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Cehrabehra

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I know there are tons of docs and docs-to-be here so I thought it''d be a good place to ask this...

I''m looking for a new doctor and have gone to my ins. website and done a search and there''s like 300 names that come up. How do you choose one?? In the past (think young lol) I chose docs by their name... but it seems prudent to use REAL criteria now. Is there a website you can go to to get more info on the docs? Is there an affiliation I should be looking for, questions I should ask when I call their offices? Red flags?

I know what an internist is, but what''s the dif between general practice and family practice? Is there a quiz somewhere you can take to narrow down the options so you at least know what you''re looking for LOL I''m gonna have to resort to what names I like again if I can''t find another way LOL Word of mouth is out.
 

chrono

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Sometimes, I prefer a female or male doctor, so that cuts the list down a little.
Then, I go by years of experience in a particular field.
Also, sometimes I pick by certification (by certain field/board)

I know it doesn''t help much. Or, I''ll see a few of the doctors in the same practise, then stick with the one I feel most comfortable with. This try/trial method takes longer but this way, I get a chance to meet the doctor and know if our "styles" mesh.
 

movie zombie

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for some reason i like knowing where s/he interned. palo alto medical foundation gives that information also.

movie zombie
 

turtledazzle

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Cehra ~

I always check the Licensure Verification for any doctor. In my state, there is a link on the webpage for the Department of Health. From there you can see where they got their degree, where they interned, how long they''ve been practicing, and if there are any disciplinary actions, etc. that have been filed against them (though sometimes I wonder how complete, accurate, up-to-date those records are). Mostly I like to see where they got their education and how long they''ve been practicing.

Here is the link for Licensure Verification for my state (but you can search for any state, though there is probably a more state-appropriate link for you): http://www2.tennessee.gov/health/licensure/index.htm

As for general practice versus family practice, I''ve also often wondered but never searched. According to wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_practitioner
"In the United States, a general practitioner has completed the one-year internship required to obtain a medical license, after having received at least an undergraduate Baccalaureate degree and a four-year Doctor of Medicine or a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree. A family medicine physician (also known as a family practitioner), however, has completed a three-year family medicine residency in addition to the undergraduate and doctoral studies, and is eligible for the board certification now required by most hospitals and health plans."
 

Cehrabehra

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Date: 1/23/2007 12:16:43 PM
Author: Chrono
Sometimes, I prefer a female or male doctor, so that cuts the list down a little.
Then, I go by years of experience in a particular field.
Also, sometimes I pick by certification (by certain field/board)

I know it doesn''t help much. Or, I''ll see a few of the doctors in the same practise, then stick with the one I feel most comfortable with. This try/trial method takes longer but this way, I get a chance to meet the doctor and know if our ''styles'' mesh.
I tend to like men better but the last few male docs I''ve had have been so.... I dunno, women are warmer sometimes and I think I want a woman again... I''ve not had a woman for a long time. I''ve not had a group practice for a long time. My doc is semi-alternative but he''s too soft spoken (I can''t hear him well) and always makes me feel horribly guilty to the ponit where I avoid him :/
 

Cehrabehra

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Date: 1/23/2007 12:54:54 PM
Author: turtledazzle

Cehra ~

I always check the Licensure Verification for any doctor. In my state, there is a link on the webpage for the Department of Health. From there you can see where they got their degree, where they interned, how long they''ve been practicing, and if there are any disciplinary actions, etc. that have been filed against them (though sometimes I wonder how complete, accurate, up-to-date those records are). Mostly I like to see where they got their education and how long they''ve been practicing.

Here is the link for Licensure Verification for my state (but you can search for any state, though there is probably a more state-appropriate link for you): http://www2.tennessee.gov/health/licensure/index.htm

As for general practice versus family practice, I''ve also often wondered but never searched. According to wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_practitioner
''In the United States, a general practitioner has completed the one-year internship required to obtain a medical license, after having received at least an undergraduate Baccalaureate degree and a four-year Doctor of Medicine or a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree. A family medicine physician (also known as a family practitioner), however, has completed a three-year family medicine residency in addition to the undergraduate and doctoral studies, and is eligible for the board certification now required by most hospitals and health plans.''

thanks turdleD! I searched "licensure verification doctor oregon" and got a state board database which provides some info which is good to weed out bad ones, but nothing very exciting LOL

Ultimately it''s all about the name, isn''t it? LOL I wish they included some stuff about bedside manner LOL or at least philosophy of health!
 

