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Mexico Honeymoons affected by recent news?

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modernsparkler

Brilliant_Rock
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Apr 26, 2008
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From the US State Department Website

"February 20, 2009

This Travel Alert updates security information for U.S. citizens traveling and living in Mexico. It supersedes the Travel Alert for Mexico dated October 15, 2008, and expires on August 20, 2009.

While millions of U.S. citizens safely visit Mexico each year (including thousands who cross the land border every day for study, tourism or business), violence in the country has increased recently. It is imperative that travelers understand the risks of travel to Mexico, how best to avoid dangerous situations, and whom to contact if one becomes a crime victim. Common-sense precautions such as visiting only legitimate business and tourist areas during daylight hours, and avoiding areas where prostitution and drug dealing might occur, can help ensure that travel to Mexico is safe and enjoyable.


Crime and Violence Throughout Mexico


The greatest increase in violence has occurred near the U.S. border. However, U.S. citizens traveling throughout Mexico should exercise caution in unfamiliar areas and be aware of their surroundings at all times. Mexican and foreign bystanders have been injured or killed in violent attacks in cities across the country, demonstrating the heightened risk of violence in public places. In recent years, dozens of U.S. citizens have been kidnapped across Mexico. Many of these cases remain unresolved. U.S. citizens who believe they are being targeted for kidnapping or other crimes should notify Mexican officials and the nearest American consulate or the Embassy as soon as possible, and should consider returning to the United States.


U.S. citizens should make every attempt to travel on main roads during daylight hours, particularly the toll ("cuota") roads, which generally are more secure. Occasionally, the U.S. Embassy and consulates advise their employees as well as private U.S. citizens to avoid certain areas, abstain from driving on certain roads because of dangerous conditions or criminal activity, or recommend driving during daylight hours only. When warranted, U.S. government employees are restricted from traveling to or within parts of Mexico without prior approval from their supervisors. When this happens, the Embassy or the affected consulate will alert the local U.S. citizen Warden network and post the information on their respective websites, indicating the nature of the concern and the expected time period for which the restriction will remain in place. U.S. citizen visitors are encouraged to stay in the well-known tourist areas of the cities. Travelers should leave their itinerary with a friend or family member not traveling with them, avoid traveling alone, and should check with their cellular provider prior to departure to confirm that their cell phone is capable of roaming on GSM or 3G international networks. Do not display expensive-looking jewelry, large amounts of money, or other valuable items.


Violence Along the U.S. - Mexico Border


Mexican drug cartels are engaged in an increasingly violent conflict - both among themselves and with Mexican security services - for control of narcotics trafficking routes along the U.S.-Mexico border. In order to combat violence, the government of Mexico has deployed troops in various parts of the country. U.S. citizens should cooperate fully with official checkpoints when traveling on Mexican highways.


Some recent Mexican army and police confrontations with drug cartels have resembled small-unit combat, with cartels employing automatic weapons and grenades. Large firefights have taken place in many towns and cities across Mexico but most recently in northern Mexico, including Tijuana, Chihuahua City and Ciudad Juarez. During some of these incidents, U.S. citizens have been trapped and temporarily prevented from leaving the area. The U.S. Mission in Mexico currently restricts non-essential travel to the state of Durango and all parts of the state of Coahuila south of Mexican Highways 25 and 22 and the Alamos River for U.S. government employees assigned to Mexico. This restriction was implemented in light of the recent increase in assaults, murders, and kidnappings in those two states. The situation in northern Mexico remains fluid; the location and timing of future armed engagements cannot be predicted.


A number of areas along the border are experiencing rapid growth in the rates of many types of crime. Robberies, homicides, petty thefts, and carjackings have all increased over the last year across Mexico generally, with notable spikes in Tijuana and northern Baja California. Ciudad Juarez, Tijuana and Nogales are among the cities which have recently experienced public shootouts during daylight hours in shopping centers and other public venues. Criminals have followed and harassed U.S. citizens traveling in their vehicles in border areas including Nuevo Laredo, Matamoros, and Tijuana.


The situation in Ciudad Juarez is of special concern. Mexican authorities report that more than 1,800 people have been killed in the city since January 2008. Additionally, this city of 1.6 million people experienced more than 17,000 car thefts and 1,650 carjackings in 2008. U.S. citizens should pay close attention to their surroundings while traveling in Ciudad Juarez, avoid isolated locations during late night and early morning hours, and remain alert to news reports. A recent series of muggings near the U.S. Consulate General in Ciudad Juarez targeted applicants for U.S. visas. Visa and other service seekers visiting the Consulate are encouraged to make arrangements to pay for those services using a non-cash method.


