jun 18, 2010
Messages
5,765
DandiAndi|1378900867|3518528 said:
I'm absolutely astounded that anyone would tell you you're crazy for wanting a c/s, or a vaginal birth, or a waterbirth with freakin' dolphins flapping about, and angels flying around playing harps for that matter. I mean for pete's sake!!! It's your body!!! It's your birth experience! Maybe it's because I work in an aspect of the baby-delivering industry, but man, I get really ticked off when I hear stuff like that.
Thank you! It's interesting, my friends who have had c-sections are very supportive, while the ones who had vaginal births think I'm nuts. One friend, in particular, is pretty vocal about it. She's had three babies and the youngest was practically laughed out (her husband was telling a joke and she was cracking up and the doctor had to tell her to stop laughing because it was pushing the baby out). The thing is, I'm sure the next delivery would be easier (especially if I wasn't induced), but even thinking about it gives me anxiety. So why spend an entire pregnancy stressed out about it?

Meg- I've thought a lot about the benefits of natural birth. I was very anti-c before I had to go through a birth and it was mainly because of the benefits associated with the process. We plan on having three kids, so potentially two c-sections. We originally wanted four (!), and if that were still the case it would be a much more difficult decision. Hey, maybe I'll be one of those girls who has a 30 minute labor and the baby is born on the way to the hospital! :) It is scary that it is major surgery. A friend of mine had some issues from her 2nd c-sec where her bladder attached to scar tissue or something crazy, and she had to have surgery to correct it. She accidentally got pregnant again and had a 3rd C without complication.

Laila619 said:
The only thing I fear about a C-section is the scar. I tend to scar easily so I am picturing a really bad scar across my stomach.
Same here. But, then again, post-baby there aren't many people seeing that area anyway!
 

soxfan

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jun 20, 2013
Messages
4,554
amc80|1378845824|3518117 said:
FrekeChild|1378844753|3518104 said:
If I have another one, I'm scheduling a c-section. My birth was no where near as bad as yours, but I wouldn't do it again.
Isn't it awful? I don't think anyone really prepares you for it. I always figured it would be bad, but the kind of bad that you'd forget as soon as the baby was in your arms.

Has anyone done marathons? I've done a full and several 1/2s. The morning of a race, when I'm getting out of bed at some horrible hour, I'm always telling myself I'm nuts. This same thinking goes all the way through to the finish line. Something always hurts and around miles 10-12 I really think I'm crazy. But then, as soon as I cross the finish line, I think "wow, that wasn't really that bad, I think I'll sign up for another." THAT'S what I thought birth would be like. Instead, I see it as a necessary evil. If that's what I have to do to get a baby, then fine, but I will seek alternatives (now, if only there were an easy, cheap alternative to pregnancy...).
half marathon runner here...yes! I am the same way! :lol: my first delivery with my daughter (8 pounds) was awful- pitocin, throwing up, vacuum, pushed for 4 hours, episiotomy, everything..

my second delivery with my son (who weighed 9 pounds!) was easier. MUCH easier. I didn't even TEAR! So the second one CAN be easier. However, if you want a C-section-get one. It's YOUR decision.

And the throwing up is from the epidural. But there's NO way I'd do it without drugs. I'd rather get shot in the face.
 

amc80

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jun 18, 2010
Messages
5,765
soxfan|1378915123|3518677 said:
But there's NO way I'd do it without drugs. I'd rather get shot in the face.
This made me spit out my latte. :lol:
 

Logan Sapphire

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Sep 5, 2003
Messages
2,382
I had a vaginal, pitocin-augmented birth that wasn't too bad (pushed out an 8lb 3oz, 21" baby in 20 mins) and had an awful recovery from it in terms of what it did to my pelvic floor. I'd always known that pregnancy/childbirth could make your pelvic floor loose, but had no idea the opposite could happen, which is my pelvic floor is too tight. Without going into details, let's just say the past few years have taken a major toll on my intimate life and marriage. A c-section surgery sounds awful to me because I'm a pain wimp, but I would do it to avoid the aftermath in my situation.

