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Thoughts about Jada Pinkett Smith boycotting the Oscars

missy

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http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/18/entertainment/oscars-boycott-spike-lee-jada-pinkett-smith-feat/

and

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/19/movies/spike-lee-jada-pinkett-smith-oscars.html?_r=0


Invoking the Rev. Martin Luther King's legacy on his birthday, two prominent African-Americans announced Monday that they will boycott this year's Academy Awards over a lack of diversity among nominees.

Oscar nominations
12 photos: Oscar nominations
Filmmaker Spike Lee and actress Jada Pinkett Smith posted separate messages Monday saying they would not be attending the February 28 ceremony. The Oscars have drawn criticism after an all-white slate of major nominees was announced Thursday for the second year in a row.

"We cannot support it and mean no disrespect ... But, how is it possible for the second consecutive year all 20 contenders under the acting category are white? And let's not even get into the other branches," Lee wrote on Instagram. "Forty white actors in two years and no flava at all. We can't act?! WTF!!"

"Dr. King said, 'There comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor politic, nor popular, but he must take it because conscience tells him it's right,' " continued Lee, the outspoken director of such racially charged films as "Do the Right Thing" and "Malcolm X."

Lee said the " 'real' battle" over racism in Hollywood is not with the Academy Awards but in "the executive offices of the Hollywood studios and TV and cable networks," where gatekeepers decide which projects get made and which don't.

"People, the truth is we ain't in those rooms, and until minorities are, the Oscar nominees will remain lilly white," he wrote.

In a video posted to Facebook, Pinkett Smith said she would not even watch the Oscars on TV this year. Her husband, Will Smith, had been considered an Oscar contender for his role in "Concussion" but was not nominated.


"Today is Martin Luther King's birthday, and I can't help but ask the question: Is it time that people of color recognize how much power, influence, that we have amassed, that we no longer need to ask to be invited anywhere?" she said.

"Begging for acknowledgement, or even asking, diminishes dignity and diminishes power. And we are a dignified people, and we are powerful," she said. "So let's let the Academy do them, with all grace and love. And let's do us, differently."

'Fresh Prince' actress slams Jada Pinkett Smith's Oscars boycott

#OscarsSoWhite trended on social media last week after a number of black Oscar hopefuls, including "Beasts of No Nation's" Idris Elba; "Creed" star Michael B. Jordan; that movie's writer-director, Ryan Coogler; and the cast of N.W.A biopic "Straight Outta Compton" were overlooked by academy voters.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences has faced years of criticism that its 7,000-plus members who vote on the Oscars are mostly older, male, white and out of touch with today's moviegoers.

Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs, who is black, said over the weekend that she was "disappointed" by the Oscar nominations.

"But this is not to take away the greatness" of the nominated films, she told Deadline. "This has been a great year in film, it really has, across the board. You are never going to know what is going to appear on the sheet of paper until you see it."

Still, Isaacs acknowledged that the academy's efforts at boosting diversity among its membership and throughout Hollywood were moving too slowly. "We have got to speed it up," she said.

A longtime critic of the academy, Lee received an honorary Oscar at a banquet in Hollywood in November, where he said, "This industry is so far behind sports, it's ridiculous. It's easier to be president of the United States as a black person than be head of a (movie) studio. Honest."

Next month's 88th Academy Awards will be hosted by black actor-comedian Chris Rock, who has largely remained quiet about the #OscarsSoWhite controversy. Friday on Twitter, however, Rock referred to the show as "the white BET Awards."


 

momhappy

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My thoughts (which are few because I don't care if Jada boycotts the Oscars or not) can be summed up in two words: Sour. Grapes.
 

packrat

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At some point everyone needs to acknowledge that not everyone does everything in such a manner that everyone is going to love what everyone does.

At some point everyone needs to acknowledge that not everything is b/c of the color of your skin.
 

Rhea

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I don't see many films. I think I've been to the cinema twice in the past year. Were there any good films with black or other non-white actors this year? If not, why not? Are they not getting roles? If so, were the films not popular and therefore not nominated? I'd be interested to know what films had a non-white main character. If they aren't being made, then a non-white actor cannot be nominated.