:)

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Cehra - is there someone you can ask for a reference? I find that is truly the best way (yes, checking for a real license is a good idea too LOL!). There is more than just reading a book to being a physician 'the art of medicine' as they call it - human touch and interaction play a big role, I think. I remember once I was having trouble with my eyes, my dad (who is a physician) sent me to an eye doc - they saw me same day and everything, but I thought he was terrible. I think that was because he was completely abrupt and had no bedside manner and I left there having no idea what was going on. When my dad asked how the visit went, I told him how bad I thought the doctor was and my dad was shocked - this guy turned out to be a really well published academic type of guy - really smart, actually well known and respected, but I had him send me to someone else that was friendlier and explained things the next time!!!


ETA: GP and FP are synonymous.

Edited again - oh, sorry - I just reread your post to see that word of mouth is out. Is there a major academic center near you?
 

longtimelurker

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Hi Cehra,

I have asked my kid''s pediatrician for a couple of names for a GP for me. And other moms (I know you said word of mouth is out, though). Or what about from your ob/gyn? hmm, maybe even your dentist? Just saying that b/c mine is in a large medical tower and may have some insight.


I tend to pick men, not because I like them better or don''t like women, but my logic has been "if every woman I know only wants to see a woman, that means equally good male doctors will have more openings in their practice
" So the scheduling will be easier, and convenience is a large selling point. That would take your list down to around 150, right?

All doctors around me seem to be in fairly large practices, so I haven''t been afraid to switch within a practice if I see one that fits my needs better.
 

Ellen

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Cehra, why is word of mouth out?
 

Regular Guy

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Consider checking with your helpful librarian. If some sort of recommendation type data is available in your locale, I''ll bet the reference librarian at any reasonably staffed public library will have this right behind his or her desk to give you.

Here in DC, I''ve gone to both Washingtonian for their best doctors issue, and likewise, Washington Checkbook. Years ago I''d found another source, but I forget what it is.

However...looking for my wife recently...I found doctors on those lists were not taking new patients...and based on her wanting a woman doctor, I left her with a choice of 4 docs, who were in the neighborhood, for her to check...based solely on the plan literature, same as you''ve used.
 

Cehrabehra

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Date: 1/23/2007 4:24:22 PM
Author: Ellen
Cehra, why is word of mouth out?
Because I''ve asked everyone I know already and no one is thrilled with their doctors LOL When I asked for a ped 3 out of 4 people gave me the same name so it was easy.... and we''ve had her for almost 8 years now. I''m considering switching her now though but our next door neighbor his a local ped and I would be happy to use him. Maybe I should ask him for a recommendation... hmmmm..... For the time being i''m going to stay where I am but I am planning to change. I have to get more even before I consider changing... I haven''t been taking care of myself and my sugars are through the roof!!
 

Cehrabehra

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Date: 1/23/2007 4:17:06 PM
Author: ltl
Hi Cehra,

I have asked my kid''s pediatrician for a couple of names for a GP for me. And other moms (I know you said word of mouth is out, though). Or what about from your ob/gyn? hmm, maybe even your dentist? Just saying that b/c mine is in a large medical tower and may have some insight.


I tend to pick men, not because I like them better or don''t like women, but my logic has been ''if every woman I know only wants to see a woman, that means equally good male doctors will have more openings in their practice
'' So the scheduling will be easier, and convenience is a large selling point. That would take your list down to around 150, right?

