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Prince Dead at 57

chrono

Super_Ideal_Rock
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Apr 22, 2004
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I just saw this in the canteen TV. Very sad to see it. A great music artist and performer.
 

monarch64

Super_Ideal_Rock
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I am in shock. I have had tears in my eyes for the last half an hour since I read the news. ;(

Lots of memories of this great artist's music, videos, movies, and performances wrapped up in my childhood.
 

CJ2008

Ideal_Rock
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Dec 31, 2006
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:(sad

Doris Roberts just passed away too (I know her mostly from Everybody Loves Raymond).

:(sad
 

septembergirl

Shiny_Rock
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Jun 12, 2008
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I kind of still feel like I am in disbelief. I love his music and I don't want this to be true :((
 

PintoBean

Ideal_Rock
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WHY?!?! This is so shocking ;( He's so young!
 

Bonfire

Ideal_Rock
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Feb 22, 2014
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Sad day :(( wasn't he just in the news a couple of days ago? His plane had to make an emergency landing in the Quad Cities because he wasn't feeling well after playing in Atlanta? What an icon. "When Doves Cry" ;( ;( RIP Prince.
 

stracci2000

Ideal_Rock
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A friend went to see him in concert back in 1980.
She said he wore only a gold lame bikini bottom. And she said he was fabulous!
 

monarch64

Super_Ideal_Rock
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stracci2000|1461275375|4022196 said:
A friend went to see him in concert back in 1980.
She said he wore only a gold lame bikini bottom. And she said he was fabulous!
Seen on Twitter: "Prince will steal your girl, then steal her clothes, then steal someone else's girl in your girl's clothes.

The man could dress. I will never forget his buttless outfit from the VMAs many "moons" ago.
 

momhappy

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And remember his protege' Vanity? She died this year too at the same age (57).
I am so very saddened by the loss of Prince. It feels like my beloved 80's are slowly slipping away from me :blackeye:
I was lucky enough to see Prince in concert a few years ago - it was one of the best shows I've ever seen. He was a great musician and a hell of a guitar player. RIP.
 

Jambalaya

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3,548
Poor Prince! And he just had a new purple piano and a new purple guitar (that he'd been generously sharing with others).

He was still enjoying life.

Those last pictures of him are so poignant - one in a Walgreens parking lot of him walking toward his car, taken just a few hours before he died. I'll never understand the human body, because I just don't understand how someone can be on their feet, up, dressed, walking around, talking, and then just....dead, a very short while after.

Poor guy. It's very sad.
 

canuk-gal

Super_Ideal_Rock
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20,549
HI:

Both my DH and I loved his music and respected his immense talent. In fact, the wallpaper my DH has on his phone is the selfie of us at Princes' last concert here!

My favorite song? Difficult to pick just one...but I happily groove to "I would Die For You"...

cheers--Sharon
 

azstonie

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Jambalaya|1461431979|4022799 said:
Poor Prince! And he just had a new purple piano and a new purple guitar (that he'd been generously sharing with others).

He was still enjoying life.

Those last pictures of him are so poignant - one in a Walgreens parking lot of him walking toward his car, taken just a few hours before he died. I'll never understand the human body, because I just don't understand how someone can be on their feet, up, dressed, walking around, talking, and then just....dead, a very short while after.

Poor guy. It's very sad.
This can happen with ARDS ( Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome). I've seen patients die very quickly from necrotizing fasciitis. Then there is sudden cardiac death syndrome.

I loved Prince and his lyrics, compositions and performances. He also had grit, people forget when he opened for The Rolling Stones, the audience threw garbage at him and booed him off the stage.

He earned every success he had. I'm so sorry he's gone.
 

momhappy

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Autopsy results are in. Toxicology reports revealed that the cause of death was a drug overdose (fentanyl). :(sad
 

Tacori E-ring

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Opiate overdoses are a major problem. I don't see an end in sight. Very sad.
 

House Cat

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Tacori E-ring|1464914229|4039597 said:
Opiate overdoses are a major problem. I don't see an end in sight. Very sad.
This frustrates me to my core. Why the sudden influx of opiate addictions? What is going on? Why are doctors prescribing these meds so much? Why are they flooding the streets?

I watched a documentary called Oxycontin Express. It's about the pain clinics in Florida. These places were pretty much like the pot dispensaries in California. What I am trying to say is, both are complete jokes. You don't have to have a real illness of any kind to receive a card that enables you to then receive your prescriptions. People were coming from several states over to get large amounts of opiates from these pain clinics because they were unable to feed their addictions any other way. People are dying left and right in Florida because of these clinics and everyone of any importance knows about it. They do nothing.

This leads me to believe that money is being made and people are being paid off.


I am so sad that opiate addiction took Prince. It is as if that fact doesn't even compute. So many of his songs spoke out against addiction. I think of how difficult it must have been for him to live that lie. It sounds as though the last days of his life were filled with extreme desperation. My heart is broken for him.

