Find your diamond
Find your jewelry
shape
carat
color
clarity

Is using fondant a skill anyone has picked up?

Status
Not open for further replies. Please create a new topic or request for this thread to be opened.

So_happy

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Nov 12, 2006
Messages
1,084
Just wondering if someone who has basic appreciation and knowledge of baking can pick up this skill? I hear the stuff is awkward to work with but wondered if I shoudl attempt it. Yes, I would be considering doing my own wedding cake. Well, actually, I''d just ice a styrofoam cake with the fondant and then bake a sheet cake w/yummier icing for serving (or just get the sheet cake baked somewhere else).

So far, I have no other DIY projects that will run during the couple days prior to wedding like many of you have so I figure if I did this one, I could handle it......
 

rainbowtrout

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Dec 2, 2005
Messages
2,105
there are some books online on baking for celebrations. I''m making my cake as well. One thing I recommend is have a bakeup baker lined up who can do something if you realize a month before you are just too crazy with other things.

RE: fondant. It looks nice, tasts iffy, have to roll it and wrap it. So it takes 3X longer than buttercream..Never iced anything big with it though.


LadyKemma? Anything?




http://www.amazon.com/Wedding-Cakes-You-Can-Make/dp/076455719X/sr=8-2/qid=1171523918/ref=sr_1_2/102-7147887-2186519?ie=UTF8&s=books

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/047170136X/ref=pd_cp_b_title/102-7147887-2186519
 

ladykemma

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 2, 2006
Messages
2,194
it looks difficult and tastes gross. give me a good buttercream anyday.

BYW, cakes are easier to transport when frozen.

i would defineitely do a prototype a month ahead.
 

anchor31

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Oct 18, 2005
Messages
7,074
I''m having a friend make our cake, she took baking and cake decorating classes and she offered to do it for us. She works with fondant and says it''s not difficult... But I wouldn''t know. Good luck!
 

Lorelei

Super_Ideal_Rock
Premium
Joined
Apr 30, 2005
Messages
42,064
I have used it for cakes in the past and made my own, it there is a knack to handling it though. Some find it easier than others.
 

Mrs Mitchell

Ideal_Rock
Joined
Sep 22, 2006
Messages
2,071
Hi, just wanted to say good luck with the fondant. DH and I made our wedding cake, and have done a couple more as wedding gifts since, so you might find some of these tips we picked up useful. (please note, we were enthusiastic amatuers, not experts by any stretch, so someone else might be able to correct anything I''ve got wrong!):

The fondant has to be kneaded really well before you roll it out - gets out any trapped air bubbles. You can warm it gently in the microwave for a few seconds to make this easier. Watch it very closely so it doesn''t melt.

Roll it out to the size you need + about 10% , then rub it over with a flat surface - basically any flat, very smooth rectangular or circular object, but you can buy plastic fondant smoothing tools for this. you basically want to polish it smooth and very very flat. While you''re working with it, use powdered icing sugar (like you would use flour when rolling / working with pastry).

Make sure the cake / styrofoam is perfectly level (we''re a bit obsessive, so we used a spirit level to check each tier) and trim tiny pieces of cake with a non-flexible knife until it''s right - I think fondant seems to emphasise any lumps and bumps or unevenness!

If you''re using cake rather than styrofoam, brush it over with alcohol and boiled sieved jelly to make the fondant (or marzipan if you''re using it) stick. The alcohol kills any bacteria (I was so paranoid about cutting a mouldy cake on the day, I think it ended up highly alcoholic).

Drape the rolled fondant over a rolling pin (or your arm, if it''s a huge cake!) then drop it gently onto the cake. Flatten it over with you hands then get the smoothing tool over it again, with a tiny sprinkling of icing sugar powder to help polish it smooth. Work from the centre of the cake outwards, then when you have it smooth and flat on top, start working down the sides.

When the cake is covered and you''re happy with it, cut the excess from the bottom with a sharp knife, a little at a time, holding the knife parallel to the side of the cake and cutting down into the excess fondant at the base of the cake.