You should do what is best for baby AND you, and if a csection is the answer, go for it! Good luck!
 

marym

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jun 2, 2009
Messages
254
amc- your birth story sounds a lot like mine. It was absolutely miserable- I was induced, epi wore off right away and had to be re-done. Still didn't work, so I felt everything. I pushed for four hours and gave up due to extreme exhaustion. I got really scared because I just could not push anymore. I couldn't push hard enough to get her out on my own. The dr tried the vacuum to no avail and then had to use forceps. My husband said that I flew three feet off the table when he shoved those things in there, but at least he got her out. She was a much bigger baby than they had thought. They had guesstimated about seven pounds, but she was 8 lbs, 6 oz. I was absolutely huge, so I don't know how they got that so wrong. I also tore horribly. :( Then the placenta wouldn't come loose (for over an hour) so they thought they might have to do an emergency surgery for that. God, it was horrible. During pushing I just kept wishing they would say ok- time for a c-section since this isn't working. I guess I'm glad in the end that she was delivered vaginally (although the recovery was equally terrible-pelvic floor damage, etc) but if I ever had another baby (which I'm not going to) I would most definitely have a c-section to avoid all that misery. I do understand your apprehension completely. It really does a number on you when things go that way.
 

Dandi

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jan 9, 2006
Messages
5,318
I wouldn't stress about the scar. I scar and bruise so easily, I reckon if I sneezed on my arm it would bruise! My scar is a tad under 5 inches long and is a thin pink line that in places has faded to practically invisible, and will continue to do so. It's so low that it is even hidden under hipster undies. I really have barely given it any thought until now, when I measured it with a ruler! :bigsmile:
 

dani13

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Nov 12, 2004
Messages
6,183
DandiAndi|1378986848|3519323 said:
I wouldn't stress about the scar. I scar and bruise so easily, I reckon if I sneezed on my arm it would bruise! My scar is a tad under 5 inches long and is a thin pink line that in places has faded to practically invisible, and will continue to do so. It's so low that it is even hidden under hipster undies. I really have barely given it any thought until now, when I measured it with a ruler! :bigsmile:
Me too. My scar is very thin, low, and practically over my skin fold line- you can barely see it. Not bad at all.
 

amc80

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jun 18, 2010
Messages
5,765
I decided to make a meet and greet appointment with a new doctor. Aside from the birth/delivery issues, the office is very frustrating. It is a large practice which means there are tons of resources (like a great u/s machine). But the wait times are just ridiculous. I don't think I ever got in to see my doctor less than 60 minutes after my scheduled appointment time. I've been doing a lot of research and found a doctor who sounds great. I have an appointment to meet her in a couple of weeks (as a comparison, when I make an appointment with my doctor it's at least a two month wait). I'm feeling very good about this. Even if I decide to stay with my current doctor I will feel like I've looked at different options.

marym said:
Then the placenta wouldn't come loose (for over an hour) so they thought they might have to do an emergency surgery for that.
Wow that is frightening!! I'm glad it didn't come to that.
 

icekid

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Nov 17, 2004
Messages
7,470
Amc- I surely would not blame you for preferring a c/s after that experience! I had a relatively easy induction, but the recovery from tearing and swelling etc was much more significant than I ever imagined.

Just curious...for the mamas who have opted for a c/s, how did your insurance company feel about that? Being in medicine, I imagine they would not be too excited about paying for a surgery that was not "medically necessary."
 

Dandi

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jan 9, 2006
Messages
5,318
icekid|1379017757|3519651 said:
Amc- I surely would not blame you for preferring a c/s after that experience! I had a relatively easy induction, but the recovery from tearing and swelling etc was much more significant than I ever imagined.

Just curious...for the mamas who have opted for a c/s, how did your insurance company feel about that? Being in medicine, I imagine they would not be too excited about paying for a surgery that was not "medically necessary."
I'm not sure how Australia differs to the rest of the world, but it would actually be cheaper for me out of pocket to have an elective c/s. Mine was an emergency and the health insurance paid for most of it, but it included management of labour more than 12 hours, abnormal patographic progress, emergency c/s and special care nursery stays for Oscar due to the nature of the delivery. If I elect to have a c/s next time (and if it's another big baby, I certainly will) all going well, it will just be the c/s fee. If you are paying for health insurance it should just cover whatever you choose to do. Here in Australia, the only things that aren't covered much are cosmetic.
 