All doctors around me seem to be in fairly large practices, so I haven''t been afraid to switch within a practice if I see one that fits my needs better.
LOL on the asking a ped thing... that''s my next move as per last post lol I don''t have an ob/gyn at the moment... I had a midwife I used to use but I also had a perinatologist and he didn''t see non-pregnant women.... the midwife nurse prac did but she had THE SMALLEST hands in the world and we''ll just say her exams were uncomfortable so I''ve had my reg docs do those exams the past several years.
 

Ellen

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Date: 1/23/2007 6:39:21 PM
Author: Cehrabehra

Date: 1/23/2007 4:24:22 PM
Author: Ellen
Cehra, why is word of mouth out?
Because I''ve asked everyone I know already and no one is thrilled with their doctors LOL
Oh.
 

codex57

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I still say ask for recommendations. Yes, you might find a ton of people who don't like their docs. That's cuz a lot of docs are out there who don't know anything.

I went to about 4 or 5 docs for a knee problem I had when I was younger. General med, specialists, etc. All were idiots. Finally stumbled upon some doc that actually knew what he was doing. My mom only found out about him from asking people and getting recommendations (most of the previous docs were local docs). I wish I wasn't so young back then and had known to grab a card or something cuz I'd recommend that guy all over the place if I could.

That incident is the main reason I avoid doctors if at all possible. Met too many who, while smart, don't know anything beyond throwing antibiotics at a cough or cold (which just ruins the effectiveness of that antibiotic).

Still, that one good doc came from word of mouth.
 

HOUMedGal

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Just to help clarify the semantics:

General Practitioner: one who has completed 4 years of med school and an internship (one year) to obtain liscensure. Has NOT completed a residency.

General Internal Medicine doc: 4 years of med school plus 3 year residency in Internal Medicine. Takes care of all adult (usually 18+) problems except for the female ones (think things you would go to the OB/GYN for). Does not do pediatrics.

Family Medicine doc: 4 years of med school plus a 3 year residency in Family Medicine. Takes care of everything, from kids to adults to elderly folks to pregnant ladies.


I''m a little biased (as I''m planning on starting a Family Medicine residency in 1.5 years) but I think a Family Medicine doc is a good general doc to see. They are trained to deal with all kinds of issues, including women-only issues, and if you find a good one who you develop a good relationship with, you can even take your kids (or elderly parents?) to them. It''s one-stop shopping!
 

basil

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I''d look for an internal medicine doctor, unless you want your kids to see the same doctor as you (then I''d choose family practice). An internal medicine doctor can do your pap smears and basic gyn stuff.

As far as how to pick, I honestly have no idea. I need a new doctor but I don''t know how to pick one either! The ones I know and like, I don''t want them to be my doctor cause it would be awkward. But I don''t really trust anyone that I don''t know. It was great when I was in med school - I referred my mom to a new gynecologist that I met on my rotation and had insider knowledge that she was a nice person and a smart doctor.
 

Cehrabehra

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Date: 1/23/2007 6:52:17 PM
Author: codex57
I still say ask for recommendations. Yes, you might find a ton of people who don''t like their docs. That''s cuz a lot of docs are out there who don''t know anything.
hahaha - yanno, my husband and I made a vow about 2 years ago to ask around everyone we know/meet and see if they have an accountant they love and we haven''t had ONE person give a recommendation other than, "I know this guy who used to practice 20 minutes from here but I don''t know if he''s any good" and MOST of the people said, "no, but if you find one could you please let me know?" so I really need to start this *same* thread but insert accountant instead of doctor as well LOL
 

Finding_Neverland

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We moved a couple years ago. Cross country. New State. New town. We''re in the same boat, Cera. Still finding people to do things.

We finally did find a Doctor. Luckily. After Hubby was in the new job a while, he asked around. Got several names of Doctors from people he worked with. I called. They were all full. Taking no new patients. BLECH!!

We went to a few different ones. Chose by credentials and locations and affilitations and such. No hits. All misses. I went back to Hubby''s list. There was one Doctor on there that several people had raved about.

I called back again. Begged and pleaded. Told the Nurse we were new in town. That several of Hubby''s coworkers had recommended the Doctor. The Nurse asked what company. I told her. She took my name and number and said she''d ask the Doctor if he would take us. He did!! And I made an appointment to see him.