I'm tempted to write it off as sour grapes but it could be institutional racism whereby non-white actors don't get parts and therefore don't get nominated. I could see how that'd be possible. But then that needs to be addressed in a way that doesn't focus on one day and one event so that it's not perceived to be throwing toys out of the pram by the general Oscar watching audience. That, to me, is all boycotting is going to do.
 

ame

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While I do believe Will should've gotten nominated, or at least that movie, as well as the NWA movie, I do think her tirade is silly. This awards season in general, not just the Oscars, was not very diverse as a whole--but it was definitely noticeably absent of many African American nominees. Aziz Ansari was nominated, as was Rami Malek. But other than the Critics Choice Awards, I did not see much in the way of an African American nomination set. It was pretty sad, and I am as "lilywhite" in appearance as it gets. I believe that's the choice of words she used.

"aunt viv" called her out, and I do believe that she also was sour grapes since she and Will have a history, but I do agree that there is a serious dearth of diversity across the board. So I don't dispute the underlying point of the message. But the whole tirade? Stupid.
 

kenny

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This is a tough one.
On one hand Oscar award nominations should be solely based on merit.
There should not be quotas for any group, race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, age, appearance, handicap etc. etc. etc. ... except of course talent.

There are many groups.
They could insist the number of nominations for their group match their population percentages.
Even if that mathematical nightmare was enforced, next they could insist the awards themselves were also """""won""""" in representative numbers.

Awards are supposed to be based on talent, but such a system would result in some winners with more talent being intentionally denied an award because they are a member of a group.

IMO the problem is not in who gets nominated for awards, it's in who is doing the nominating.
Only members of the Academe of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences can nominate people for awards, and the members are overwhelmingly old white men.
Why?
Only members of the Academe can nominate others to become members of the Academe. Hmmm. :knockout:
I suggest mandatory diversity be introduced and enforced in Academe membership.

Of course if it's legislated that 50.8% of Academe members must be women, 13.2% must be black and 17.1% must be latino, etc. (numbers from Wiki), that doesn't guarantee they'd nominate and vote for only for members of their group ... but it would move things in the direction of fairness.

If there should be quotas anywhere it should be in the makeup of the Academe.
Clearly this old white boys' club isn't recognizing talent of all groups ... and I refuse to consider a suggestion that it is because those other groups just have less talent.
 

telephone89

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I don't disagree with their intent and the overall message - but she really gets on my nerves haha.

I do believe that there is still institutional racism alive and well in Hollywood. Aziz Ansari actually discussed it in one of his episodes. Hiring white people to play minorities, or only wanting ethnic people who have stereotypical accents/jobs/etc. That doesn't leave a lot of room for non-whites to get 'regular' leading roles, which means that they get such a small sliver of hope at being nominated.

It does make me sad to think that over the past 2 years this bunch of very influential people thought that NO minorities were good enough for a nomination. Not a single one. (as an actor)
 

amc80

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packrat|1453297349|3978494 said:
At some point everyone needs to acknowledge that not everyone does everything in such a manner that everyone is going to love what everyone does.

At some point everyone needs to acknowledge that not everything is b/c of the color of your skin.
This, exactly.

Leonardo DiCaprio never wins. Must be because he's white.
 

LLJsmom

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Rhea|1453298951|3978509 said:
I don't see many films. I think I've been to the cinema twice in the past year. Were there any good films with black or other non-white actors this year? If not, why not? Are they not getting roles? If so, were the films not popular and therefore not nominated? I'd be interested to know what films had a non-white main character. If they aren't being made, then a non-white actor cannot be nominated.

I'm tempted to write it off as sour grapes but it could be institutional racism whereby non-white actors don't get parts and therefore don't get nominated. I could see how that'd be possible. But then that needs to be addressed in a way that doesn't focus on one day and one event so that it's not perceived to be throwing toys out of the pram by the general Oscar watching audience. That, to me, is all boycotting is going to do.
Very good points Rhea, especially .
I'm tempted to write it off as sour grapes but it could be institutional racism whereby non-white actors don't get parts and therefore don't get nominated. I could see how that'd be possible. But then that needs to be addressed in a way that doesn't focus on one day and one event so that it's not perceived to be throwing toys out of the pram by the general Oscar watching audience. That, to me, is all boycotting is going to do.

So I don't see how her boycotting the Academy Awards does anything except draw attention to the issue. Well, maybe that is all she intended to accomplish. But many people will disregard her message b/c they disagree with her methods.

