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19K White Gold v.s. Platinum..Help needed ASAP >_<

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MerLine

Rough_Rock
Joined
Nov 9, 2006
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Hi guyz!

I need some advice again. I''m planning to get a new setting for my engagement ring. Something in white metal because my original setting is in 18K yellow gold. When I visited a shop to have one custom made the jeweler gave me some advice as to how to create it. I originally wanted a platinum setting created but he told me that it scratches very easily and suggested instead that I use 19K white gold. He says that its quite a hard metal, is naturally white (as opposed to 18K white gold which is yellow and has to be rhodiumized) so is less maintenance and is cheaper than using platinum. Now before this I''ve never ever heard of 19K white gold so I''ve been doing some research. I hear is a very new technology and so far what my jeweler said is true. My real concern is does it really NOT turn yellow like the 18K white gold? Reading about it is all good and well but I sorta want to hear it from actual people who have it or have any experience with it. I also found out that 19K white gold isn''t really very white. It still has a tinge of yellow naturally and still needs to be rhodiumized to keep it white...my jeweler said it doesn''t need to be rhodiumized at all just polished once in awhile. if that is the case then its pretty much the same as 18K white gold isn''t it? If that''s the case isn''t platinum better? But then I also heard that once platinum develops a patina there is nothing you can do about it that not even a polish will clear it up whereas with 19K white gold a polish will bring it back to its original shine. So...now I''m all confused! Any input from you guyz would be a great help. Thanks very much in advance! And sorry for making this so long >_b]
 

Christa

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Aug 15, 2006
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613
I don''t have an answer, except to say that even 14k white gold can stay white without rodium, depending on the alloy. I have a 1930''s vintage 14k wg wedding set that is perfectly white.

I''m curious to hear the experts'' answers about 19k instead of 18k. It seems in my head, as someone who doesn''t really know anything
that since 19k has more gold, which is naturally yellow, it should be *harder* to keep white than 18k or even 14k. Apparently that''s not the case, and I''d love to hear why.

One more thing--18 or 19k will be a softer metal than 14k, just so you know.
 

the other Jake

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Nov 9, 2006
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423
I don''t know much about 19k wg but the patina platinum develops can be polished away . I found this article quite interesting. You might wanna take a look at it.
 

Garry H (Cut Nut)

Super_Ideal_Rock
Trade
Joined
Aug 15, 2000
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14,581
i am still waiting for a compelling set of evidence as to why 19K is not just a marketing concept.

I have been a jeweller for 3 decades and have a geology science background, so have a little metalurgy knowledge. I have 6 full time bench workers.

19/24 = bright orange gold 5/24 = white metals
Can this be whiter?

Personally I quite like a 9K white gold alloy that we use here.
9/24 gold and 15/24 white metals including palladium and platinum and silver
 

diamondseeker2006

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Jan 11, 2006
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55,054
Date: 11/23/2006 12:18:16 AM
Author: Christa
I don''t have an answer, except to say that even 14k white gold can stay white without rodium, depending on the alloy. I have a 1930''s vintage 14k wg wedding set that is perfectly white.

I''m curious to hear the experts'' answers about 19k instead of 18k. It seems in my head, as someone who doesn''t really know anything
that since 19k has more gold, which is naturally yellow, it should be *harder* to keep white than 18k or even 14k. Apparently that''s not the case, and I''d love to hear why.

One more thing--18 or 19k will be a softer metal than 14k, just so you know.

I see this posted frequently but it is not necessarily true. It depends on the alloy used. Here''s a quote explaining it:

"The comments in your link are correct. The hardness of the final product is a more complicated question than the simple karatage of the metal. Properly worked, some alloys of 18k can be quite durable. For commercially cast type pieces, 14k yellow gold is usually more durable than 18k yellow gold. 18k white is usually more durable than 14k white."
Neil Beaty
GG(GIA) ISA NAJA
Professional Appraisals in Denver



 

etienneperret

Rough_Rock
Joined
Oct 3, 2005
Messages
49
Merlin,
I suggest you find out exactly what the alloy is that your jeweler wants to use. Stay away from any white gold alloy that has nickel in it. Nickel is not good if it is going to touch the body. Many people develop a nickel allergy in the course of their lives due to the jewelry they wear. In Europe nickel based white gold alloys are no longer legal. White gold can be alloyed with palladium, however this metal is just as soft as platinum.

Platinum is totally inert and does not cause allergic reactions. If you are concerned about the finish or hardness of platinum there are special heat treatable alloys that are much harder than the standard 900/1000 or 950/100 alloys that most jewelers use. Steven Kretchmer developed several alloys that take a very nice polish which lasts much longer and can be re-polished quite easily.
 

Christa

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Aug 15, 2006
Messages
613
Date: 11/23/2006 12:46:02 AM
Author: Garry H (Cut Nut)
i am still waiting for a compelling set of evidence as to why 19K is not just a marketing concept.

I have been a jeweller for 3 decades and have a geology science background, so have a little metalurgy knowledge. I have 6 full time bench workers.

19/24 = bright orange gold 5/24 = white metals
Can this be whiter?

Personally I quite like a 9K white gold alloy that we use here.
9/24 gold and 15/24 white metals including palladium and platinum and silver
That''s exactly my thinking, but I hear 18k held up around here as superior to and whiter than 14k. So maybe I''m not completely missing something?

Diamondseeker, thanks for the clarification. I was told by a jeweler that lower-carat gold is generally more durable (maybe softer wasn''t the right word), but I guess you''re right--it would depend totally on the alloys used.
 

justjulia

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Apr 4, 2006
Messages
2,308
I would ask what his mix is. I like how the steely grey look of platinum compliments my skin. I have a rhr that is 14k white gold and it has never needed r plating--but boy it really shows scratches. My plat engagement ring is channel set, so there is not a lot of smooth platinum visible on top to worry about scratches. My other lhr is eternity plat, so again, not a lot visible. I just like the feel of plat, the weight of plat, the greyness of it, the idea that it will not wear away with all the rough things I do with my hands. My jeweler has polished my plat rings back to their shine easily, but honestly I love the patina and have actually worked on "getting my patina on."
 

Garry H (Cut Nut)

Super_Ideal_Rock
Trade
Joined
Aug 15, 2000
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14,581
Most white golds are proprietary mixes and no one will reveal the secret herbs and spices

14K yellow is a lot springier and harder to bend than 18K, but it is more brittle and bad for hand fabrication.

14K white is usually whiter than most white 18K''s.

But the thing you should do is ask to see the 18K and platinum un plated - 2 samples of each - one polished and 1 with a brushed finish.

We have such samples to show clients and let them bend them too - it amazes people the differences - but simple it is not
 

justjulia

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Apr 4, 2006
Messages
2,308
Date: 11/23/2006 6:55:32 PM
Author: Garry H (Cut Nut)
Most white golds are proprietary mixes and no one will reveal the secret herbs and spices

14K yellow is a lot springier and harder to bend than 18K, but it is more brittle and bad for hand fabrication.

14K white is usually whiter than most white 18K''s.

But the thing you should do is ask to see the 18K and platinum un plated - 2 samples of each - one polished and 1 with a brushed finish.

We have such samples to show clients and let them bend them too - it amazes people the differences - but simple it is not
Very interesting. Wow, l learn something new here every day. I have an 18k white bracelet that has definitely shown some yellowing with time (or maybe it was always that way and with the ring I had something to finally compare it to), even though I wear the 14k ring a lot more (and has stayed white).
 
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