Prince is my ultimate favorite. A lot of people have said this and it is true for me too, his music has run through my life like a soundtrack. When I was 9 years old, I fell in love with the sounds of the Purple Rain album. I played it every night when I fell asleep. My best friend and I listened to 1999 constantly as we got ready for dances at the local community center or while practicing make-up. Under the Cherry Moon would play while another friend and I learned to paint. I have converted many friends into diehard Prince fans because I would jump into their cars and pop in his latest CD. His music is so funky that you have to sing and dance in the car. Every boyfriend was converted into a fan. All of my children and I have had dance parties to his music in the house...it was our thing. His concerts were epic, but everyone knows that. I can't say enough about his music or him.. I won't even try.

The moment I was told he was dead, a pain shot through my heart. My daughter texted me and said she was hiding at her desk at work, very sad. She was remembering our dance parties. I received many condolences texts. I was hit so hard by his death. I felt like a crazy person. I am NOT the kind of person who cares about Hollywood or the Kardashians or anything like that, but Prince, he was something different. My heart was reeling.

The weekend after his death, my husband and I were celebrating our anniversary. We had a beautiful hotel room for two nights in town. I wasn't feeling well and we were planning on staying in for the first night. We heard a bunch of noise coming from the street. I thought people were fighting, but I was wrong. My husband opened the window to find that at the park across the street, they were having a farewell dance party for Prince. Well, I didn't care how I was feeling, I jumped up, threw on my clothes and makeup and we went downstairs and danced our hearts out. It was a great night. The last song was, of course, Purple Rain. This will sound cheesy, but it actually rained during that song..just a little when there was no rain forecasted for the night. Cute!

In honor of Prince, the city lit the buildings purple, bars served Purple "Reign" martinis, and most everything was Prince themed. It was good for me to have that weekend to say goodbye to Prince.
 

momhappy

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Mar 3, 2013
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^I was pretty upset over his death too. It's an odd feeling to grieve someone you never knew.... I was really hoping that his death would't be drug-related even though I suspected it was. I don't think it takes away from his greatness because we all have our demons to battle, but I had hoped that he could somehow rise above it. I read that he was probably in horrible pain after years of dancing on stage in heels, but I wonder what sort of internal struggles he endured (with the loss of two babies - one shortly after birth and then a miscarriage) :blackeye:
 

gemgirl

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Tacori E-ring|1464914229|4039597 said:
Opiate overdoses are a major problem. I don't see an end in sight. Very sad.
Fentanyl is a horribly dangerous, strong drug usually reserved for terminal cancer pain. I honestly can't imagine what his doctor was thinking.
 

gemgirl

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Prince's death will be for me, one of those things I will remember for the rest of my life because I was at IDJ talking with Yekutiel when the news flashed across the flat screen TV behind my head. Yekutiel just stopped talking and stared at the screen and said "look". Just like the JFK shooting, the Bobby Kennedy shooting, the Dr. King shooting, Princess Di's car accident, 9-11, Michael Jackson's death and other monumentous events, I will never forget where I was when I heard the news. My heart just sank like a stone and the world got oddly silent for a brief moment and all I heard were the thoughts in my head. Sad, sad, shocked thoughts.
 

House Cat

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gemgirl|1465210504|4040711 said:
Tacori E-ring|1464914229|4039597 said:
Opiate overdoses are a major problem. I don't see an end in sight. Very sad.
Fentanyl is a horribly dangerous, strong drug usually reserved for terminal cancer pain. I honestly can't imagine what his doctor was thinking.
This is what I know to be true too.

I think they are still investigating whether or not the Fentanyl was prescribed or obtained illegally.
 

BeekeeperBetty

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My husband is in a specialty where they liberally prescribe narcotics. I don't want to go in to too much detail because there aren't a lot of doctors who do what he does, so it could potentially lead to an invasion of privacy. It would be too easy to find us and the Pentagon has been explicit that we need to be careful about PERSEC because of ISIS. Sorry for being vague.

Anyway, the stats on people getting addicted to narcotics when prescribed for pain are pretty low. I guess I should say there's a difference between physiological addiction that people with chronic pain experience and psychological addiction, which is what we typically think of as addicts. People who are given pain meds who are actually in pain have a very different experience than people who take them who are not in pain, and that typically does not lead to psychological addiction. It's becoming a thing to blame doctors for opiod addictions, but the flip side of the coin is allowing people to suffer needlessly. My husband says that is akin to torture and that is not something that he will stand for in his patients. His patients are critically ill, and during their sometimes lengthy stay in the hospital they become physiologically addicted to narcotics, but they are slowly weaned off before discharge, and it seems as though they do not go on to have life-long narcotic addictions. I fear that the anti-narcotic sentiment is going to get us back to where we were in the 80's where people dying of cancer were refused pain meds because they might become addicted and died in terrible agony. My husband has often gone on rants about how the US has such a Puritanical view of narcotics, and how anything that makes people feel good must automatically be bad. I've also heard some ramblings about the narcotics act of 1914 and how essentially the alcohol lobby was better funded and strongly encouraged the ban on narcotics because it was cutting in to the sale of alcohol too much. Alcohol is also very dangerous, but in America we're fine with booze and upset about giving narcotics to patients who are in pain. It's a weird cultural dichotomy. Perhaps we need to fund more research on addiction, and find out why certain people seem to need various drugs to survive. It appears to me they are self medicating for a mental illness, but what, why, and how can we safely treat it?

