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How to turn down a job I sort of accepted....

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gail013

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Sep 21, 2006
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335
I work for a custom builder in a neighborhood of upper end single family homes, and have been with my builder for ten years. I was unhappy about several things, and found out the other builder in our area was looking for someone. We met, we discussed a FEW things, and I was offered the position, which is 100% commission based. I accepted, but told him I wanted to review details before I gave my notice. The area I would be selling is farther away from me, and in an area I knew nothing about. It looked good, and I thought this builder must know what they are doing to take on a project in this location. There was someone else trying to sell this location who I heard wasn''t working out for a variety of reasons. I do believe there are always two sides to that story. I also know this location was available to the two other agents who work for him, and they did not take it.....

Well, yesterday, I called five other agents in the area, and heard very discouraging news and statistics about what is selling here. Enough for me to question making the move. I want to work for this builder badly because he is more professional, and builds a fabulous home. However the product I would be selling is average, and is a single family detached townhome, with only a few available plans. I am used to selling custom, single family, and I know my talents would be wasted. Mostly, I think it would be a large paycut for me if the project does not work out. He has no other projects to offer me, and really can offer me no guarantees. So it is a huge gamble professionally.

So, how do I back out? Is it insulting for me to say that I have done market research and I am too concerned about what is selling to take the job-I want to be able to work for them someday, and don''t want this builder to think his project is a dud. But I want him to know I am no dumbie. My DH thinks I should simply say, that I don''t think the project is right for me. But I think that sounds kinda wishy-washy.

To make it even stickier, I will see this guy often, we are competing builders now in the same nieghborhood, and he lives here too!


Any suggestions, I have to call him tomorrow morning-yuk!
 

strmrdr

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Nov 1, 2003
Messages
23,295
Something along the lines of thank you for the offer but at this time I dont feel this would be the right move for me.
 

WTNLVR

Brilliant_Rock
Joined
Jan 30, 2005
Messages
623
I would tell him the truth- that after talking to other realtors about the market in that area, you can''t accept the position at this time. Then say, if the opportunity exists in the future, when the market picks up, you would love to work for him.
 

Finding_Neverland

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Jan 10, 2007
Messages
412
First, compliment him. What a great builder he is. How professional he is. How flattered you were that he considered you for the postition. And you appreciate the time to carefully consider his offer.

Then say you don''t feel you are the right candidate for the position. That your area of expertise really is custom design homes. That his particular market is not one where you could "hit the ground running". You appreciate his confidence in you, but you feel taking the position would be a great disservice to both of you. Thank him for the offer.
 

movie zombie

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 20, 2005
Messages
11,879
not only does she sport a wonderful johnny depp avatar, she gives excellent advice!

movie zombie
 

diamondfan

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jun 17, 2005
Messages
11,016
I agree. You did say it was provisional and you wanted to check out some things. You now have, and do not feel it is a good move for you. I would definitely make it so that no bridges are burned...something like, Well, having done the checking I mentioned, I just feel that this is not the right position for me at this time, but I really appreciate the offer. It would not be fair to you for me to take this job at this time. You know the point, you want to gracefully exit while keeping any future potential involvements intact...or if you cross paths in the future, that it will not be uncomfortable. You never know when you might meet again in business so it is best to say the least damaging thing. You did say before you gave your notice you needed to check some things out, so I would not be too worried, you have done just that.
 

Mara

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Oct 30, 2002
Messages
31,003
I agree with Finding Neverland. Point out that your talent and experience is with the custom design space and that you don''t feel you''d be challenged working in a more tract-home kind of model. That you are very flattered because you do respect him and have heard wonderful things about his professionalism and quality, but that at this time you have to decline. Tell him that in the future if he ever goes into custom design or anything more detailed than the most basic projects you''d love to speak to him again.
 

gail013

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Sep 21, 2006
Messages
335
Thanks everyone, I took your advice and told him what you suggested. Unfortunately, I was not able to reach him directly, so I had to leave a message. I knew he is headed out of town for a week tomorrow, and I didn''t want to play phone tag with him all day. Sometimes making the decision you know is right, but you don''t want to make is so hard-
 

movie zombie

Super_Ideal_Rock
Joined
Jan 20, 2005
Messages
11,879
the good news is that you did the research and found that you aren''t as dissatisfied with your current job as you might have thought and you have explored your options. you have a feel for the market for your kind of work and have pinpointed what you do want in a new job and what you don''t want. good work! i remember once many years ago being told that it was worth keeping your resume updated and interviewing each year with the goal in mind of making sure you were adequately compensated, keeping you finger on the pulse of your job market/industry, and perhaps finding you weren''t as dissatisfied with your job as you may have thought or that you weren''t as badly paid as you thought. i think that is still good advice. nothing ventured, nothing gained as the old sayiing goes. i''m sure the other employer will be impressed that you are clear about what you want to do and this could translate well for him.....he might even contact you if he has a job opening more appropriate to your skills and level of expertise.

movie zombie
 

gail013

Shiny_Rock
Joined
Sep 21, 2006
Messages
335
Oh, the potential new employer called and is trying to woo me over. Truthfully, I would love to work for this guy, but he can''t make me any guarantees. What I didn''t say earlier, is that my current builder is going thru a very hard time now, as it everyone in the industry here. We have laid off several people, and the future is rather unclear. So it is a risk, but staying where I am is a risk too, since I am 100% commission.

My builder has been fair to me, but there are alot of issues, and I think for him to be successful again, we need alot of work.
 
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