marym

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jun 2, 2009
Messages
254
amc80|1379008184|3519527 said:
I decided to make a meet and greet appointment with a new doctor. Aside from the birth/delivery issues, the office is very frustrating. It is a large practice which means there are tons of resources (like a great u/s machine). But the wait times are just ridiculous. I don't think I ever got in to see my doctor less than 60 minutes after my scheduled appointment time. I've been doing a lot of research and found a doctor who sounds great. I have an appointment to meet her in a couple of weeks (as a comparison, when I make an appointment with my doctor it's at least a two month wait). I'm feeling very good about this. Even if I decide to stay with my current doctor I will feel like I've looked at different options.

marym said:
Then the placenta wouldn't come loose (for over an hour) so they thought they might have to do an emergency surgery for that.
Wow that is frightening!! I'm glad it didn't come to that.
Thanks, yes it was probably the most frightening thing for sure. I worried my whole pregnancy about having a massive hemorrhage/emergency hist. due to stuck placenta. It was a risk factor since I had scar tissue removed prior to conceiving. Thank
God that it finally came loose, but the doctors (and I) were really starting to get nervous after an hour of it not budging. But all turned out well, thankfully. :)
 

misssoph

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Apr 22, 2009
Messages
121
No ,you aren't crazy, your experience!
I think you need to make up your mind prior to delivery though.
I have had 2 Caesars. The first was an emergency , , and the whole thing was traumatic and physically and mentally took a while to get over. My second was booked, went very smoothly, and recovery was much faster.
Best of luck
 

mlk

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Dec 5, 2010
Messages
262
DandiAndi|1379034012|3519782 said:
I'm not sure how Australia differs to the rest of the world, but it would actually be cheaper for me out of pocket to have an elective c/s. Mine was an emergency and the health insurance paid for most of it, but it included management of labour more than 12 hours, abnormal patographic progress, emergency c/s and special care nursery stays for Oscar due to the nature of the delivery. If I elect to have a c/s next time (and if it's another big baby, I certainly will) all going well, it will just be the c/s fee. If you are paying for health insurance it should just cover whatever you choose to do. Here in Australia, the only things that aren't covered much are cosmetic.
Is that in a public or private hospital Dandi?

Amc, I think you are absolutely justified for wanting a c/s next time. I didn't have any labour and admittedly had a tiny baby but my not so emergency c/s (3 hours notice doesn't completely qualify as an emergency I suppose) was like a walk in the park to me. The worst part of the whole surgery for me was the insertion of the canulas and the iv medications I was given for my pre-e but that is not usual. My recovery was very quick but as my bub was in hospital I didn't really have to worry about carrying a baby etc. it was very hard not being able to drive but that was because my son was in a major tertiary hospital which meant two buses crossing the city. One thing I was planning but never got around to was buying a pair of those recovery shorts. Will definitely get a pair of those if there is a next time.
 

Dandi

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jan 9, 2006
Messages
5,318
Private hospital mlk. There would be no out of pocket expenses for a public delivery in a public hospital, c/s or otherwise. My biggest issue is I know all the private obs in town through work, and I'm majorly picky ;))
 

mlk

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Dec 5, 2010
Messages
262
Oh I'm getting confused cos my ob was no gap dandi!
 

Dandi

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jan 9, 2006
Messages
5,318
They are all different. They get their payments from Medicare and then on top of that can choose how much extra they want to charge in the form of a gap, if anything at all. Your level of cover depends on how much of the gap is covered. Lucky for you your ob must not charge a gap, or your PHI covered it all. Nice! :bigsmile:
 

mlk

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Dec 5, 2010
Messages
262
Yeah there was no gap, just an exorbitant management fee due at 20 weeks!
 

tara3056

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jul 3, 2012
Messages
317
I don't often check in to this area of PS, but had to reply to this thread. Firstly, whatever you decide to do, I totally respect your reasons for perhaps wanting a c-section and don't think you are crazy. However, I have had recent experiences with a traumatic birth and then a much better second birth, so I feel obliged to share them in case you decide against the elective c. I like the idea someone suggested of giving natural labor a try and then electing a c-section if things begin to drag out or go poorly.