I do see the truth of Kenny's comment that
IMO the problem is not in who gets nominated for awards, it's in who is doing the nominating.
Only members of the Academe of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences can nominate people for awards, and the members are overwhelmingly old white men.
Why?
Only members of the Academe can nominate others to become members of the Academe. Hmmm


However, over time, the world and this country is becoming more diversified, if slowly. Truthfully, all these older members are "gonna die out", and new members who don't espouse the institutional attitudes of racism will take their spots and we will see more ethnicities represented. It's just gonna take time. It's like the people who don't use email will be reduced to zero because they just all pass away...
 

azstonie

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Jada Pinkett Smith and her 1st World Multimillionare Celebrity issues. Gosh, its so *awful.*

The Oscars are outdated and tired, just a cliche at this point. The entire entertainment industry (movies, books and music) has been turned upside down due to the internet/streaming/new devices to download *content.* The movie industry is even worse than the music business in terms of changing with the times.

Maybe Jada could channel all that righteous indignation into an effort that would benefit somebody other than herself and other overprivileged/overpaid/overadored crybabies? Look at what Andre Agassi did in Las Vegas with his school. Apparently that keeps him a little too busy to complain about his lot in life :lol:

(I don't buy the argument that winning an Oscar lends gravitas and changes the trajectory of an acting career---Hallie Berry prime example.)
 

ame

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telephone89|1453306918|3978585 said:
I don't disagree with their intent and the overall message - but she really gets on my nerves haha.

I do believe that there is still institutional racism alive and well in Hollywood. Aziz Ansari actually discussed it in one of his episodes. Hiring white people to play minorities, or only wanting ethnic people who have stereotypical accents/jobs/etc. That doesn't leave a lot of room for non-whites to get 'regular' leading roles, which means that they get such a small sliver of hope at being nominated.

It does make me sad to think that over the past 2 years this bunch of very influential people thought that NO minorities were good enough for a nomination. Not a single one. (as an actor)
He did a GREAT job covering it, too.
 

telephone89

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ame|1453312770|3978635 said:
telephone89|1453306918|3978585 said:
I don't disagree with their intent and the overall message - but she really gets on my nerves haha.

I do believe that there is still institutional racism alive and well in Hollywood. Aziz Ansari actually discussed it in one of his episodes. Hiring white people to play minorities, or only wanting ethnic people who have stereotypical accents/jobs/etc. That doesn't leave a lot of room for non-whites to get 'regular' leading roles, which means that they get such a small sliver of hope at being nominated.

It does make me sad to think that over the past 2 years this bunch of very influential people thought that NO minorities were good enough for a nomination. Not a single one. (as an actor)
He did a GREAT job covering it, too.
He really did. I didn't find the show particularly funny overall, but he had some really great episodes!
 

partgypsy

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There is a similar uproar for the French comic achievement award at the Angoulême International Comics Festival. None of the nominees (30) were female, and apparently over the history only 1 female has won one of these awards. Whoever wins the award becomes president of the society for next year. So, it just perpetuates. It is true that men dominate comics, but at the same time it appears that there is a kind of "blindness" that women contribute to comics.
https://middleastpost.com/sexism-row-mars-french-comic-award/

As far as Jada Pinkett, no I don't really care if she boycotts the Oscars or not. But at least she got people talking about the subject, right? And bottom-line Oscar noms and wins do translate into more job opportunities, higher pay, higher career recognition, so there is merit to what she is saying. I don't like tokens and quotas, but I think the conversation is good.
 

VRBeauty

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I'm half Chinese. Although I was raised in the Caucasian part of my family, and that's primarily how I identify, I'm also fully aware that when most people look at me it registers as "Asian"

And I see very few people who look like me on television (I don't get to the movies much). Most Asians in television are in supporting roles or highly stereotyped roles. Lucy Liu comes to mind as an exception - she's currently in what I'd consider a co-lead in "Elementary", in a role that isn't race-stereotyped. She's also had lots of awards nominations over the years, though with very few wins.