I'm not sure what the circumstances of Prince's death were specifically. He suffered from chronic hip and knee pain, and it sounds as though he was legally prescribed narcotics for the pain. I don't know why it ended up being lethal. Perhaps he forgot how much he had previously taken and took too much. We don't really know. But this doesn't sound similar to Kurt Cobain, for instance, who was taking illegal drugs.

How do we decide who is in pain enough to deserve pain meds? Who makes the decisions about what level of pain and suffering is to be ignored, and what is to be treated? What does it really matter if people who are terminally ill or have chronic pain conditions are functioning addicts of legally prescribed medications? Many people are on narcotics long term and when closely monitored by a physician these drugs are safe and effective. Also remember that chronic untreated pain actually causes changes in people's brains, and that can be a major issue for these people and their quality of life. Sure, some physicians are basically pill mills and pay back their enormous student loans by shilling drugs (or by selling vaccine exemptions, which is pretty lucrative in California right now), but the vast majority of doctors are simply trying to do the best by their patients, and sometimes that means pain medications. It's a complicated issue and there is no one answer, we need to find the middle ground between giving pain meds to everyone or refusing to give them to anyone, but I'm afraid in the US this is something that cannot happen.
 

wildcat03

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Apr 11, 2011
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BeekeeperBetty|1465235917|4040801 said:
My husband is in a specialty where they liberally prescribe narcotics. I don't want to go in to too much detail because there aren't a lot of doctors who do what he does, so it could potentially lead to an invasion of privacy. It would be too easy to find us and the Pentagon has been explicit that we need to be careful about PERSEC because of ISIS. Sorry for being vague.

Anyway, the stats on people getting addicted to narcotics when prescribed for pain are pretty low. I guess I should say there's a difference between physiological addiction that people with chronic pain experience and psychological addiction, which is what we typically think of as addicts. People who are given pain meds who are actually in pain have a very different experience than people who take them who are not in pain, and that typically does not lead to psychological addiction. It's becoming a thing to blame doctors for opiod addictions, but the flip side of the coin is allowing people to suffer needlessly. My husband says that is akin to torture and that is not something that he will stand for in his patients. His patients are critically ill, and during their sometimes lengthy stay in the hospital they become physiologically addicted to narcotics, but they are slowly weaned off before discharge, and it seems as though they do not go on to have life-long narcotic addictions. I fear that the anti-narcotic sentiment is going to get us back to where we were in the 80's where people dying of cancer were refused pain meds because they might become addicted and died in terrible agony. My husband has often gone on rants about how the US has such a Puritanical view of narcotics, and how anything that makes people feel good must automatically be bad. I've also heard some ramblings about the narcotics act of 1914 and how essentially the alcohol lobby was better funded and strongly encouraged the ban on narcotics because it was cutting in to the sale of alcohol too much. Alcohol is also very dangerous, but in America we're fine with booze and upset about giving narcotics to patients who are in pain. It's a weird cultural dichotomy. Perhaps we need to fund more research on addiction, and find out why certain people seem to need various drugs to survive. It appears to me they are self medicating for a mental illness, but what, why, and how can we safely treat it?
I disagree pretty strongly. Some patients are weaned off narcotics before discharge, but many aren't. I work in an inner city ER, so I pretty much see it all. There have been days where literally half of my patients were their either seeking narcotics or as a result of narcotic abuse. I do think that alcohol is just as dangerous, and it's probably the same population that is susceptible to alcohol abuse and dependence as is susceptible to narcotic abuse/dependence. I've seen countless patients whose narcotic prescriptions are no longer being written by their surgeon, so they come to the ER, go to urgent cares, etc. in attempts to obtain them. Maybe they still have real pain - but their surgeons don't seem to think they do/should any more. I have no issue with narcotics for acute pain, but think that the Joint Commission with it's "Pain as a Fifth Vital Sign" has led to narcotics being used just to make a hospital or doctor's numbers better, rather than using them wisely and when indicated for acute injuries for a limited period of time.

To be honest, the US is FAR less restrictive re: narcotics than almost all of Europe. The same surgeries that get prescriptions for Dilaudid in the US (far more powerful than even morphine) get ibuprofen in Europe.
 

House Cat

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I disagree too.

I have had too many incidents (some very extreme) where doctors wanted to prescribe opiates and other addictive meds rather than give me real treatment. Pills are an easy, cheap form of treatment, especially for HMO's. You have to pull teeth for physical therapy, acupuncture, real therapy.


Terminal patients are a whole different ballgame. I don't think anyone is debating this subject.


I have seen many people with "chronic pain" who were blitzed out of their mind on their meds. Their quality of life has faded. They couldn't even keep their thoughts straight. The problem is that docs are so overwhelmed by the fact that they have to keep such a huge number of patients that it is impossible for them to properly monitor their pain patients.

Prescription meds just became the number one cause of overdose in the nation. I'm not seeing where anyone is being overly conservative about them.
 
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