My first birth was an induction at 41 weeks. I was scared to death about it and desperately did not want to be induced, but my blood pressure was running high (due to nerves every time I had an OB appt - it was fine when I'd check it at home, but ran so high at appts that I was getting major pressure to induce) and my baby was predicted to be large, so I gave in and let them induce me. A mistake, I think now. Long story made shorter: my cervix was not favorable so I had to have Cervadil inserted the night before. I couldn't have any food after showing up at the hospital... all in, I went 36 hours without food and was so weak by the time the pushing phase started that I felt terrible. The OB broke my water and started pitocin the next morning. Contractions became unmanageable and I got an epidural, which worked great for the first 3-4 hours and then slowly started becoming less effective until, by the time I hit transition, I felt *everything*. I could even move my own legs, which everyone said shouldn't be possible. I suffered for hours, stuck at 7cm, and miserable. When I finally reached 10cm, I pushed for nearly 4 hours. I was exhausted and nearly ended up with a c-section because I just felt like I had nothing left to give to push my son out. I ended up with an episiotomy, and my LO broke my tailbone as he was coming down. The broken tailbone was the worst part of recovery, because it was immensely painful for weeks and still pretty sore even 9-10 months later. The episiotomy healing sucked, and I had to do lots of kegels to regain bladder control.

That said, I still think my recovery -- had it not been for the broken tailbone -- was superior to what I've heard the recovery can be like from a c-section. More importantly, I felt I'd been robbed in some way from the birth experience I wanted, so when I got pregnant this more recent time, I really hoped upon hope to give birth vaginally again but to go into labor naturally and to not have to push so long. This time, I was more proactive about finding an OB who would listen to my concerns, and who would not pressure me to induce right at 41 weeks unless a NST / BPP said there was a medical reason to get the baby out asap. My OB was great and made me much more relaxed about coming to appts, so my blood pressure never spiked like it did with my son. At my 40 week appt, we agreed that I would come back for a 41 week appt and do the NST then, and then talk about setting an induction date for close to 42 weeks if needed. Luckily, it wasn't needed. At 40 weeks + 3 days, I started getting contractions but they weren't painful, so I couldn't tell if they were real contractions or just the baby balling up and stretching inside me, or even Braxton Hicks. But when they kept coming like clockwork every 3-4 minutes for 2 hours (still not painful though!!), I figured I was probably in labor :) I'd been told conflicting things - like go to the hospital when you are 5-1-1 (contrax every 5 min, lasting 1 min each for 1 hour) - vs wait to go to hospital until you have trouble talking through contractions. Either way, I wanted to labor at home for as long as possible, so I hung out happily at home until my water broke in a big gush. Then it was time to head to the hospital. I was at 3 cm when I showed up and, several hours (with continuing painless contrax) later, was still at 3cm, so I consented to them starting pitocin at the lowest level. That sped things up; I got an epidural; it worked great this time. I was at 6-7 cm right after getting the epidural, and delivered my daughter just 1 hour later, after pushing through only 3 contractions. It was less than 10 minutes of pushing! I tore just a little along my episiotomy scar, but healing from that has been super easy. No broken tailbone and no pelvic floor damage this time. In short, my 2nd labor was awesome and I really feel "healed" in a way from it. Like it made up for the horrible first labor, and I feel so good about my body doing what it was supposed to do on its own, without being induced. I'm SO glad I had this experience.

I obviously can't say the same would happen for you, but I will cross my fingers for you that you get the labor you want the second time around. Labor still sucks and is still painful no matter what, but it doesn't have to be such a terrible experience. My 2nd baby was smaller than my first, too, probably because I didn't go overdue (she was 8 lb 4 oz vs my son at 8 lb 12 oz). On a somewhat related note, I just had my gallbladder removed a couple of days ago. It was a laproscopic surgery, so fairly easy, but they did puncture my ab muscles in at least one place, and it's very sore there. I've been thinking a c-section would be sooo much worse, but some women really seem to do well with Cs, so I'm sure it's totally subjective. Whatever you decide, thanks for reading this wayyy-too-long post and best of luck to you!!
 

amc80

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jun 18, 2010
Messages
5,765
Tara- thanks for sharing your story! Your second birth experience sounds so much better than the first.