I worked in a very diverse workplace and to me it's obvious that there should be more roles for "people of color," including Blacks and all flavors of Asians, on the screens. At the same time, I also recognize that most of the power players in my profession were Caucasian - something that is changing, but it's still true for now. And that gets back to the age-old question of whether television or the movies have the power to shape people's aspirations and whether that should be a consideration when projects are developed and cast. Personally, I think "yes" and "yes". There is still institutional racism in this country. The media is contributing to it and can be a part in helping to lessen it.

As to Jada Pinkett Smith's complaint - I don't know much about her and I have no idea what her motivation was in making those comments. I would note that there have been Black winners in major categories - Ida Lupino for one. But Hollywood as a long way to go in casting non-whites in both lead and supporting roles, and the awards are going to seem skewed until that gets addressed.
 

partgypsy

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azstonie|1453312604|3978632 said:
Jada Pinkett Smith and her 1st World Multimillionare Celebrity issues. Gosh, its so *awful.*

The Oscars are outdated and tired, just a cliche at this point. The entire entertainment industry (movies, books and music) has been turned upside down due to the internet/streaming/new devices to download *content.* The movie industry is even worse than the music business in terms of changing with the times.

Maybe Jada could channel all that righteous indignation into an effort that would benefit somebody other than herself and other overprivileged/overpaid/overadored crybabies? Look at what Andre Agassi did in Las Vegas with his school. Apparently that keeps him a little too busy to complain about his lot in life :lol:

(I don't buy the argument that winning an Oscar lends gravitas and changes the trajectory of an acting career---Hallie Berry prime example.)
http://www.businessinsider.com/awards-season-2014-what-do-awards-do-for-your-brand-and-bottom-line-2014-1
 

momhappy

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packrat|1453297349|3978494 said:
At some point everyone needs to acknowledge that not everyone does everything in such a manner that everyone is going to love what everyone does.

At some point everyone needs to acknowledge that not everything is b/c of the color of your skin.
I agree.
There are lots of Hollywood actors/actresses who have been either overshadowed or completely robbed despite their consistently great work - Look at Leo, Johnny Depp, Glenn Close, Amy Adams, Ed harris.....and the list goes on and on. Life's not fair sometimes and the Oscars are no different - sometimes, they're not fair either (for different reasons), but you put on your big girl/big boy pants and move on.
 

partgypsy

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momhappy|1453318466|3978678 said:
packrat|1453297349|3978494 said:
At some point everyone needs to acknowledge that not everyone does everything in such a manner that everyone is going to love what everyone does.

At some point everyone needs to acknowledge that not everything is b/c of the color of your skin.
I agree.
There are lots of Hollywood actors/actresses who have been either overshadowed or completely robbed despite their consistently great work - Look at Leo, Johnny Depp, Glenn Close, Amy Adams, Ed harris.....and the list goes on and on. Life's not fair sometimes and the Oscars are no different - sometimes, they're not fair either (for different reasons), but you put on your big girl/big boy pants and move on.
Uh, seriously? Leo's been nominated for 6 Oscars. Johnny Depp 3, Glenn Close 6. Ed Harris 4, Amy Adams 5 (what?). How is that being snubbed? I feel that actually winning a nom is a bit of a crapshoot (depends on the competition) but you examples show the exact opposite of what you intended, that there is underrepresentation not only in getting in the movie in the first place, in getting nominated, let alone winning.

I think television is a little bit ahead of the curve compared to the movie industry, which is behind.

I do think there is a bit of a whine as her husband was in the running for a nomination and didn't get it, but it doesn't invalidate her point.
 

Jambalaya

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I haven't read all the responses, just chiming in. I think the point in the article about movies starring people of color not being made is the key. Sure, perhaps there was no one talented enough to be Oscar-nominated this year or last year who also happened to be a person of color. But that's because most mainstream movies star white actors. There aren't enough high-quality roles for people of color. Heck, there aren't enough quality roles for women. There have been a number of protests from major Hollywood female stars over the last few years that juicy roles for talented female stars are thin on the ground. Of course, most mainstream movies star women, but the same can't be said for actors of color.

If there were more roles for actors of color, there'd be more awards for actors of color.

I agree that there is something wrong with the system. Hollywood is so white and male stars get paid much more than female stars.

That Hollywood is racist and sexist doesn't surprise me at all. But I think the Oscars are a symptom, not a cause.
 

