Find your diamond
Find your jewelry
shape
carat
color
clarity

Lead Paint when children are in the house

Status
Not open for further replies. Please create a new topic or request for this thread to be opened.

janinegirly

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Sep 21, 2006
Messages
3,689
I know this is a huge and general topic, but I''ve been worried about it for some time. My 5month old and I have been at my parents house for sometime now. It is a large home, but old--over 200 years old! Renovated in the early 90''s. Anyway, I''m sure there must be lead in the paint, and there are some chips here and there. The baby is too little to go anywhere near it and we''ll be out of the house way before she starts crawling etc. However, I start to wonder about things like paint particles in the air. I mean it seems like something that is so impossible to eliminate, and there has to be lots and lots of old houses out there with little ones, so I just don''t know how much I should proactively be doing about it other than make sure she does not touch/eat any paint chips?

PS Our new home is also older (but 60 yrs vs. 200!) and has tested + for lead paint as well. No deteriorating paint though, although bathroom peels when there is too much moisture (will be painted over before we move). It seems impossible to avoid unless you have a brand new home.

I know we have alot of intellectuals on this forum, so thought I should throw it out there..
 

neatfreak

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Feb 17, 2007
Messages
14,167
It''s fine as long as she isn''t eating handfuls of paint chips. Just do what you can to make sure the lead paint is covered and not chipping.
 

janinegirly

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Sep 21, 2006
Messages
3,689
thanks..

is it possible though that deteriorating paint (chips etc) can also release paint particles in the air? Or is that not a concern. I thought of it because there my parents are planning to have some paint work done and the painter mentioned sanding. Well needless to say, I asked that that be delayed until we're out of the house--but it started me wondering about particles that come about just from the deterioration process...
 

swingirl

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Apr 6, 2006
Messages
5,655
Date: 2/27/2009 3:58:39 PM
Author: MC
Here is the EPA website. . .(if you scroll up slighly the page talks about children/lead)


http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/leadinfo.htm#health
Based on what they say lead is everywhere! I think the worst contamination happens when people sand old paint off and let the dust and chips lay around on the ground outside and on the floor inside. The dust is very fine and gets everywhere. But if you aren''t removing the old paint I don''t think it''s too dangerous. Just watch out for chipping paint on windows and baseboards. Most of us probably have some level of lead in our systems from living indoors where lead paint was used years ago.
 

curlygirl

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Apr 9, 2005
Messages
2,637
Date: 2/27/2009 4:08:15 PM
Author: swingirl

Date: 2/27/2009 3:58:39 PM
Author: MC
Here is the EPA website. . .(if you scroll up slighly the page talks about children/lead)


http://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/leadinfo.htm#health
Based on what they say lead is everywhere! I think the worst contamination happens when people sand old paint off and let the dust and chips lay around on the ground outside and on the floor inside. The dust is very fine and gets everywhere. But if you aren''t removing the old paint I don''t think it''s too dangerous. Just watch out for chipping paint on windows and baseboards. Most of us probably have some level of lead in our systems from living indoors where lead paint was used years ago.
I agree, lead really is everywhere. I wouldn''t worry too much about it. You know my living situation so surely there is lead in the paint in my apartment! Our pediatrician does a test at 12 months to check for lead levels. I''m not sure if that''s just a thing they do in NYC or if it''s a regular part of all babies'' one year check ups. You might want to call your pedi if you''re really concerned. Hang in there, girl. You''re doing a great job!
 

diane5006

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Apr 8, 2003
Messages
652
You are aware of the issue which is good...make sure you mention to your pediatrican what type of housing you are in...theorectically they should be asking.

Ingesting is the most common way to get lead...but you need a bunch...

For your new house especially the bathroom you may want to have it professionally removes...before repainting

Most new homes built in the last 40 years don''t have ''lead'' paint

Due in great part to studies carried out by Philip J. Landrigan, paint containing more than 0.06% (600 ppm)[vague] lead was banned for residential use in the United States in 1978 by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (16 Code of Federal Regulations CFR 1303). The U.S. Government defines "lead-based paint" as any "paint, surface coating that contains lead equal to or exceeding one milligram per square centimeter(1.0 mg/cm2) or 0.5% by weight." [2] Some states have adopted this or similar definitions of "lead-based paint." These definitions are used to enforce regulations that apply to certain activities conducted in housing constructed prior to 1978, such as abatement, or the permanent elimination of a "lead-based paint hazard."
 

oobiecoo

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Sep 10, 2007
Messages
2,263
I wouldn't worry too much about it. Also though, make sure you are aware of asbestos in flooring and ceiling popcorn... that is something that can be more serious and inhaled.
 

LtlFirecracker

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Feb 29, 2008
Messages
4,837
Good responses above.

The best you can do is repaint the areas that are chipping and make sure your child is not peeling paint off the walls and eating it. If there is new paint on the wall (1990''s paint is lead free), and it is not peeling, than it is safe.

Since you live in an old house it might be worth mentioning it to your pediatrician. They can do a complete blood count looking for anemia and lead level at 1 year of age just to make sure.
 
Status
Not open for further replies. Please create a new topic or request for this thread to be opened.
Be a part of the community It's free, join today!
    Horses for Courses: Polo Match Jewelry
    Horses for Courses: Polo Match Jewelry
    An Excellent K Color Graded Diamond
    An Excellent K Color Graded Diamond
    Astounding AVR
    Astounding AVR

Need Something Special?

Get a quote from multiple trusted and vetted jewelers.

Holloway Cut Advisor



Diamond Eye Candy

Click to view full-size image.
Top