Update- I had my appointment with the potentially new OB this morning. She was very, very nice. I told her about my birth experience and she basically said she can see why I want a c-section and she is okay with whatever I want. She also said that once I get a BFP I can call and she will order blood work. I also liked that she seems more familiar with temping/opks than my old doctor. I ended up officially switching and she gave me a pap right there. I also requested blood work, so I'm getting my thyroid and vit d checked. I'm really happy with the decision and knowing I don't have to go through labor is already a huge relief.
 

Dandi

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jan 9, 2006
Messages
5,318
Great news amc, I'm so glad your concerns have been alleviated regarding your next delivery!
 

LaraOnline

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Feb 24, 2008
Messages
3,365
DandiAndi|1378900867|3518528 said:
I'm absolutely astounded that anyone would tell you you're crazy for wanting a c/s, or a vaginal birth, or a waterbirth with freakin' dolphins flapping about, and angels flying around playing harps for that matter. I mean for pete's sake!!! It's your body!!! It's your birth experience! Maybe it's because I work in an aspect of the baby-delivering industry, but man, I get really ticked off when I hear stuff like that.
I absolutely agree! I was a real hippy when I first met my husband, and was determined to go totally drug free / natural birth. I even scheduled midwives for a home birth - but my husband (a biological scientist) absolutely refused. So then I wrote to the hospital asking fora water birth at the hospital LOL :cheeky: Well, I changed my mind on 'home birth' and the importance of 'natural' since about 24 hours into my first birth lol.

I think if you want a c-sec, you should have it!! You'll be caring for this child your whole life, your preferences and pain threshold, your concerns - your primal fears lol - should be respected.

I have had three drug free births, and each time had the shudders for months after. It is true that they get 'better' (as in you actually feel you have a good chance of living through the process) and you do get more confident. And they do get quicker. But for me, quicker meant 'more intense'. My third it hurt like bejesus (are we even allowed to admit that??) but there was a level of control and I managed to do the whole thing standing up! (because I was scared of tearing). And yes recovery was quick. (all the better to serve dinner to all the visiting rellies - my husband didn't have to take a minute off work either!)

I actually firmly dispute that caesarians are 'technically' more dangerous than natural birth - I mean in the third world with no medical assistance there's a hella lot of casualties, mother and/or child. Just look at the experiences of women in Papua New Guinea. And what a way to go! Wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy. The only reason so much pain is culturally tolerated or even expected in childbirth is because it's always been that way - funny that, we don't see toothache is 'to be expected' any more.

If you do decide to go for the natural birth, please disregard all this frank talk and MEDITATE through your process. It's the only way!!!!! So, confidence is key. I would strongly consider hypnotherapy sessions in the lead up, to make you feel on top of your game. :)

If you go for a c-section though, please make sure you have help and respect the recovery process. Best of luck with your choice!

ETa: oops I see you've already made the choice! Well, good for you! And now get your black book out, because you need assistance while you heal! ;-)
 

katharath

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Mar 5, 2013
Messages
2,833
I hope you don't mind if I post my story (even though it looks like many others have replied with great posts!)

It's just that I did have my first son vaginally, and due to how horrific it was, my dr basically insisted on my having a c/s with my second son. So I've had both.

I won't go into all the details as it would take SO long...first son's birth was fine at first (born at exactly 40 wks, no complications up until then). After developing pre-e they induced me; his delivery was rough. I had fourth degree tearing which lead to a rare complication that happens @1% of the time after birth. It left permanent damage to my entire "area" which required surgery a few months after his birth (but didn't fix it all - it's something I'll have to deal with forever. And it's really too personal to go into further detail). On top of that I also had other complications from the birth that kept me in the hospital for a good 8 days after giving birth and literally confined to bed. It was awful bc my son was in NICU for oxygen (he was almost 9 lbs full term, but he was reacting to drugs that they gave me for the pre-e while still in utero). So what that means is that I didn't get to see or hold my son for five days. Five days!!! It was so awful. I was bed bound and he was stuck in NICU.

Anyway. Yes , that's the short version...