Then I worried. What if this turns out like all the other Doctors we''d tried??!! That I wouldn''t like him. Or wasn''t comfortable. But he was GREAT!! Everyone in the family has seen him and we all like him. PHEW!!

I feel your pain!!

Our experience finding a mechanic was even worse. And WAY more expensive. But we finally found a good repair shop. Now if we could just find a Dentist!!
 

Regular Guy

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Asking your friends for advice can be overrated. Cognitive dissonance can kick in...if I''m going to him, I better like him, right? Otherwise, what the heck am I doing?

The fundamentals are there...just not in sufficient numbers.

Likewise, I don''t get the idea of running with a stock, if that''s not my business. Mutual Funds make it their business.

Yes, I emerge again as middle aged man.

Outfits like Consumer Checkbook make it their business to solicit and measure feedback. It''s at least worth a look, and they''re in a number of communities. They''re a non-profit, too, not that that''s proof of anything.
 

:)

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Internal Medicine or ''Internists'' (not to be confused with ''Interns'' which is the first year of training in all areas out of medical school) specialize in adult care and actually do take care of ''female problems'' including pap smears, etc, although a delivery is sent to an OB (or midwife if the patient chooses) - the Internist will follow the woman up to and after the birth in conjunction with the delivering specialist. They routinely take care of the elderly. They do not take care of young pediatrics (exception to follow in a moment). It is a grey area for the age of transition from the Pediatrician to the Internist - mid to late teens is usually a good time, although there is an Internal Medicine Subspecialty in Adolescent Medicine. Some Internists do a combined Internal Medicine/Pediatrics residency which ends up with a board certification eligibility in both Internal Medicine and Pediatrics - obviously this particular subset treats young pediatrics, but most Internists do not. They also do not perform major surgery (only minor procedures such as skin biopsies, joint aspirations and injections, etc). Typically spend that period of training instead in the Internal Medicine Subspecialties such as Cardiology, Pulmonary/Critical Care, Endocrine, GI, Geriatrics, Hematology/Oncology, Nephrology, Infectious Diseases, Rheumatology, etc.
 

lucyloo

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Hi Cehra,

I have a couple of recommendations in the Portland area. Your post said Oregon but not sure if you are in Portland?
 

HOUMedGal

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Date: 1/23/2007 9:36:58 PM
Author: :)
Internal Medicine or ''Internists'' (not to be confused with ''Interns'' which is the first year of training in all areas out of medical school) specialize in adult care and actually do take care of ''female problems'' including pap smears, etc, although a delivery is sent to an OB (or midwife if the patient chooses) - the Internist will follow the woman up to and after the birth in conjunction with the delivering specialist. They routinely take care of the elderly. They do not take care of young pediatrics (exception to follow in a moment). It is a grey area for the age of transition from the Pediatrician to the Internist - mid to late teens is usually a good time, although there is an Internal Medicine Subspecialty in Adolescent Medicine. Some Internists do a combined Internal Medicine/Pediatrics residency which ends up with a board certification eligibility in both Internal Medicine and Pediatrics - obviously this particular subset treats young pediatrics, but most Internists do not. They also do not perform major surgery (only minor procedures such as skin biopsies, joint aspirations and injections, etc). Typically spend that period of training instead in the Internal Medicine Subspecialties such as Cardiology, Pulmonary/Critical Care, Endocrine, GI, Geriatrics, Hematology/Oncology, Nephrology, Infectious Diseases, Rheumatology, etc.
Agreed. However, I have known a few internists who did not do paps, well woman exams, etc because they don''t feel comfortable with them. Interestingly, I have noticed a pattern that the older generation of Internists seem to have more "all-encompassing" practices (similar to those of Family Physicians), and while the younger generation of Internists are the ones who are more likely to not deal with gynecologic stuff or with teens/children. Maybe this is a consequence of the increasing specialization of medicine? If you do a straight Internal Medicine residency, you won''t receive any training (outside of what you get in med school) in gynecologic medicine or in pediatric medicine, as far as I know.
 