Jambalaya

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Viola Davis has won a number of awards, including an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress and she was nominated for Best Actress. Gabourey Sidibe was nominated for a Best Actress Oscar, and Halle Berry won a Best Actress Oscar in 2002. It's worth remembering that although Kate Winslet eventually won an Oscar, she holds the record for being the youngest person to receive six Oscar nominations without winning, and Leonardo DiCaprio has never won one, despite being a major star. I don't think the people handing out the gongs are at fault. I just don't think there are enough Oscar-calibre roles in Hollywood for people of color, and that's the problem.

On this topic, does anyone watch the cop show Blue Bloods with Tom Selleck and Bridget Moynahan? Man, is that show racist! The perps are always people of color, without fail.
 

kenny

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America is not North Korea in that there's no central committee controlling films to ensure they follow the party line and train society in a 'correct' way to be.

The movie industry is a for-profit business.
Hollywood producers want to produce films they believe will make the most money so perhaps they think the majority is their key demographic.

Perhaps they think the status quo will maximize attendance.
Perhaps they are right.
After all, even though Caucasians are shrinking in numbers it's still the largest group.

I'm not defending or attacking it.
Just pointing out this follow-the-money elephant in the room.
 

momhappy

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part gypsy|1453319927|3978684 said:
momhappy|1453318466|3978678 said:
packrat|1453297349|3978494 said:
At some point everyone needs to acknowledge that not everyone does everything in such a manner that everyone is going to love what everyone does.

At some point everyone needs to acknowledge that not everything is b/c of the color of your skin.
I agree.
There are lots of Hollywood actors/actresses who have been either overshadowed or completely robbed despite their consistently great work - Look at Leo, Johnny Depp, Glenn Close, Amy Adams, Ed harris.....and the list goes on and on. Life's not fair sometimes and the Oscars are no different - sometimes, they're not fair either (for different reasons), but you put on your big girl/big boy pants and move on.
Uh, seriously? Leo's been nominated for 6 Oscars. Johnny Depp 3, Glenn Close 6. Ed Harris 4, Amy Adams 5 (what?). How is that being snubbed? I feel that actually winning a nom is a bit of a crapshoot (depends on the competition) but you examples show the exact opposite of what you intended, that there is underrepresentation not only in getting in the movie in the first place, in getting nominated, let alone winning.

I think television is a little bit ahead of the curve compared to the movie industry, which is behind.

I do think there is a bit of a whine as her husband was in the running for a nomination and didn't get it, but it doesn't invalidate her point.
I wasn't referring to nominations - I was referring to Oscar wins. The point of my post was that sometimes there seems to be no rhyme of reason when it comes to winning an Oscar - it's not notorious for being particularly "fair"
 

ruby59

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Just my opinion, of course, but I saw "Concussion" with Will Smith. And I feel he was over looked in not being nominated.
 

Bayek

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For one, I think the Oscars are past their day. I feel media is in a transition and things are fragmenting in the movie industry.. that said the voting age of the academy of movie stars ;-) is probably 50 and besides acting ability perhaps the content just doesn't appeal to a voter.. is the fact that no black men or women were nominated mean the academy is racist? I don't think so, I think appeal and age are at work here. I personally have not seen one of the nominated movies, I wait for Red Box, not because of the money so much as the experience of movie theaters pretty much sucks today, they too seem a relic of the 20th century... just my opinion.
 

Bayek

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Tom Selleck is a noted right winger. I would never watch one of his shows.
 

marymm

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I am totally okay with Spike Lee's and Jada Pinkett Smith's boycott of the Oscars... their position on this issue is valid in my eyes, and I tend to respect those who engage in peaceful protest.

On another note, I really only know Tom Selleck through his roles in Magnum P.I., the Jesse Stone films, and Blue Bloods -- and I am a fan of all of these shows.
 

missy

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Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I haven't seen any of the nominated movies or any of the current movies in fact so I don't have any opinion as to the nominations. There are a lot of good points everyone has brought up and I do wonder if the committee who makes the nominations sees every movie and are they all white middle aged men because yes that would make a difference in what their preferences are IMO.