When I had my younger son three years later, I had switched to a much better doctor (much of what went wrong the first time could be laid at the drs feet). I knew from the beginning that I would have to have a scheduled c/s due to the mess that was left after my first son's birth. My dr of course agreed and it was sort of lovely going through the entire pg knowing he would come "planned". Well - fast forward to week 37.5 and I end up with pre-e again. I went into the hospital and luckily my dr was there and on call, he did an emergency c/s. It went SMOOTH AS SILK!!!! Everything went perfectly! We avoided needing the same drug that caused first son to go into NICU by doing a fast c/s. Baby was just as healthy as could be and 8.5 lbs. scored a 10 on the apgar!

I did so well that they let me go home 36 hrs later (my choice). They told me the key to recovery was to get up and MOVE - and when they let me up out of bed 8 hrs after the c/s, it did hurt, but I moved, bc I wanted to recover fast and go home.

I had a great recovery (within 2 weeks I was completely fine). VERY minimal scar - you can hardly see it.

I sure wish I could've had a CS with my first baby!! But it wouldn't have even crossed my mind back then - I thought they were scary and awful. Now I like to tell my story to illustrate my great experience with cs.

Hope this helps and good luck to you!!
 

kat08

Rough_Rock
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
100
FancyPantsSparkles|1378829007|3517928 said:
A little crazy, but based on the birth experience you had previously, I totally understand the want for something perfectly different. That said, you're asking for major abdominal surgery where you will have to recover while waking up every few hours to feed and care for a newborn. That scares the crap out of me!

I've been doing a lot of research on labor and delivery and found that many women who are induced tend to have more problems/complications with delivery and actually about 75% of women who are induced before they have reached 4cm will have a c-section. Have you considered waiting to deliver when the baby is ready to come? I'm not sure that you mentioned the weight your son was at birth though, so I'm sorry if I missed it. I know you mentioned the dr thinking he would be on the larger size, so I'm just curious with the weight.

Regardless, you have to do what is right for you. I watched a good friend have a c-section (baby was breech) and she was in HORRIBLE pain for a good month after baby was born and was very limited on what she could do on her own due to the surgery. Will you have someone around to help you 24-hours a day if you do opt for a c-section?
Yours is a tough situation. It's completely understandable how you feel and that you're scared of another traumatic labor. I agree with the PP, though, that it might be a better situation for you if you're not induced next time. And it really is true that the second pregnancy is usually much easier. I had a very long first labor (22 hours active labor) and ended up pushing for four hours. I was so exhausted that I actually slept between contractions as I was pushing AND I was hungry. I really wanted to eat while I was pushing; I'm sure it would have helped, but of course, that's not an option in a hospital. I look back, and it's amazing my doctor didn't insist on a C-section for me since the pushing was taking so long (but other than taking a long time, nothing else was wrong). She was really patient.

My second labor only lasted about 3.5 hours for the whole thing, and it simply was not as hard on my body. I didn't throw up (I did the first labor), and the laboring wasn't nearly as painful. I was surprised when I found out I'd already gone through transition. The worst part was the "ring of fire"--that never gets better--but other than that, I was really surprised at how different the whole thing felt from the first time around. It was like my body had learned what to do.

Only you know what's best for you, though. If you're not able to work through your fear/trauma, the fear could make your second labor not a good experience. I agree with others about talking to your doctor about the risks, and a therapist, and then deciding. If you still want a C-section, then you should do what you feel is best for you. :)
 

amc80

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jun 18, 2010
Messages
5,765
More great stories! Thanks for sharing. I'm about 99% sure I will have a c-section (you know, assuming I get pregnant first). Aside from the mental aspect and the fear of going through that again, I am not sure I want to risk more damage to my pelvic floor. I was able to get it back to *almost* normal through physical therapy, but I'm not sure if the repeat stress would be a good idea. I'll continue the conversation with my doctor and see how it goes.
 

innerkitten

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Aug 1, 2003
Messages
5,623
I don't think you are crazy for wanting one. I only have one child and I'm not having anymore. But if I was I would want a c section too. I did not have an easy time either had had a lot of pain afterwards ( could not sit and wasn't healed for about 6 weeks) and scar tissue that never went away 100% and still bothers me.
 