Cehrabehra

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Date: 1/23/2007 10:18:31 PM
Author: lucyloo
Hi Cehra,

I have a couple of recommendations in the Portland area. Your post said Oregon but not sure if you are in Portland?
I am near portland.... but I''m west... OHSU is the furthest east I''d go but I''d really prefer someone out in hillsboro/aloha/beaverton. How do you know of these doctors?
 

:)

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Date: 1/24/2007 3:14:54 PM
Author: HOUMedGal

Date: 1/23/2007 9:36:58 PM
Author: :)
Internal Medicine or ''Internists'' (not to be confused with ''Interns'' which is the first year of training in all areas out of medical school) specialize in adult care and actually do take care of ''female problems'' including pap smears, etc, although a delivery is sent to an OB (or midwife if the patient chooses) - the Internist will follow the woman up to and after the birth in conjunction with the delivering specialist. They routinely take care of the elderly. They do not take care of young pediatrics (exception to follow in a moment). It is a grey area for the age of transition from the Pediatrician to the Internist - mid to late teens is usually a good time, although there is an Internal Medicine Subspecialty in Adolescent Medicine. Some Internists do a combined Internal Medicine/Pediatrics residency which ends up with a board certification eligibility in both Internal Medicine and Pediatrics - obviously this particular subset treats young pediatrics, but most Internists do not. They also do not perform major surgery (only minor procedures such as skin biopsies, joint aspirations and injections, etc). Typically spend that period of training instead in the Internal Medicine Subspecialties such as Cardiology, Pulmonary/Critical Care, Endocrine, GI, Geriatrics, Hematology/Oncology, Nephrology, Infectious Diseases, Rheumatology, etc.
Agreed. However, I have known a few internists who did not do paps, well woman exams, etc because they don''t feel comfortable with them. Interestingly, I have noticed a pattern that the older generation of Internists seem to have more ''all-encompassing'' practices (similar to those of Family Physicians), and while the younger generation of Internists are the ones who are more likely to not deal with gynecologic stuff or with teens/children. Maybe this is a consequence of the increasing specialization of medicine? If you do a straight Internal Medicine residency, you won''t receive any training (outside of what you get in med school) in gynecologic medicine or in pediatric medicine, as far as I know.
In pap smears/gyn yes they will absolutely be trained in that - it is a part of their core training that they must be signed off in their procedure logs on paps to complete their residency - it may just be that they did not like doing paps and that was their excuse for it! In Peds, no more training beyond the usual rotations in medical school - unless you do a combined Med Peds program which adds an additional year of residency. I don''t know many internists either that see adolescents, although there is a subspecialty that can be done for a couple of yrs beyond the Internal Med Residency for people interested in that subspecialty. Usually people make the transition about they time they go off to college.
 

codex57

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Date: 1/23/2007 8:07:01 PM
Author: Cehrabehra
Date: 1/23/2007 6:52:17 PM

Author: codex57

I still say ask for recommendations. Yes, you might find a ton of people who don't like their docs. That's cuz a lot of docs are out there who don't know anything.
hahaha - yanno, my husband and I made a vow about 2 years ago to ask around everyone we know/meet and see if they have an accountant they love and we haven't had ONE person give a recommendation other than, 'I know this guy who used to practice 20 minutes from here but I don't know if he's any good' and MOST of the people said, 'no, but if you find one could you please let me know?' so I really need to start this *same* thread but insert accountant instead of doctor as well LOL
Hahaha, true. There may not be a good one around you. But you'll never find that great one if you don't ask. But yeah, I know what you mean about accountants. My dad's a CPA and a lot of what he does is fixing messes caused by the client's previous accountant (one reason why he wanted me to become a lawyer cuz of all the crap he saw).
 