Of course there are more roles for white men then men or women of color in Hollywood and much of that goes to what the demand is i.e. what viewers want to see so like it or not that makes sense. As Kenny pointed out it is a for profit business. And if more of the roles are going to white men it just goes to less chance of a minority being nominated or winning. As someone pointed out women still make less in Hollywood (and almost everywhere for that matter...not just in Hollywood) than men do so yes inequality is still alive and well everywhere IMO.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/natalierobehmed/2015/10/13/jennifer-lawrence-speaks-out-on-making-less-than-male-co-stars/#2715e4857a0bd6c705e70953

co-stars (Photo credit: Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

Jennifer Lawrence, the world’s highest-paid actress, banked $52 million last year–$28 million less than the world’s highest-paid actor, Robert Downey Jr. While neither are low on dough, Lawrence has been short-changed in comparison to her male co-stars–and she is finally speaking out about it.

In an essay published on today’s edition of Lenny, the newsletter from Lena Dunham and Girls producer Jenni Konner, Lawrence discusses the difference in her pay from that of her American Hustle male co-stars, which was leaked during the Sony hack.

“When the Sony hack happened and I found out how much less I was being paid than the lucky people with dicks, I didn’t get mad at Sony,” writes Lawrence. “I got mad at myself.”

The leaked Sony correspondence relayed Lawrence’s representatives complaining that male actors (Bradley Cooper, Christian Bale and Jeremy Renner) received a 9% cut of profits, while Lawrence and Amy Adams pocketed just 7%.

“I failed as a negotiator because I gave up early,” Lawrence recalls of the 2013 movie. “I didn’t want to keep fighting over millions of dollars that, frankly, due to two franchises, I don’t need.”

Lawrence, who was just one of 16 women on the Global Celebrity 100 list of world’s highest-earning entertainers, recognizes that her million-dollar-paygap is very different to the problems facing most women. She writes: “It’s hard for me to speak about my experience as a working woman because I can safely say my problems aren’t exactly relatable.”

Gwyneth Paltrow (No. 12th on our list of highest-paid actresses) echoed the difficulties in discussing top-tier pay disparities, telling Reuters that Hollywood women have been criticized for speaking out. “You were considered ungrateful, you were considered entitled, so I think it’s amazing that women now are saying ‘we’re going to talk about this. This isn’t fair,’” she said.

Paltrow and Lawrence join a growing chorus acknowledging unequal pay in Hollywood. While top actresses can earn between $10 million to $20 million a film with the option to negotiate a share of the movie’s profits, the opportunities for top remuneration are far less frequent than for men. Lawrence’s Hunger Games is one of few major movies with a woman as its main character. In fact, a recent study found that just 21 of the 100 top-grossing films of 2014 featured a female lead or co-lead, while only 28.1% of characters in 100 top-grossing films were female, period. This means it’s much rarer for women to get the sort of blockbuster role which would warrant the massive backend deals many male counterparts demand (Tom Cruise in Mission: Impossible or Robert Downey Jr. in Iron Man, for example).

Why There Are So Few Women On The Global Celebrity 100 List

Though Hollywood’s women are still well remunerated, it’s on a scale far smaller than their male colleagues. The World’s 18 Highest-Paid Actresses earned a combined $281 million before taxes and fees–$660 million less than the 34 World’s Highest-Paid Actors, who banked a cumulative $941 million. Only four actresses made north of $20 million, while 21 actors banked $20 million-plus.

In the U.S., Tinseltown’s pay gap is persistent industry-wide in salaries of all scales. On average, white women get paid 78 cents to every dollar a white man makes, while Hispanic women earn 56 cents to a white male’s dollar, Black women 64 cents and Native American women just 59 cents to that.

As Lawrence notes, women negotiating for higher pay worry about seeming ”difficult” or “spoiled.” Lawrence says her desire to “be liked” prevented her from arguing her profit cut, “until I saw the payroll on the Internet and realized every man I was working with definitely didn’t worry about being “difficult” or “spoiled.”

Yet she says when she expressed an opinion bluntly and directly, as a man might, she was perceived as offensive.

“I’m over trying to find the “adorable” way to state my opinion and still be likable!” Lawrence writes. “I don’t think I’ve ever worked for a man in charge who spent time contemplating what angle he should use to have his voice heard. It’s just heard.”

So what can be done to amplify all women’s voices–not just those belonging to wealthy, white actresses? Well, discussing the paygap as Lawrence has is a start. But more hyper-wealthy women need to come out and own their success in order to further the conversation–and inspire everyday women to strive for financial fortitude.