momhappy

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Mar 3, 2013
Messages
4,660
Every experience is different, so there's really no way to compare.
I had vaginal births and my sister had c-sections. Her recoveries were massive (and awful) compared to mine, and one of my vaginal births had some fairly major complications and my recovery was still WAY easier/quicker than hers. Personally, unless it was medically necessary, I wouldn't choose a c-section.
 

jstarfireb

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Mar 24, 2007
Messages
6,231
You're not crazy at all! I've said for years that I want an elective C-section if I ever have a baby. I have hypermobility, which means that all the ligaments in my body are unusually loose, and that can lead to major pelvic issues when combined with pushing. I've gone so far as to say I wouldn't even consider pregnancy unless I already had doctor lined up who agrees to do an elective section. I'm a doctor, so I understand and accept the potentially increased risks involved in a section. I have several friends who have had C-sections with easy recoveries and some who have had more difficult times, and as a doc I've seen plenty of births done both ways. There is also a big difference in my mind between an elective section and an emergency one. Whatever happens, I wish you well! If you do decide on a section, I would recommend reading up on it before you're due and preparing yourself with some tips and tricks (for example, wearing compression garments can help with the pain).

ETA: Elective sections (or sections in general) can be a bit of an issue when you are planning to have more children afterward. The scar on your uterus increases the risk of placental issues. The more sections you've had, the higher your risk. So a lot of the above is colored by the fact that I for sure would only want to have one child if any. I'm in my 30s, so I feel quite secure in that decision. You may want to consider whether your second child will be your last or if you'll want more.
 

amc80

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jun 18, 2010
Messages
5,765
I wanted to update this thread. I had my CS on 1/26. Ironically, any attempt at a traditional birth likely would have ended up in a CS anyway since T was over 9lbs at 38 weeks.

I am so glad I had the CS. It was so much easier of a process. When T was born, I was fairly rested and able to cope with a newborn. With B, I was so exhausted that I only wanted to sleep. As a result, I bonded much quicker with T than with B.

My recovery was much faster as well. Here I am, 6 weeks out, and basically feel great. It took at least 4-6 months to feel that way with B. The first week or so was pretty rough, but nothing unexpected or that pain meds couldn't handle.

Thanks again to everyone who contributed to this thread. I hope someone else finds it helpful!
 

msop04

Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Dec 3, 2011
Messages
9,768
amc80|1426226110|3846482 said:
I wanted to update this thread. I had my CS on 1/26. Ironically, any attempt at a traditional birth likely would have ended up in a CS anyway since T was over 9lbs at 38 weeks.

I am so glad I had the CS. It was so much easier of a process. When T was born, I was fairly rested and able to cope with a newborn. With B, I was so exhausted that I only wanted to sleep. As a result, I bonded much quicker with T than with B.

My recovery was much faster as well. Here I am, 6 weeks out, and basically feel great. It took at least 4-6 months to feel that way with B. The first week or so was pretty rough, but nothing unexpected or that pain meds couldn't handle.

Thanks again to everyone who contributed to this thread. I hope someone else finds it helpful!
I just read this entire thread, and I'm so happy you came back and posted, amc!! I'm due in September, and my OB/GYN told me that he would be surprised if I was able to have a vaginal delivery -- long story short, I'm tilted and very narrow... (if only my hips showed that... :: le sigh ::) :|

At first, I was a little disappointed that I wouldn't get to "experience a real birth" but, honestly, I'm sort of relieved. I'm not big on pain and unpredictability, so I think a CS is best for my nerves, if anything. To be honest, I'm still scared to death, and I refuse to watch any youtube vids showing ANY type of birthing process -- it just grosses me out and provides additional stress. ::)

I found an article that talks about a gentler, more natural-feeling CS experience that I thought I'd share. It's not a major change, but makes it feel less like a surgery and more like a "birth" for mothers. I just really want to hold my baby and not have her taken away immediately after delivery...

Anywhoooo, let me know if any of you have had a more pleasant experience like the one explained in this article... :))

amc, I'm so glad you had a much better delivery this time!! :wavey: :wavey:
 
Be a part of the community It's free, join today!

Need Something Special?

Get a quote from multiple trusted and vetted jewelers.

Holloway Cut Advisor



Diamond Eye Candy

Click to view full-size image.
Top