HOUMedGal

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Date: 1/24/2007 4:17:01 PM
Author: :)

Date: 1/24/2007 3:14:54 PM
Author: HOUMedGal


Date: 1/23/2007 9:36:58 PM
Author: :)
Internal Medicine or ''Internists'' (not to be confused with ''Interns'' which is the first year of training in all areas out of medical school) specialize in adult care and actually do take care of ''female problems'' including pap smears, etc, although a delivery is sent to an OB (or midwife if the patient chooses) - the Internist will follow the woman up to and after the birth in conjunction with the delivering specialist. They routinely take care of the elderly. They do not take care of young pediatrics (exception to follow in a moment). It is a grey area for the age of transition from the Pediatrician to the Internist - mid to late teens is usually a good time, although there is an Internal Medicine Subspecialty in Adolescent Medicine. Some Internists do a combined Internal Medicine/Pediatrics residency which ends up with a board certification eligibility in both Internal Medicine and Pediatrics - obviously this particular subset treats young pediatrics, but most Internists do not. They also do not perform major surgery (only minor procedures such as skin biopsies, joint aspirations and injections, etc). Typically spend that period of training instead in the Internal Medicine Subspecialties such as Cardiology, Pulmonary/Critical Care, Endocrine, GI, Geriatrics, Hematology/Oncology, Nephrology, Infectious Diseases, Rheumatology, etc.
Agreed. However, I have known a few internists who did not do paps, well woman exams, etc because they don''t feel comfortable with them. Interestingly, I have noticed a pattern that the older generation of Internists seem to have more ''all-encompassing'' practices (similar to those of Family Physicians), and while the younger generation of Internists are the ones who are more likely to not deal with gynecologic stuff or with teens/children. Maybe this is a consequence of the increasing specialization of medicine? If you do a straight Internal Medicine residency, you won''t receive any training (outside of what you get in med school) in gynecologic medicine or in pediatric medicine, as far as I know.
In pap smears/gyn yes they will absolutely be trained in that - it is a part of their core training that they must be signed off in their procedure logs on paps to complete their residency - it may just be that they did not like doing paps and that was their excuse for it! In Peds, no more training beyond the usual rotations in medical school - unless you do a combined Med Peds program which adds an additional year of residency. I don''t know many internists either that see adolescents, although there is a subspecialty that can be done for a couple of yrs beyond the Internal Med Residency for people interested in that subspecialty. Usually people make the transition about they time they go off to college.
Ahh, I see, I didn''t know that they had to sign off on paps. Heh, in my whole 3 months on my Internal Medicine core rotation, no one ever wanted to touch the "female issues" with the inpatients....they always consulted OB/GYN! However, I can say that I have witnessed my Int. Med. preceptor doing a WWE in her outpatient clinic.
 

Tali

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Date: 1/23/2007 7:09:47 PM
Author: HOUMedGal
Just to help clarify the semantics:


General Practitioner: one who has completed 4 years of med school and an internship (one year) to obtain liscensure. Has NOT completed a residency.


General Internal Medicine doc: 4 years of med school plus 3 year residency in Internal Medicine. Takes care of all adult (usually 18+) problems except for the female ones (think things you would go to the OB/GYN for). Does not do pediatrics.


Family Medicine doc: 4 years of med school plus a 3 year residency in Family Medicine. Takes care of everything, from kids to adults to elderly folks to pregnant ladies.



I''m a little biased (as I''m planning on starting a Family Medicine residency in 1.5 years) but I think a Family Medicine doc is a good general doc to see. They are trained to deal with all kinds of issues, including women-only issues, and if you find a good one who you develop a good relationship with, you can even take your kids (or elderly parents?) to them. It''s one-stop shopping!

THANK YOU for clarifying FP v GP. This is one of my single most pet-peeves, being called a GP when I am a trained/experienced FP. I know when called GP it''s from a lack of understanding of the difference, but IMHO, it''s a big difference, and one I educate people on commonly.
 

HOUMedGal

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Date: 1/24/2007 10:22:17 PM
Author: Tali

Date: 1/23/2007 7:09:47 PM
Author: HOUMedGal
Just to help clarify the semantics:


General Practitioner: one who has completed 4 years of med school and an internship (one year) to obtain liscensure. Has NOT completed a residency.