For the record, all of the top-earning female actresses on the Global Celebrity 100 list declined to be featured for FORBES magazine’s 6 million readers in a way that would discuss their triumphs—perhaps because they “feel like it’s flaunting or flashy,” as cover-subject Katy Perry suggested.

Perry cited FORBES’ recent cover story on Honest Company’s Jessica Alba as inspiration to appear on the cover herself. “You have a perception of her as this actress that does these types of films, but now you see her on the cover of Forbes… it’s really like a mark [that] you have made it,” Perry said.

It has taken Lawrence nearly a year to speak out about unfair pay, but here’s hoping she continues to do so.

“When it comes to the subject of feminism, I’ve remained ever-so-slightly quiet,” wrote Lawrence. Not anymore.
And

http://www.triplepundit.com/2015/06/jane-fonda-lily-tomlin-get-short-shrift-netflix/

Legendary actresses Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin, stars of the Netflix original Grace and Frankie, are facing some good old fashioned wage inequality. Despite the fact that their characters take the lead in name and screen time, they are paid less than the male actors (Martin Sheen and Sam Waterson) who star in the show.

Fonda and Tomlin lead the show in a story of an unusual friendship between the classy yet stuck-up Grace and airy, hippie Frankie – two women thrust together because their husbands fall in love.

While Sheen and Waterson are instrumental in the development of the plot, it’s clear Fonda and Tomlin dominate the story and absolutely carry the show. Fonda and Tomlin’s portrayals of their distinct and polarizing characters are something of a comedic genius. But they aren’t recognized rightly for it.

“That doesn’t make us happy,” Fonda said at a recent Netflix press event after finding out Sheen and Waterson make more money.

“No. The show is not ‘Sol and Robert,” Tomlin chimed in. “It’s ‘Grace and Frankie.’”

The fans aren’t responding lightly either, creating a petition for pay equality within the show. The petition’s goal is to garnish enough signatures and support that Netflix pays its stars what they deserve.

In 1980, Fonda and Tomlin co-starred alongside Dolly Parton in a comedy Nine to Five, illuminating sexism and bigotry in the workplace. Fast-forward 35 years, and the duo’s new project is still, ironically, falling short to equalize the pay for both the lead male characters and the lead female characters.

This isn’t the first time Hollywood is making headlines for not distributing equal pay to their top moneymakers. The emails released in the Sony hack, revealed that big-time actresses Jennifer Lawrence and Amy Adams were shortchanged in comparison to their male co-stars in the critically acclaimed film, “American Hustle.”

The petition for Grace and Frankie highlights the success that can come in speaking out by referencing Charlize Theron, who discovered she was making a whopping $10 million less than her co-star in “The Huntsman” and successfully challenged the moviemakers.

According to Forbes’ list of highest paid actors and actresses in Hollywood, the numbers aren’t even in the same ballpark. Angelina Jolie, the top-paid actress in 2013, raked in $33 million but that high number ties her for tenth on the list of highest paid actors. Among the list, men earn a collective $465 million between the top 10 while women pocket $181 million alltogether. Robert Downey Jr., Channing Tatum and Hugh Jackman’s total earnings in 2013 account for more than the top 10 women combined.

Just 12 percent of 2014’s top-grossing movies featured women protagonists, a four percent decline since 2002. Despite this low number, statistics may suggest having a woman play the lead role can be more cost-effective for moviemakers. In 2013, movies revolving around female characters made an average of $127 million while male-centered films made $95 million per movie.

The problem of pay inequality extends well beyond Hollywood. Women make less than men in nearly every job, according to a more than 500 occupations observed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Throughout her career, a woman will lose more than $430,000, enough to feed a family of four for 37 years, because of wage inequality. The gender gap is shrinking thanks to an increasing minimum wage state to state.

While Fonda and Tomlin likely won’t run out of food to eat because of these pay disparities, Grace and Frankie give us a good reason to see gender pay inequality in action.
I don't feel sorry for Jada Pinkett Smith or Jennifer Lawrence or Gwyneth Paltrow or any of the rich actors but rather am concerned about the inequality that still exists for all people whether it be due to color, gender, religion, sexual preference, sexual identity, etc. We still have a long way to go in terms of making it fair for everyone but we have come a long way too. Are we going fast enough? No I don't think so.
 
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