I piped the pattern of my dress fabric onto the cake (white stitching on white silk) then added roses to match my bouquet. For favours, I made minature versions of the cake, piped them to match, put them on tiny cake boards and tied them in cellophane with gold ribbon. 60 of them. I still wake screaming from vivid nightmares about making these little cakes. It was way more complicated than the actuall wedding cake and soooo fussy to do.

Basically, fondant isn''t too hard to work with and you can get really nice results with a little patience (and maybe a practice run, if you have time).
I apologise for the length of this post, but I really hope it is some help - good luck. We had really good fun making our wedding cake - and it was lovely to spend a day together doing this, just before the wedding.

Jen
 

MMM

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Sep 19, 2006
Messages
526
This was my first ever attempt with working with fondant. It was just for a small birthday cake but it was a pretty ambitious design.

It was faaaaaaar from perfect, but extremely cute, and with more practice I think I could have gotten everything smooth.

I do agree about the taste of fondant thought. I dont really enjoy it...

cake fondant 1.jpg
 

MMM

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Sep 19, 2006
Messages
526
...last one...

also... i was only in high school when i made this cake and not what anyone would call "experienced with cakes"
i''m sure you would do better than this on your first try if you already have decorating experience.

but i''m still proud of my little cake :)

cake fondant 3.jpg
 

aktotx

Rough_Rock
Joined
Feb 11, 2007
Messages
20
MMM...... Your cake looks good. I don''t see anytihing wrong with it. I don''t think I have the patience to work with fondant at all.
 

rockzilla

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Nov 19, 2006
Messages
1,286
I know that a lot of michael''s have cake decorating classes...they are pretty inexpensive and could "get you started"

Though, I have to warn you...once I went to a Michael''s for a "free demonstration" of fondant decorating. I was really excited, and then I got there, and first off the guy was 20 minutes late. Secondly, he was REALLY gross looking...unshaven, just kind of sloppy...really doubtful that he had taken a shower (or washed his hands...ugh) in days. And then he started mushing all the fondant up in his hands...needless to say I didn''t take the class from him!

But, if you avoid the Montclair, CA location, I think Michaels might be a good resource.

RZ
 

So_happy

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Nov 12, 2006
Messages
1,084
That cake you made is SO adorable!! Great job :) We have a JoAnn''s around here that has a cake decorating class in the next week or so!! I think I might try it and I hope I don''t get dirty guy from CA as my instructor lol.


I''ve also resorted to sending a pic of the cake I want to diff cake bakers in the area to see what prices I''ll get just in case I don''t get the hang of using this stuff!
 

neatfreak

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Feb 17, 2007
Messages
14,167
Having worked at a bakery throughout HS and some of college...I can tell you it is sometimes a pain to work with. If you are very patient and have the time, it can look incredible. But as others have mentioned, it WILL make any imperfections stand out and it can be pretty fussy.

Some tips:

The most important thing I picked up from the woman who made the cakes at our bakery was that the fondant needed to be rolled to exactly the same height all around. She also used to make the circles of fondant quite a bit bigger than she needed them...said they draped easier that way. Also, it is very important to drape within a few minutes of rolling it out. If you don't you risk more cracks and it's more of a pain.

As for the stickyness, we always used a small layer of buttercream under the fondant as a "crumb catcher". Even on styrofoam I imagine it would make it much easier to drape smoothly.

Also, make sure you STORE and work with the fondant at room temperature. It can dry out pretty easily, so make sure it is stored in an airtight container and when you're working with it you can drape a moist cloth over the top of the container so it doesn't dry.


I would def. do a test run...especially if you are like me and are a perfectionist! Otherwise, have some extra buttercream for a backup. You can always ice with that if you end up getting frustrated witht the fondant!

Most of all...GOOD LUCK!!! With some patience I'm sure you can do it. Fondant cakes look beautiful.
 
Status
Not open for further replies. Please create a new topic or request for this thread to be opened.
Be a part of the community It's free, join today!
    Three-stone engagement ring upgrade
    Three-stone engagement ring upgrade
    Vintage OEC Bracelet
    Vintage OEC Bracelet
    June’s Birthstone Trinity
    June’s Birthstone Trinity

Need Something Special?

Get a quote from multiple trusted and vetted jewelers.

Holloway Cut Advisor



Diamond Eye Candy

Click to view full-size image.
Top