U.S. citizens are urged to be alert to safety and security concerns when visiting the border region. Criminals are armed with a wide array of sophisticated weapons. In some cases, assailants have worn full or partial police or military uniforms and have used vehicles that resemble police vehicles. While most crime victims are Mexican citizens, the uncertain security situation poses serious risks for U.S. citizens as well. U.S. citizen victims of crime in Mexico are urged to contact the consular section of the nearest U.S. consulate or Embassy for advice and assistance. Contact information is provided at the end of this message."

Full article at-
http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/pa/pa_3028.html

Just wondering if this is causing anyone to change travel plans. We are going to the Mayan Riviera in June and so far nothing is changed, we are just trying to keep up with the news.

 

GoingCrazy29

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jun 19, 2008
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373
It didn't really change anything for us, but it helped us make a decision. We were undecided between someplace on the Pacific side of Mexico and Costa Rica- so now we've just decided on Costa Rica, which we quite possibly would have anyway! If we had really decided someplace in Mexico, I don't think I would change plans just yet...
 

Elmorton

Ideal_Rock
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Jul 5, 2007
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I''ve been watching this stuff on the news lately ("Parents! Tell your college student not to go to Cabo this year!") and I think it''s a leeetle sensationalized. First of all, when traveling in a foreign country, no matter where you are, a person should be aware of their surroundings and the people around them. Plus, bad things can happen no matter where you are - seriously, how many people simply fall off cruise ships each year? Second, this warning is about border towns/non-tourist spots. I don''t think there are many people planning to stay in Juarez for their honeymoon nor planning on taking the back roads to drive to Riviera Maya. I''d travel to my bookmarked cities (Ixtapa/Zihua, Huatulco, Mazatlan) in a heartbeat right now and not think twice about it.
 

AllieGator

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Dec 1, 2008
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316
As someone who will be studying abroad for a semester in Mexico next year, this hasn''t effected me at all. Alot of times, violence against americans is caused by the Americans inexperience, and for lack of a better term, stupidity.

I''ve travelled a lot throughout latin america (I even travelled from Lima to Trujillo, Peru by myself on the bus), and I''ve never had a problem. You just have to be smart about it.

As for affecting honeymoons, the usual beach/tourist areas should be fine...Mexico''s tourist industry is huge, and I''m sure the government will be sure to keep those areas safe.
 

CDNinNYC

Ideal_Rock
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Oct 21, 2007
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2,216
We''re getting married in Mexico (Playa del Carmen) in May and our plans haven''t changed. Doesn''t sound like the tourist regions are affected.
 

Izzy03

Brilliant_Rock
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Dec 10, 2007
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613
We booked our honeymoon in Mexico last week, and a few days later my fiance was telling some people about our honeymoon, and they flipped out! They said that travel alerts were all over the news saying how bad Mexico is getting, and they said we are crazy to go. I watch a lot of news (CNN, MSNBC) and have heard nothing of it. So immediately we get to the computer to check it out, and it really didn''t concern us too much.

I think the major concern is for Americans who visit Mexican "ghettos" and for Americans (college students in particular) who DO attempt to purchase drugs while in Mexico. After all, it is the drug cartel contributing to this surge of violence.

I''ve heard in Jamaica you shouldn''t even leave your resort without a hotel guide, so really I feel pretty save about Cancun. I don''t think it would have changed our minds if we had heard about it sooner.
 

Winslet

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Messages
303
FI and I are still going to Cabo, and have absolutely no worries about it, though I''m not looking forward to the moment when his overly worrisome mother finds out about the travel warnings. I''ve actually spent my past 3 spring breaks in college doing community service projects in Juarez (where the height of the problem is) and have always felt safe enough - though I''ve acted very, very cautiously. Not to sound like a mom, but the safest thing you can do on your honeymoon is to just avoid talking to people outside of whatever resort you''re staying in (i.e. people who aren''t obviously involved in the legitimate tourism industry). Take advantage of the opportunity to make the honeymoon a really private time for you and your FI while enjoying some of the breathtaking ocean views. It doesn''t hurt to be extra cautious, though this certainly doesn''t mean you need to be afraid or paranoid.
 

SarahLovesJS

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Feb 2, 2008
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5,206
We were kind of already teetering on canceling..so we did. No ritz in Cancun for us..
..we''re looking for somewhere closer to home now, I think since the Hawaii thing fell through.
 

galvana

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
May 4, 2008
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884
No - I am not worried at all. Not one tiny bit. We are going to Cancun for the 2nd part of our honeymoon and as long as you are not stupid while there, you are fine. We will stay at the resort or on the strip.
Unless you go "off the beaten path" so to speak, you really have nothing to worry about.
 

blissfulbride

Shiny_Rock
Joined
May 9, 2008
Messages
485
we are going to cancun also for our honeymoon. April 27th, and we aren''t worried either. our resort is for honeymooners anyways. Its not like we are staying right on the strip with the craziness. Trust me ive been to cancun during spring break, and it was crazy. I know exactly were the trouble happens and we will not be anywhere near it.
 
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