General Internal Medicine doc: 4 years of med school plus 3 year residency in Internal Medicine. Takes care of all adult (usually 18+) problems except for the female ones (think things you would go to the OB/GYN for). Does not do pediatrics.


Family Medicine doc: 4 years of med school plus a 3 year residency in Family Medicine. Takes care of everything, from kids to adults to elderly folks to pregnant ladies.



I''m a little biased (as I''m planning on starting a Family Medicine residency in 1.5 years) but I think a Family Medicine doc is a good general doc to see. They are trained to deal with all kinds of issues, including women-only issues, and if you find a good one who you develop a good relationship with, you can even take your kids (or elderly parents?) to them. It''s one-stop shopping!

THANK YOU for clarifying FP v GP. This is one of my single most pet-peeves, being called a GP when I am a trained/experienced FP. I know when called GP it''s from a lack of understanding of the difference, but IMHO, it''s a big difference, and one I educate people on commonly.
Hehe, no problem. As a budding Family Physician myself, I will also want folks to know what they''re getting when they choose me over a GP. There is a big difference in the length and the scope of the training.
 

Cehrabehra

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Date: 1/24/2007 11:09:29 PM
Author: HOUMedGal

Date: 1/24/2007 10:22:17 PM
Author: Tali

THANK YOU for clarifying FP v GP. This is one of my single most pet-peeves, being called a GP when I am a trained/experienced FP. I know when called GP it''s from a lack of understanding of the difference, but IMHO, it''s a big difference, and one I educate people on commonly.
Hehe, no problem. As a budding Family Physician myself, I will also want folks to know what they''re getting when they choose me over a GP. There is a big difference in the length and the scope of the training.
I''m really glad you guys have clarified this as well!! No GP for me! I loved my perinatologist - all of them were so much more "up" on latest things that they were so much more laid back than my obgyn had been with my first. I''d prefer more over less in terms of education and training :D I''m still playing in my head between FP and Internal because my kids have a ped and I have another I''d use in a heartbeat and kinda prefer specialized in childhood.... so mostly it''s just for me and my dh - he doesn''t have a doc at the moment, but I''d prefer to have a one stop shop hehe for pap and everything else, yet my issues would maybe be better with an internist?? I dunno!!
 

divergrrl

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Dec 9, 2002
Messages
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Cehra: I choose my doctor by referral. I have had really bad luck with female ob/gyns. I went through 5 in 2 years before someone finally gave me a diagnostic test to find out what was wrong with me. (would bleed uncontrollably for 35 to 55 days at a time, all they ever did was throw the pill at me...tell me to take 4 or 5 a day until it stopped--jerks--finally found a doc who gave me an ultrasound and lo and behold...TUMOR!) Then when I had a miscarriage she threw a pamphlet at me and said "well it''ll be like a heavy AF". And when I got pg again, she wasn''t even happy for me.

My surgeon who removed my tumor (a guy) actually gave me a hug and told me I''d have a baby no problem. He was so warm & wonderful in a not creepy way, that when my friend referred me to an OB who was a male, I was all for it. My OB delivered my boy, has taken such good care of me, and when I miscarried again, had me come in a few times to make sure I was ok emotionally. Such a great guy. I wouldn''t rule out males, in my experience, they''ve been nicer and more caring than the female OBs. Its almost like the female docs have a chip on their shoulder...or at least the ones I''ve run into.

If you want, I can give you the names of some docs I like. My OB doesn''t take new patients, but...my & DH''s primary care is here too, and he''s nice, but he doesn''t do "women''s" stuff. There is also a female doc at my son''s clinic (its a women & childrens clinic) I believe she is a family doc, cuz she has seen my son when my ped is out, but she also treat''s my neighbor who''s my age. But I really liked her, she made a point of calling me one weekend when I had to take Jake to the ER to make sure he was ok and then followed up like nobody''s business. She was sharp & compassionate. HTH.

But I''d ask everyone who lives near you who their doc is and if they like them and why. Word of mouth is the best.

Diver
 
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